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Full text of "Motorcycle Illustrated: 2nd Half 1909"

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SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL MEN 






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M'e Gemjaay. 



WK DAVIDSOM. J*.. 
Harley-Daridaoe Motor Cemptsy. 



AXTHTO DAVTDSOM. 
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ep*a*& wamrm, 



W. T. MABSH. 
J mi mean Motor Company. 



JAKES TTTRPIN. 
New Era Gas Engine Company. 





Motorcycle illustrated 



Hoiimker MvWr Mf* Cc 




M.OfiOE M. HENDEE, 
Lm Mkj jfa'.-turin* Company, 




D'O'tliSSEWH MURKER 
Merkel-Lig-ht Motor Company. 



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TEN CENTS 



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OTORCYCL 



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ILLUSTRATED 



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vol. iv July 1, 1909 No13 

MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 




PHENOMENAL POWER 

IS THE CHARACTERISTIC OF THE 

=IIMDIAIM= 



You don't have to go fast unless you wish to, but you do need power to pull 

over heavy roads and hills. 

Don't buy inefficiency because you don't care for speed. 



Get 
Quality 




Get 
Power 



If you don't want a big machine, get a smaller one — but get it GOOD. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

HENDEE MANUFACTURING CO., S p^gfejdT Ma ,, 

CHICAGO BRANCH, 1251 Michigan Avenue. 



iys 



£ 



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M OTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Records Broken 



BY THE 




glT At Los Angeles, Cal , June 20th, 1909 9 R. Seymour broke 
jl four mile competition flying start record. Time 3 min. 17 sec. 

JIT Seymour also established seven, eight, and nine mile 
jl records; Time 5 min. 45 4/5 sec; 6 min. 35 4/5 sec, and 
7 min. 25 1/5 sec. respectively. 



#JT The R-S, in speed tests where stock machines 
^J are entered, please and gratify the riders. 

#TT And then there are the roads tests, and every 
jl day performances of the R-S in actual service 
and use. These are what satisfy and delight 
their users. 



You should know of this wonderful 

Motorcycle— The R-S 



Write for catalogue and particulars. Agents wanted. 

READING STANDARD COMPANY 

Bingaman and Water Streets, :: :: Reading, Pa. 



Kindly always mention the paper- -when writing advertisers. 



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OTORCYCL 



ILLUSTRATED 






Vol. IV. No. 13 



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July 1, 1909 



PUBLISHED BY THE MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



AUGUST 9th TO 14th— CONVENTION WEBK':V.\ 

ENDURANCE RUN ON THE 9TH AND 10TH FROM CLEVELAND TO INDIANAPGLI&V^ 
DISTANCE OF 368 MILES— F. A. M. CHAMPIONSHIPS WILL BE RUN OFF ON TJIEfrVV- 
SPEEDWAY THE 12TH AND 13TH— TRADE IS GIVING LIBERAL SUPPORT ••"* 
TO THE INDIANA CLUB— LARGE NUMBER OF SPECIAL PRIZES. 



INDIANAPOLIS ahoy! The dates of the convention, 
of the endurance run and of the speedway race meet 
have been determined. They will be held the second 
week in August, by which time the track will have been 
completed. The preliminaries arranged, it now remains 
for every F. A. M. member, in position to do so, to get 
to Indianapolis during that week. There is plenty of 
time in which to fix your vacation so that it will dove- 
tail with the big annual event of the Federation of 
American Motorcyclists. Riders are coming from Cali- 
fornia, from Texas and from Maine, in fact, the indica- 
tions are that fully four-fifths, if not a greater percentage 
of the States, will be represented. » 

The Indianapolis bunch of enthusiasts are doing their duty; 
arrangements are being made on a scale more elaborate 
than has been ever before attempted. Indianapolis, with 
probably as many riders as are to be found in any city of 
its size in the country, is about to have the finest track in 
the world. Can you ask for any more? Could there be a 
greater incentive than just the conditions which will be 
found to exist in that city? 

Get together, then, boys, and see to it that your club 
is well represented. Make the journey awheel, if pos- 
sible. Remember that the coming convention is to be the 
most important in the history of the organization; hence- 
forth, the F. A. M. is to be a factor, a big factor, in 
the motoring world. Are you going to help to put the 
organization where it belongs, in the van of the motoring 
procession? If you are interested, show your interest 
next month. Go to Indianapolis. 



THE committee in charge of the F. A. M. endurance run, to 
be held in connection with the annual meet at In- 
dianapolis, has definitely determined upon Monday and Tues- 
day, August 9th and ioth respectively, as the date. The nth 
will be reserved for the entertainment of visitors, and on the 
12th and 13th, the F. A. M. championships and the other races 
will be conducted on the Indianapolis motor speedway. 

The proposed itinerary of the endurance run is from 
Cleveland to Indianapolis, instead of from Indianapolis to 
French Lick and return, as had been originally in- 
tended. The first day's run will be from Cleveland, through 
Twinsville, Springfield Lake, Canton, New Philadelphia, 
Coshocton, Newark to Columbus, a distance of 190 miles. 
The second day the endurance run entrants will ride from 
Columbus through Springfield, Dayton, Eaton, Richmond, 
Cambridge City, Dublin, Louisville, Knightstown to the finish 



in Indianapolis, a distance of 178 miles, making a total of 
368 miles. 

Among the racing events, on the speedway, will be the 
following: Five miles, limited to private owners; five 
miles, F. A. M. national championship ; five miles, lim- 
ited to private owners, members of the Indiana Motorcycle 
Club; ten miles, F. A. M. national championship; five miles, 
for machines with a piston displacement of less than 55 cubic 
inches and without auxiliary exhaust ports; ten miles, profes- 
sional; 25 miles, open to machines of less than 30 V2 cubic 
inches displacement ; one mile trials ; two and one-half miles, 
limited to private owners; five miles professional; ten miles 
open, for machines of less than 30^ cubic inches displace- 
ment; one hour F. A. M. national championship. 



THE Indiana Motorcycle Club expects to enlist the services 
of the soldiers of Battery A, as well as a large force of 
the Indianapolis police with a view to preventing any accidents 
during the races. The club is being liberally and enthusias- 
tically supported by the trade in Indianapolis and nearby 
places. There will be many special prizes. In fact, every 
effort is being made to insure the complete success of the en- 
durance run, the track races and the convention itself. 

The park in which the track is located has an area of 3,228 
acres and the buildings number 41, including grand stands, 
garages, machine shops, storage for fuel and oil, cafes, club 
houses, office buildings, aerodomes, and the like. The length 
of the outer circuit is two and a half miles and the inner 
course is of similar length, the track having a surface of 
gravel and crushed stone to be bound with an application of 
300,000 gallons of asphalt oil. The grand stands will accom- 
modate 25,000 persons, the entire grounds 200,000. The park- 
ing space for motor cars will accommodate 10,000 machines. 
Space for 3,000 horses has been provided. More than three 
miles of fencing enclose the grounds. The lighting system 
for illuminating the track for 24-hour contests includes nine 
miles of piping, to be used with Prest-O-Lite gas. Four 
miles of six-inch gas mains have been laid to obtain gas 
for inflating balloons. The timing will be by electricity, the 
system and scoreboard costing $10,000. A mile and a half of 
railroad siding has been constructed in the grounds that spe- 
cial cars may be brought within the enclosure. The press 
stand is three stories, the upper for reporting the races, the 
second for telegraph operators and the lower with facilities 
for photographers to develop their pictures. The track is 
50 feet wide on the stretches and 50 feet at the turns and is 
banked for a speed of 120 miles an hour. 



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APPROACHING THE STARTING LINE. 



FRED VOELKER, ON HIS N. S. U. 




WALTER OUEKKE 
WHO MADE FAST- 
EST TIME. 



STANLEY T. KELLOGG 



TAKEN JUST BEFORE 
KELLOGG'S ACCI- 
DENT. 




A. G. CHAPPLE, CAPTAIN, N. Y. M, C. 



A LINE-UP OF SPECTATORS. 



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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE JLLUSTR ATED 



GOERKE AND VOELKER BEST CLIMBERS 

They Divide Honors in the Seven Events Under the Auspices of the New York 
Club — Kellogg and Chappie Almost as Fast — Former Slightly Injured 



IDEAL weather and otherwise entirely appropriate con- 
ditions, fine riding and broken records, two hours of 
pros and cons in a controversy involving the long-dis- 
cussed distinctions between stock and racing machines — 
these were the most striking characteristics of the sev- 
enth national hill climb conducted at Hastings-on-the- 
Hudson on Saturday, June 19th, under the auspices of 
the New York Motorcycle Club. Honors were about 
equally divided between Goerke, Indian rider, and 
Voelker, the intrepid N. S. U. racing representative, while 
the possibility of Kellogg's capturing a first, on a Merkel, 
was eliminated because of an accident in the run-off of 
a tie in the big event of the day. 

The hill, beautifully adapted to the purpose, is 1,950 
feet long from the starting point to the finish, the road- 
bed of almost all of it being as smooth as a hardwood 
floor. The ascent averages seventeen per cent., and the 
curves are so artistically arranged as to satisfy the long- 
ings of the most ardent aspirant to distinction in this 
class of competition. The use of the hill, part of River 
View Manor, was secured, through the efforts of C. A. Mari- 
ani, the club's press agent, from the Hastings Home Com- 
pany. The entire length of the hill is 2,800 feet, of which 
there were slightly less than 2,000 feet, about two-fifths 
of a mile, between the two telephones at which the starter 
and the timers were respectively stationed. 

The best time for the afternoon was made by Walter 
Goerke on an Indian twin. He negotiated the distance 
in 2i^i seconds. Kellogg, mounted on the Merkel with 
which, a week before, he had broken the Point Breeze 
track 25-mile record by three minutes, tied Goerke's first 
performance of 23 seconds in the 6r class. It was while 
attempting to better this in an effort to defeat the Indian 
speedster that Kellogg had the misfortune of experien- 
cing an ugly smash-up. Because of the unintentional par- 
ticipation in the circumstances which combined to bring 
about the accident Dr. Thornley, chairman of the F. A. M. 
competition committee, promptly notified Chappie of his 
suspension for thirty days. 

The first event was to have been started at one o'clock, 
but it was nearly three when the first man was officially 
sent up the hill. In the interval R. S. Morton had suc- 
ceeded R. G. Betts to the refereeship, the latter having 
precipitated a rather vigorous discussion of the ever-pres- 
ent stock racing machine bugaboo. The upshot of it all 
was that Betts resigned, and that his successor solved the 
problem fairly satisfactorily by disqualifying Chappie in the 
Class B event, on the ground that the mount he had entered 
was fitted with auxiliary ports. 

In Class A, for catalogued stock machines, the piston 
displacement of the engines of which did not exceed 24 
cubic inches piston displacement, Voelker, on the little 
19-inch N. S. U. twin, was an easy winner. Voelker's 
riding and the performance of his diminutive mount were 
nothing short of a revelation. After Goerke had bettered 
the 46 seconds made by Cardwell (R.-S.) by \ 2 A sec- 
onds Voelker astonished the gathering by making the 
distance in the wonderful time of 33^, just eight sec- 
onds faster than Goerke had ridden. 

Voelker, though his time was one-fifth of a second 
slower in the next event, again defeated Goerke, though 
by only four-fifths of a second, in the competition for 
30.50 cubic inch stock machines. Chappie rode up the 
hill in 29 seconds; he was disqualified, however. Third 
place went to Kenneth Moore of Montclair, who had 
captured the highest prize in the big endurance run re- 
cently conducted under the auspices of the New Jersey 
Club. Moore rode an Excelsior. 



It was with the third event, a free-for-all for machines 
with a piston displacement not exceeding 30.50 cubic 
inches, that Goerke came into his own. In fact, he won 
four firsts right in order, though in all but one the com- 
petition was close. Goerke's time of 26ji seconds in 
Class C was only two-fifths of a second better than 
Chappie's performance. Moore "nosed" out Kellogg for 
third position. The fourth event, for 50 cubic inches, cat- 
alogued stock machines, had nine entries, Goerke win- 
ning quite easily in 24^ seconds, two seconds better 
than Chappie's time, and faster by sVs seconds than, thai ' 
of Cook, who, also riding an Indian, reached tfre-.fi^iShirig 
line in 30 seconds flat. "•.*•!• *•• "* 

The honors in the last stock machine eve.nV*w # er£ fga-ftO 
monopolized by Goerke and Chappie, their t&5£& fctufgr' 
25 and 26^ seconds, respectively. Logan (Nl &' u) 
was third, in 29^ seconds. • •".."/•". 

Class F brought out the big racing machine's, (pC-tRe 
most exciting event of the day, and produced Vhe only 
accident during the afternoon. Wonderful accomplish- 
ments were anticipated, nor were the spectators disap- 
pointed. Goerke was the first to be started off, and when 
the timers had made their comparisons it was announced 
that the little Indian speedster had annihilated all pre- 
vious records by doing the 1,950 feet, 17 per cent, grade, 
in 23 seconds flat. Chappie could do no better than 29 
seconds, and then Kellogg flashed across the starting 
line on the big Merkel, the machine upon which the Sat- 
urday previous he had awakened new interest in the 
sport through his startling performance on the Point 
Breeze track. Kellogg made the curves with consum- 
mate skill, just as Goerke had done, and finished in ex- 
actly the same time as had his competitor, viz., just 23 
seconds. 

After Mapp (Indian) had captured third place in 26 
seconds Goerke was again sent up the hill to dispose 
of the tie. Fearlessly did he drive that big twin prac- 
tically to the limit of its speeding possibilities. His con- 
trol was perfection itself. It was plain to the onlookers 
that he was doing better than in his first trial. As a 
matter of fact, he succeeded in clipping more than a sec- 
ond from his first attempt, being timed for 21^, an aver- 
age of nearly 60 miles an hour. 

As Kellogg, his machine having attained almost full 
speed by that time, approached the starting line, it 
swerved dangerously near the curb, where stood Chappie 
with his machine, and Mapp. The former, in an effort 
to get out of the way, dropped his mount, Kellogg graz- 
ing it hard enough to cause him to run almost squarely 
into the curb. When the mass had been untangled it was 
found that Harry Mapp had suffered a badly sprained 
ankle, and Kellogg several cuts on the face and a num- 
ber of bruises. Fortunately the popular Stanley was not 
seriously injured and was soon back to New York, at- 
tending to business, as cheerful and chipper as ever. Bear- 
ing upon this accident Motorcycle Illustrated is in receipt 
of two letters which are self-explanatory, as follows : 

"Mr. A. G. Chappie, 

"Grand Central Station, New York: 
"My Dear Chappie: 

"I hope that you will believe me when I say that it is 
my most unpleasant duty to call your attention to Arti- 
cle XVII, Sec. 8, of the Competition Rules. It is doubly 
unpleasant because I consider you a friend, and because 
we are both members of the same club. 

"As a contestant you had absolutely no business en the 
course last Saturday when Stanley Kellogg was injured 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909. 



by running into you. While I do not for an instant be- 
lieve that you would try to justify yourself by the plea 
that you were also an official and had a right to be 
where you were, yet I will point out the fact that no 
official duty could have justified your presence with your 
machine where you were, in the road several feet from 
the curb, on the outer side of the curve, directly in the 
path, where it was a moral certainty that a high-power 
machine would have to pass when rounding the curve at 
high speed. 

"I wish to say that I personally saw most of what oc- 
curred and am firmly of the opinion that you had no in- 
tention of causing injury to Kellogg; yet a little more 
care and consideration on your part would have avoided 
all the trouble and saved you from being nearly responsi- 
ble for a shocking and unnecessary tragedy. 

\ I /"I know that no penalty inflicted by the committee 

}couJo7 p/iaj^h you half as much as your own regret for 

wh.*>f :h*as«Jiji£{>ened. We therefore suspend you for the 

/sJiV|te,st*fTOe/the rules permit, namely, thirty days dating 

• " tr ®^i ippfl including June 20th; not as a punishment, but 
as a'soltemn warning to you and to others. 

', .• ??$?& committee also reprimands you for riding a dis- 
* Qunli^etf* machine up the hill in direct defiance of the 



referee* 



"I am very sincerely yours, 

"J. P. THORNLEY, 
"Chairman Competition Committee. 



"Editor Motorcycling Illustrated: 

"On account of the various stories being circulated re- 
garding the accident at the New York Motorcycle Club's 
hill climb, in which the writer was somewhat shaken up, 
I feel that in justice to the parties involved in the stories 
it is up to me to make a statement regarding the affair. 

"I do not in any way hold Mr. Chappie responsible 
for the accident, further than being on the course at 
that point, and his explanation for being there is entirely 
satisfactory to me. 

"All I can say regarding the accident is that it was 
caused by a most unfortunate combination of circum- 
stances. I trust your paper will publish this letter in 
full, and by so doing assist me in explaining the acci- 
dent properly. 

"I further wish to add that the newspapers greatly ex- 
aggerated the seriousness of the accident, as I am able 
to be about, and hope to be entirely recovered in a week 
or two. 

"Very truly yours, 

"STANLEY KELLOGG. 



The last event, run under Callender's formula, the fig- 
ure of merit being based upon the relation of weight of rider 
and machine to piston displacement and elapsed time, was 
won by Voelker. Goerke was second, and Sicard (Thor) 
third. The summaries: 

Class A. — Stock machines, 24 cubic inches or less: First, 
Voelker (N. S. U.), .33H ; second, Goerke (Indian), 
.41^; third, Cardwell (R. S.), .46; Chappie (Ind.), 1.08^. 

Class B. — Stock machines, 30.50 cubic inches or less: 
First, Voelker (N. S. U.), .33$i'* second, Goerke (Ind.), 
.34^5; third, Moore (Excel.), .37; Kellogg (Excel.), .38; 
Curtiss (Curtiss), .40; Cardwell (R. S.), .46^. 

Class C. — Free-for-all, machines of 30.50 cubic inches 
or less: First, Goerke (Ind.), .26^; second, Chappie 
(Ind.), 265^; third, Moore (Excel.), .36; fourth, Kellogg 
(Excel.), .37*i 

Class D. — Stock machines, 50 cubic inches or less: 
First, Goerke (Ind.), .24^; second, Chappie (Ind.), 
.26^; third, Cook (Ind.), .30; Scoda (Ind.), .31; Logan 
(N. S. U.), .31H; Rice (Ind.), .31^; Drummond (Ind.), 
.32; Cardwell (R. S.), .38. Van Keuron started, but did 
not finish. 

Class E. — Stock machines, not^ exceeding 61: First, 
Goerke (Ind.), .25; second, Chappie (Ind.), .26^; third, 
Logan (N. S. U.), .29^; Christien (Curtiss), .31; Cook 
(Ind.), .31; Purdy (Curtiss), .31JI 

Class F. — Free-for-all, not exceeding 61: First, Goerke 
(Ind.), .21 ji; second, Kellogg (Merkel), .23; third, Mapp 
(Ind.), .26; Voelker (N. S. U.). .28; Chappie (Ind.), .29. 

Class G. — According to Callender's formula, lowest 
percentage wins. 



4> 



u 

S a 
«» .22 






.5 £ £ .5 

.s bo I; to !c 

Voelker N. S. U. 137 120^ 19.2 .35 2.61 

Goerke Indian 136 153 19.3 ' .42^ 2.86 

Sicard Thor 141 171 y 2 19.3 .58^ 3.62 

Moore Excel. 120.5 185 29 .38^ 3^3 

Rice Indian 132.5 150 38.6 .32^ 4.48 

Voelker's wonderful riding in the first and second events 
was done on a machine the piston displacement of which 
is only 19 cubic inches. Another feature was the perform- 
ance of the 5-h.p. Indian, assembled by the Frank B. Wid- 
mayer Company, and upon which Mapp rode third in 
the free-for-all, defeating several 7-h.p. machines. Generally 
speaking, the work of both riders and machines was praise- 
worthy; in fact, remarkable. 



LOS ANGELES. — The five-lap bicycle track at Fiesta 
Park, built for bicycle racing, has been tried of late at 
each meet for motorcycle events. The F. A. M. limit for these 
small tracks is 4 h.p. and under, and Derkum, Lingenfelder 
and other expert riders consider the track dangerous for even 
4-h.p. machines at full speed. 

On May 30 and 31 Graves and Ward rode on 5-h.p. 
machines, but did not attempt full speed, as Graves, in 
trying the track, doing a mile in .54, had nearly gone 
off the top on the beginning of the homestretch. The first 
night meet was held June 5. A three-mile professional race 
was arranged between Lingenfelder and Mitchel, the former 
riding the 6-h.p. N. S. U., and Mitchel the 5-h.p. Indian belong- 
ing to Derkum. The time was only 5 :o4^. Then Graves did 



a two-mile exhibition alone, and another with Ward, on a 
home-made machine that stood handy. 

Tuesday evening of last week, night racing was resumed 
but petered out by Thursday night. Tuesday night Mitchel 
fell in the 5-mile, which was won by Agraz in 6:19. Graves 
Loge and Ward rode an amateur two-mile in 2:14^. 

On Wednesday night, there was a two-mile race for 
machines of 27 cu. in., and when Balke opened up his 
stock road machine on the lower turn the rear wheel slid 
around and gave him a nasty fall. The bell on the handle 
bar caught his left hand and made a deep cut. Graves won 
in 2:26^. Then there was a five-mile 5-h.p. amateur race 
to finish the evening program, which was ridden in 5:48 by 
Graves, Seymour and Loge. 



BROCKTON, Mass. — A 25-mile race may be held in 
Brockton before the summer ends. George A. 
Gove and other members of the Brockton Motor- 
cycle Club have discussed the matter. If the race is held, 
it would probably be over the Torrey street-North Easton 
course and fast riders from all parts of the State will be 
invited to compete. 



TACOMA, Wash. — George Cole, of this city, is making 
a transcontinental tour. He left Tacoma the first 
week of last month, and will follow eastward the route 
laid out by the New York-Seattle Automobile pathfinder. 
Cole is not trying to establish any records, but is making 
the trip with a view to seeing the country, and also to se- 
curing cheap and attractive transportation to England. 



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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



HEARTY VICTORS OVER FATHER TIME 




IF W. R. Crossman of 803 Wood street, Decatur, 111., 
isn't the oldest rider in the country, we want to be 
made aware of the fact. Mr. Crossman is 75 years of 
age. He rides a Yale z l /i h.p., and thinks no more of 
tearing off 35 or 40 miles than he would of walking into 
town. This septuagenarian writes us as follows : 

"I shall never be too old to ride a motorcycle. There 
is nothing I enjoy more than a 40 or 50-mile journey 
awheel. I do not find it dangerous at all, for a motor- 
cycle is really more easily controlled than a bicycle. I 
am simply 75 years young, not old. With a beautiful 
home, money to loan and my machine, what more could 
a man desire?" 




UDOP" STOUT, of Oakland, Cal., is the oldest man 
1 riding a motorcycle in the State. He has planned 
a trip to Copperopolis, Calaveras County, Cal., via Hay- 
wards, Livermore, Stockton and Farmington, for July 
4th and 5th, on his Harley-Davidson. He will be ac- 
companied by his nephew, Walter Stuart, who will ride 
in a side-car. This is a 300-mile trip. 

"Pop" has been riding a motorcycle for six years. He 
has the car fastened on the left side of the motorcycle, 
he having found from experience that the machine oper- 
ates and steers much easier with the car fastened on the 
left side. These two "vets" are fine object lessons to timid 
mammas of lusty boys. 



MADISON, Wis. — According to the Milwaukee Free 
Press, fourteen gasoline engines of an entirely new 
model and applicable to marine and motorcycle use are 
being built by students in the College of Engineering of the 
University of Wisconsin. The engines, which will be the 
property of the students, are being made from models de- 
signed by Paul Sladdy, instructor in mechanical practice, 
and include seven single and four double cylinder marine 
engines and two double and one single cylinder motor- 
cycle engines. 

A TEST made by the United States Government shows 
that motorcyclists and horsemen require about the 
same distance to bring their mounts to a stop. A skilled 
cavalryman going 25 miles an hour brought his steed to a 
halt within 152 feet, while a motorcycle rider travelling 
at 40 miles an hour came to a stop within 147 fet. 



««IT has occurred to us," says Motorcycle, of London, "inas- 
1 much as a comparatively noisy engine can be rendered 
much more silent merely by adjustment of the carbureter, that 
like improvement might be made to the average motorcycle 
engine by careful research and experiment in the same direc- 
tion. That different carbureters cause engines to make more 
or less noise at the exhaust is common knowledge. In a 
word, the best results are secured by the provision of a cor- 
rect mixture at all engine speeds. No carbureter actually 
does this, but the one which most nearly approximates to it 
will, other things being equal, approach nearest to the ideal. 
The carbureter bears an important role in the consumption 
of fuel, and one that does not allow the spirit to be thorough- 
ly vaporized must cause a considerable waste of fuel, with 
consequent greater heat and noise from the engine. Also, 
when the air is most perfectly carburetted, the less volume 
there is required to propel the engine, and the heat is re- 
duced, making lubrication more efficient." 



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July 1. 1909. 




TWENTY RECORDS BY LINGENFELDER. 

Riding an N. S. U., at Los Angeles, He Carries 
Everything Before Him, Establishing New Fig- 
ures for All Distances Between Five and Twen- 
ty-five Miles, with One Exception — Graves De- 
feated by Seymour, Who, on a Reading Stand- 
ard, Hangs Up Four New Amateur Figures. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Whenever races are run on the Coli- 
seum track here, it naturally follows that records must go. 
This has been the rule since the three and a half-lap track 
was opened March 14 last by Jack Prince. Accordingly, on 
the 20th both professional and amateur records, 24 in all, 
were broken. Of these 20 were captured by Eddie Lingen- 
felder on the 7-h.p. N. S. U. The big feature was the 50-milc 
point race, consisting of a 10-mile, a 15-mile and a 25-mile 
heat, with six entries. Derkum, on an R.-S., Lingenfelder 
on an N. S. U., and Mitchell riding De Rosier's former record- 
breaking Indian, were scratch men. Ray Duer, on a 5-h.p. 
Thor, Frank Barnett, on the 4-h.p. Elk, and Emil Agraz. 
on the 4-h.p. Thor, were given handicaps. Duer had tried 
for the p&ced bicycle record behind a 20-h.p. Anzani, just 
before the first heat, and so did not start, while Barnett's 
mount was put. out of commission by an amateur in the first 
race, so that Agraz, on the fast Thor single, was the only con- 
testant with a handicap, and by the consistent performance of 
his machine he was able to score enough points to win third 
place. 

Derkum's machine had begun the day in fine shape. It 
was pushed too hard, however, in the 10-mile amateur 
event, when Seymour outrode Graves and broke four records, 
as follows: Four-miles, 3:17; seven miles, 5:45^; eight miles, 
6* :35$i ; nine miles, 7 :2$ l A> Both used the machine for the mile 
record trials and, for lack of proper oiling, burned out the 
rings, so that in the second heat of the big race Derkum had 
to abandon the overworked Reading Standard and fall back 
on the 4-h.p. single R.-S. 

Arthur Mitchel, the Newark pacemaker, made his debut 
on one of Jake De Rosier's fast Indian sevens, a machine 
on which many records have been made by both De Rosier 
and Huyck. All Mitchel could do was to score a half lap more 
than Derkum in the 10-mile race, being lapped twice by 
Lingenfelder. In the 15-mile event, Lingenfelder lapped Mit- 
chel ten times, Mitchel having a soft tire, while in the 25- 
mile Mitchel got only fourth prize money. 

Derkum and Agraz were both given 15 laps handicap in the 
25-mile race as both rode 4-h.p. machines, but Derkum made 
such a good ride on the four that he lapped Agraz six 
times, and though he was passed 12 times by Lingenfelder 
on the 7-h.p. N. S. U., Derkum won this heat, giving him 
points enough in the three heats to win second money over 
Mitchel and Agraz. 

The scoring was 10 points to first, and six, four and two 
points to the others in the 10-mile: 15, 10, six and four points 
respectively for the first four men in the 15-mile, and 25 points, 
15, 10 and five in the 25-mile race. This gave Lingenfelder 
a total of 40; Derkum. 33; Agraz, 22, and Mitchel, 17. 

The professional records began to go in the 10-mile race, 
when Lingenfelder cut the four-mile competition record to 
3:14^. The time by miles was: one, :5o; two, 1:38; three, 
2:26; four, 3*i4fS; nve, 4:03^; six, 4:52; seven, 5:40^; 
eight, 6:29; nine, 7:17^; ten, 8:06^. 

In the 15-mile every mile after the second was a new com- 
petition record except the fourth, fifth and tenth miles. 
Lingenfelder's first mile was 51 l /i seconds, and the second, 
1:38, the same as in the 10-mile, but the third mile, 2:25^ 
was record time, as was the sixth, and all the rest but the 
tenth, the time by miles being: Six, 4:50^; seven, 5:38^5; 
eight, 6:26^; nine, 7 :i5f^ ; ten, 8:06^; eleven, 8:55^; 
twelve, 9:45; thirteen, 10:374^; fourteen, 11:32^; fifteen, 



EDDIE LINGENFELDER. 

12:28. In this race Derkum's front cylinder piston dis- 
connected in the eleventh lap and stopped the machine. 
He withdrew from the track, and an investigation showed 
it to be impossible to use the machine again during the 
meet. , 

The 25-mile heat was full of interest, Derkum and Agraz 
on single cylinders doing their best to make speed, and 
Mitchel and Lingenfelder on the big machine eating 'em 
up, though, after the second mile Mitchell was lapped by 
the singles. Time by miles: One, :5i4~5; two, 1:41; three, 
2:31 2-5; four, 3:21 1-5; five, 4:13; six, 5:03 3-5; seven, 
5^55 4-5; eighth, 6:47; nine, 7:38 3-5; ten, 8:31; eleven, 
9:22 1-5; twelve, 10:13; thirteen, 11:04 1-5; fourteen, 
11:56 1-5; fifteen, 12:49; sixteen, 13:40 2-5 v seventeen, 
14:32 2-5; eighteen, 15:24 1-5; nineteen, 16:16 T-5; twenty, 
17:08 2-5; twenty-one, 18:00 2-5; twenty-two, 18:52 1-5; 
twenty-three, 19*42; twenty-four, 20:32 3-5; twenty-five 
miles, 21:24. All new records after the fifteenth, except 
the 20th mile. 

The amateur surprise of the day was the defeat of 
Graves by Raymond Seymour, the Reading Standard ama- 
teur rider. In the mile exhibition, flying start, Seymour 
did 47 seconds to Graves' 47 1-5, Graves using his Indian. 
In this event Lingenfelder got a poor start, but made 
48 3-5- while Derkum did the mile in 47 2-5, just a fifth of 
a second slower than the record. 

The first race of the day was the four-mile open for 
four horse power machines. This event has usually gone 
to "Fearless" Balke and his wonderful 4-h.p. Thor, but this 
time Seymour defeated both Balke and Frank Loge, the 
latter using a 4-h.p. Elk. Time 3:45. Balke had trouble 
working his oiler, one hand being bandaged on account 
of his accident on Fiesta Park track Wednesday night. 

The six-mile amateur for machines of 48 cubic inch 
piston displacement or under went to Balke on the 5-h.p. 
Thor. with a half lap handicap, in a hot race all the way, 
against Seymour, on an R-S. 4-h.p., Seymour being allowed 
three-fourths of a lap handicap. Loge, on the 5-h.p. Indian 
used by Derkum last year, won third place from scratch. 
Ward, on the N. S. U. and Kohl on the Elk, dropped out 
during the race. The time was 5:25 3-5. An eight-mile 
amateur open race went to Balke, on the 5-hp. Thor, after 
a close race with Seymour, who got second by a small 
margin from Loge. Time 7:29 4-5. 

ENGLISH riders of racing machines are adopting the 
somewhat unsightly practice of drilling their machines 
with holes in the frame and pulleys, in order to reduce the 
weight, several of the high-powered racing cycles at Brook- 
lands being drilled in this manner almost to danger point. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 






RULES FOR BIG WESTERN RELIABILITY RUN 

Conditions Insure a Thorough Test of Machines 





xtxxxxxtxsxx 



THE Chicago Club's reliability run, planned for last 
week, has been postponed until July 8, 9 and 10. The 
run will be the most important motorcycle test ever held 
in the West. Among the machines which will be repre- 
sented will be the Yale, Merkel, Thor, Indian, Harley- 
Davidson and Excelsior. The Indian team consists of 
Van Sickle, Lyon and Huyck; the Excelsior riders will be 
Woodworth, Lyon and De Salvo, while the Harley-David- 
idson team consists of Lang, Crolius and Davidson. The 
test will consist of three hard days' runs, each ending in 
Chicago. The first is to be to South Bend and back, the 
second to Rock ford and return and the third to Ottawa 
and back. 

The following is a synopsis of the rules and regulations 
covering the run : 

The entry fee is $10 per man of each team, with $10 added, 
making the entry $40 for each team. Of this amount $10 will 
be set aside as the prize fund. Entries to be made up of 
three-man teams entered by manufacturers or dealers. All 
riders must be amateurs in good standing in the F. A. M. 

The machines are to be strictly stock roadsters with full 
equipment, as per regular catalogue specifications and, 
whether listed or not, all machines must carry efficient mufflers 
that are to be closed at all times and opened only subject to 
disqualification. All contesting machines must be submitted 
to the racing committee for sealing at such places as they may 
specify at least 48 hours before the starting of the race. It will 
lie within the jurisdiction of the committee to reject any 
machine not in their judgment meeting the requirements of 
a strictly stock roadster. No machine fitted with auxiliary 
exhaust ports or with the cylinders bored out, or otherwise 
altered, will be allowed. 

All machines will be sealed by the committee, seals to cover 
tool kits, battery boxes, spark plugs, timers, and all other 
parts liable to adjustment within the judgment of the com- 
mittee. No tools or spare parts are to be carried or used 
by the contestant except such as may be carried within the 
regular tool kit or compartment of the machine covered by the 
official seal. 

The schedule for each day will be so arranged as to pro- 
vide an average speed of 20 miles per hour between checking 
controls as established by the committee. Each contestant 
will be provided with a route card on which will be given the 
time to pass all stated checking points. The contest com- 
mittee will locate blind checking stations at their discretion 
in order to see that an average speed as near as possible is 
maintained. 

Each contestant will be allowed, under penalty hereinafter 
provided, a delay not to exceed a total of one half hour during 
a day. In the event of such delay the other men of the team 
shall proceed as follows : 

On being required to stop by any contestant in trouble they 
shall immediately note on their route cards the time of such 
stop. They will then watch carefully and note on their cards 
whatever work may be done on the delayed contestant's ma- 
chine. They should note the breaking of any seals and the 
character of the work done. Upon the delayed contestant's an- 
nouncing he is ready to proceed, they shall note the time on 
their cards, after which the delayed contestant shall sign both 
the other contestants' cards, thus acknowledging the charge 
against him. They will then proceed, carrying out the schedule 
originally set forth, excepting the period of the delay. 

In the event of any contestant being delayed beyond his 
allotted half hour, the other contestants of that riding team 



shall proceed and the delayed contestant shall be penalized 250 
points for falling out of his place. Unless he shall be able 
to make repairs and proceed, making all subsequent controls 
in not to exceed two hours delay, he shall be disqualified 
from further competition and be declared out of the contest 
In the event of so doing and finishing within the required 
time, his machine will be resealed by the committee and he 
will be allowed to start on the following and subsequent 
days, subject to the penalties thus incurred. 

In the event of two members of any riding team dropping 
out during the day, thus becoming disqualified under the regu- 
lations, the surviving rider shall report to the next control 
and there await and join the following team, riding with them 
for the rest of the day and on their running time. 

Should a competitor who has used up the half hour delay 
allowed him be able to continue, but with his machine still in- 
capacitated, he may, upon the stopping of either of the other 
contestants, make use of the time of such delay in repairing 
his own machine and the time thus spent will be checked on 
the two competitors' cards and the delay subject to a double 
penalty. 

Should a team be delayed by such outside conditions, as 
roads being closed by trains, or other impassable obstructions, 
the time of such delay will be noted by all three riders and on 
their joint statement of such delay, and will be allowed on 
their running schedule. There must, however, be.no repairs 
made during this delay except by a member who has already 
utilized the half hour allowed, in which event he shall take the 
benefit of this delay at double penalty. In the event of one 
or two members of the team being cut off by such obstruction, 
the leader or leaders having passed, those having passed the 
obstruction shall wait for those delayed and the time noted 
the same as though the entire team had been delayed. 

The penalties: For breaking seals, 50 points each; for 
work on a machine or any part thereof, one point for each 
minute up to the limit of half an hour; for time working on 
machine after the expiration of the half hour, the contestant 
not having fallen behind the balance of his team, two points 
per minute; for making replacements, such as spark plugs, 
timer parts, or any part of the machine, time shall be charged 
double, that is, two points per minute; for failing to keep 
up to schedule with the balance of the team, 250 points. 

The three running competitors of each team must keep 
together or at least within a distance of 200 yards between 
the first and last man. It will be seen that their arrival at 
controls must be practically simultaneous. Should the entire 
team arrive more than five minutes behind the schedule time, 
taking into consideration the delays hereinbefore men- 
tioned, the entire team will be penalized one point each for 
each minute delay thereafter. Should they arrive more than 
three minutes ahead of schedule time, with the same con- 
sideration for delay, they shall be penalized two points for 
each minute in advance thereof. 

It is the purpose of this run to hold the contestants posi- 
tively to a 20 mile per hour schedule and not to allow con- 
testants to make up for lost time or gain time and wait outside 
checking station. 

There will be no penalty for tire repairs, and in the event 
of delays of this sort, a contestant in trouble may have the 
assistance of both his riding mates to facilitate procedure at 
the earliest possible moment. The time thus used shall be 
checked on all three cards and the team will thereafter ride 
that much behind the card schedule but without penalization 
for the delay, nor does such delay count within the half 
hour allowed for repairs as above specified. 



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Jew 1, 1909. 



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WWWM>««*««*««*W**W«V 



THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE LAW 

; Legislation In the Different States Varies from the Point of Absolute Indifference 
1 to that of Severely Exacting, Even Oppressive Provisions — A 

Brief Synopsis of the U. S, Motor Vehicle Laws 



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WE publish herewith a symposium of the laws in 
effect in the various States of the Union, in so far 
as they have to do with the registration and driving of 
motorcycles. The brief particulars which we give, while 
dry in a way, are nevertheless interesting. Comparison 
shows that there is a great variation and that the laws 
of many States, from a motorcycle standpoint, are totally 
inadequate. This is particularly true of such statutes as 
do not fairly distinguish between the four and the two- 
wheelers. Jn such cases two evils are the result, viz.: 
either the motorcyclist is oppressed because of unfair re- 
quirements, or he is permitted an excess of liberty. One 
condition is quite as bad as the ottier, for in the first in- 
stance you have actual persecution, and in the second a 
situation which inevitably leads to the enactment of that 
sort of legislation. In any event, we have gone to the 
trouble of securing this information at this time because 
we believe it may be of value to those who take part in 
the F. A. M. convention early next month. It may be 
decided to let "well enough alone," though it is a grave 
question whether prevailing conditions are "well enough/' 
However, here arc the laws: 

Alabama. — Automobile law applies to motorcycles. 
Speed limits 8 miles an hour. License fee 25 cents; ex- 
tra charges made by some of the cities. There is no pro- 
vision as to the size of license numbers, nor are there 
any exemptions to non-residents. 

Arkansas. — "We have no motor vehicle laws here," 
writes Mr. O. C. Ludwig, Secretary of State. 

Connecticut. — The motorcycle is specially recognized 
by the Legislature. The "reasonable and proper" speed 
provision is enforced, though travelling at a rate of more 
than 25 miles an hour Is technically considered reckless 
driving. Licenses are required both for the machine and 
for the operator, the annual fee being 50 cents in each 
case. Persons under 18 years of age cannot obtain li- 
censes. Registration numbers must be at least one inch 
in height. Open mufflers prohibited. Law strictly en- 
forced. 

Delaware.- The law distinguishes between automobiles 
and motorcycles with reference to the registration fee, 
motorcyclists having to pay $3 a year. The "rear number 
tags shall be attached so that they may be plainly read 
from both sides of the motorcycle, instead of being at- 
tached to the front and rear." Speed limits, 12 to 15 miles 
an hour. 1'enalty, fine of $10 to $25 for first offense. 

District of Columbia*— With the exception of the tail 
lamp provision, the automobile law applies to motorcy- 
cles. Speed limits, 12 to 15 miles an hour. Licenses 
obtainable only after prospective rider has passed an ex- 
amination. License tags, 4*9 inches; fee. $2 per year. 
No exemptions. Laws are strictly enforced. The Na- 
tional Capitol Motorcycle Club, of Washington, is en- 
deavoring to have these regulations modified, particu- 
larly witli respect to the si7e of the license tags. 

Florida.- Motorcycle included with the automobile. 
Annual registration fee $2. License numbers must be 
carried; no provision as to their size. 

Georgia.— Secretary of State Cook writes that the Leg- 
islature will in all probability pass an automobile law this 



session. Just at present there is no motor vehicle legis- 
lation on the statute books here. 

Illinois* — Speed limits, 10 to 20 miles, depending upon 
density of population. Motorcycle license fee, $2. Lamps, 
horns and brakes required. License tags made up of numerals 
and letters not less than one inch in height. 

Indiana* — Registration fee, $1. Speed limit, 8 to 20 
miles an hour. Brake, bell or horn, and lamp are re- 
quired. Numbers and letters, 3 and 4 inches in height, 
respectively, must be displayed on the rear of one's ma- 
chine. Exemption to non-residents. Penalty, first of- 
fense, fine of from $50 to $100. 

Iowa* — The word "motorcycles'* appears only once in the 
motor vehicle laws of this State. That is in section 
I57I-B, which provides that "the fee for registering a 
motorcycle shall be $2 only." Otherwise the little two- 
wheeler seems to be under all provisions which apply to 
the automobile, including the size of the tag displaying 
license numbers. It is provided that these numbers be at 
least three inches in height and at least one-half inch in 
width. The speed limits are from 10 to 20 miles an hour. 
Brakes, bell or horn, and lamps are required. 

Kentucky. — The motorcycle is in the same class with 
the automobile. Speed limits, 15 miles an hour. No li- 
censes are now required, but it is probable that the next 
Legislature will adopt a law providing for the registra- 
tion of all motor vehicles. 

Maine. — The laws of this State are to the effect that 
the term "automobile" applies to all motor vehicles pro- 
pelled by power. The speed limits are 8 miles an hour 
in the cities and 15 miles an hour elsewhere. A "suit- 
able bell or other appliance for giving notice" is required; 
also lamps between one hour after sunset and one hour 
before sunrise. Infraction of the law is punished by a 
fine not exceeding $50, or by imprisonment for not ex- 
ceeding ten days. On both automobiles and motorcycles 
license numbers must be so placed as to be "always plainly 
visible." The annual license fee is $2. 

Maryland. — A new bill will be presented to the Legis- 
lature some time next fall. At present there is no law- 
applying either directly or otherwise to the motorcycle. 
Technically speaking, there are no motorcycle speed lim- 
its, nor are licenses required. 

Massachusetts. — Under the new law, the initial license 
fee is $2; renewals cost 50 cents. A metal seal two inches in 
diameter is required for purposes of identification. Exemptions 
are granted to non-residents. The penalties are severe, and 
the law is strictly enforced. 

Michigan. — While the Michigan motor vehicle law of 
1907 has been held by the Supreme Court to be applicable 
to the motorcycle, the first of the new year will usher in 
a law specially drafted to affect motorcyclists. The pres- 
ent law, which was passed in 1907, makes the speed limits 
25 miles an hour in the country, 15 miles in municipalities, 
and 8 miles in closely settled business districts. A license 
certificate and seal are required. They are furnished 
by the State upon payment of $1, renewal to cost 50 cents 
per year. The law calls for three-inch* figures and two- 
inch letters, but this provision has been modified in many 



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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



instances by local authorities. This applies also to the 
court's interpretation of the statute regarding lamps. The 
municipal police do not insist upon the use of both a 
head light and tail light. 

Minnesota. — Section i of the Automobile Laws of this 
State provides that the "term motor vehicle includes all 
vehicles propelled by any other than muscular power." 
It is evident, however, that the act in its entirety is not 
enforced against motorcyclists, inasmuch as Section 10 
provides that the certificate of registration to be affixed 
to motor vehicles shall be made up of letters and numer- 
als 8Vi inches in length and 5 inches wide. The regis- 
tration fee is $1.50 a year. Brakes, horns, lamps, etc., are 
required. Non-residents who conform with the laws of 
their own States are exempt while passing through this 
commonwealth. The speed limit varies from 8 to 25 
miles an hour. 

Mississippi. — This State has no laws governing the pro- 
pulsion of either automobiles or motorcycles. 

Missouri. — This is another of the many States which 
include motorcycles in the term "motor vehicles," and the 
laws of which thereupon proceed to make general regula- 
tions which should apply only to automobiles. Owners 
of motor vehicles are compelled to pay a $5 fee and op- 
erators $2 per annum. Exemptions are granted to non- 
residents. Brakes and a suitable horn, bell or other sig- 
nal device are required. The registration numbers must 
be at least i}/ 2 inches in height. The speed limits vary 
from 6 to 15 miles an hour. The penalty for infraction 
of the law, first offense, is a fine of not less than $25 nor 
more than $100. 

Montana. — The Secretary of State writes that there is 
"no State law of any kind. Cities make their own laws." 

Nebraska. — Automobile law is applicable to motorcy- 
cles. Annual fee $1. License numbers must be plainly 
displayed. Non-residents exempt. Speed limits 10 miles 
within municipal bounds and 20 miles elsewhere. It is 
necessary to have a "good and sufficient brake, and also 
suitable bell, horn or other signal," together with lamp. 
Penalty, $25 for first offense. 

New Hampshire. — The ( motorcycle is especially rec- 
ognized in the motor vehicle law of this State. Oper- 
ators' licenses cost $2 per year. "Motorcycles shall be 
required to carry but one number plate, which must be 
constantly displayed in the most conspicuous position 
practicable." Exemptions are granted to non-residents 
temporarily passing through the State. Brakes, muf- 
flers, bells or horns are required, and lighted lamps must 
be displayed from one hour after sunset until one hour 
before sunrise. Eight miles an hour is the speed limit 
within incorporated bounds and 20 miles an hour else- 
where. The penalty for infraction of the law is a fine not 
exceeding $10 for the first offense. 

New Jersey. — Annual license fee, $2. The 1909 law pro- 
provides that "in addition to any mark containing the 
number of registration certificate of any motorcycle to 
be displayed on the front and side thereof, as may be 
found convenient or possible, there shall be painted, or 
otherwise displayed, not less than 2 inches in height, ar- 
ranged perpendicularly on the rear mud-guard of each 
motorcycle, the number of the registration certificate of 
said motorcycle. The said figures on the rear mud-guard 
shall be displayed in such a manner that they shall at all 
times be easily seen and read." Speed limits vary from 
8 to 25 miles an hour. 

New York. — The motorcycle is not recognized in leg- 
islation in the Empire State. Riders of the motor-driven 
two wheeler are subject simply to the rules of the road 
and to local ordinances. The speed limits in the city of 
New York are 8 miles an hour; elsewhere throughout the 
State, 15 miles. 



North Carolina. — No licenses are required The speed 
limits are 8 miles an hour in cities and 25 miles elsewhere. 
Punishment, fine not exceeding $50 or imprisonment not 
exceeding 20 days, or both. 

North Dakota. — Speed limits, 8 miles in towns and 
cities; 25 miles elsewhere. Bell or horn must be used. 
Muffler cut-out prohibited when driving within municipal 
limits or when passing animal-propelled vehicles. Lights 
required. Penalty for violation of the law, fine of not 
less than $10 nor more than $50, or in default of payment, 
imprisonment. 

Ohio. — The following is in the opening paragraph of 
the motor vehicle law: "Motor vehicles shall include all 
vehicles propelled by power other than muscular power, 
except motor bicycles, motorcycles, etc." The authori- 
ties of the city of Cincinnati regard the motorcycle in the 
same class as the bicycle. In the city of Hamilton, how- 
ever, motorcyclists are required to take out a license cost- 
ing $2 per year. 

Oklahoma. — Leo Meyer, Assistant Secretary of State, 
writes that "there is no State law regulating automobiles 
or motorcycles in Oklahoma." 

Pennsylvania. — At present the motorcycle is in the 
same class with the automobile. Next year, however, 
the motorcycle fee will be reduced to $2. Speed limits vary 
in different communities. There are no exemptions. The 
license numbers are enamelled upon a steel plate, which 
is often as large as 6x10 inches. 

Rhode Island. — The motorcycle is placed in practically 
the same class with the automobile, although there are a 
few exceptions. The speed limits are from 15 to 25 miles 
an hour. Licenses are required, the annual fee being 
$1. Visitors may secure a ten-days' exemption. License 
numbers must be at least one inch high, and may be 
painted almost anywhere on the machine. Rhode Island 
riders are a rather careful lot, and they have been instru- 
mental in causing the public to regard their sport with 
favor. 

South Dakota.— Law says that "motor vehicle shall in- 
clude all vehicles propelled by any other than muscular 
power, excepting such motor vehicles as run only upon 
rails or tracks." The annual license fee is $1. License 
numbers must be plainly displayed. The speed limits are 
15 miles an hour within municipal bounds, 20 miles an 
hour elsewhere. Lamps, bell or horn and brakes must 
be used. Penalty for violation of the law, fine not ex- 
ceeding $25 for the first offense. 

Tennessee. — The motorcycle registration fee is $2 
per year. The license tag must be stamped with let- 
ters and numerals not less than 3 inches in height. The 
speed limits are 20 miles an hour. The penalty is a fine 
of not less than $25 or more th^n $100. 

Texas. — The legislators of the Lone Star State have 
not yet recognized the motorcycle. Technically, not even 
the speed limit provisions of the automobile law apply 
to the two-wheeler. 

Utah. — The State motor vehicle law contains the fol- 
lowing provision: "Motor vehicles shall include all vehi- 
cles propelled by any other than muscular power, except- 
ing such motor vehicles as run only upon rail or track; 
provided, that nothing herein contained shall, except as 
otherwise provided, apply to motorcycles, motor bicycles, 
etc." The "reasonable and proper" speed requirement is 
incorporated. 

Wisconsin. — A bill is now pending in the Legislature 
which provides for the inclusion of motorcycles in the 
automobile laws. Up to the present time this matter 
has been controlled by the local authorities. In Milwau- 
kee, for example, the speed has been limited in the same 
manner as with automobiles. Licenses, at a cost of $1 
{Continued on page 24.) 



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SOME EARLY EXPERIENCES AWHEEL 

BY THE NOMAD 



$ 1 



IT was in Paris, during the year 1895, that I first rode in 
a motor "car," owned by a mad Irishman, and fitted 
with tube ignition. Pat organized a "tour," with two other 
car-owners, to a certain racecourse about 14 miles from the 
city. We did that 14 miles in three hours and a half, which 
was good going in those days, and reached the track to 
find that "steam-engines" were barred; so, perforce, we 
left the car in a neighboring stable, Pat expressing the 
hope that "somebody would steal the divil" while we were 
away. To cut the story short, we got back home well after 
midnight, very oily and out of temper, for our homeward 
trip averaged two stops to the mile. 

During the next year I purchased a Benz, which was an 
enlarged easy-chair on wire wheels, with the engine in a 
box at the rear. This was belt-driven with a Bozier two- 
speed gear and clutch — the main trouble being that the 
belt had a trick of coming off at the top of a hill when you 
were running free. When you let in the clutch the engine 
roared like a lion; but there was "nothing doing," and the 
driver simply had to walk back and retrieve the belt, which 
lay like a black snake in the road, generally half a mile 
rearward. It was annoying, to say the least. 

The car certainly used to "get there ," but it generally 
took its own time to accomplish that end, and on hills cyclists 
used to ride past as we thumped our way upwards, casting 
pitying smiles upon us. After this I owned a Leon Bollee 
"quad," and actually toured from Paris to Bordeaux over 
the course, later to become historic in motor racing; in- 
deed, the annual race eventually claimed me as a starter, under 
a French pseudonym, which was adopted principally for the 
convenience of the officials. I did not finish; tire trouble 
claimed me first of all and, later, a car ran into my little 
quad and wrecked it, the owner paying up like a man. I 
left the quad remains to be buried decently in a native junk 
shop, and returned to Paris by train. 

In 1896, I became the proud owner of a De Dion tricycle 
with electric ignition and surface carbureter. This was a 
heavy and noisy mount; but it had a remarkable record for 
reliability, but poor ability as a hill-climber. In fact, the 
doubtful sport of pushing this terror up bad hills led me to 
discard its use, and to eventually sell it to a budding en- 
thusiast, now a figure in the New York automobile world. 
It was in the spring of 1808 that the Werner motor bicycle 
first caught my eye, exhibited, as it was, in High Holborn. 
in London. Occasionally, since that time, has the lure of 
the high-powered automobile attracted me, but I always 
return to my old love, the motorcycle, as since my Wer- 
ner christening I have ever been an enthusiast. 

The Werner motorcyclette, as it was termed, had a dia- 
mond bicycle frame, with a tank having a compartment 
which contained what was called a wick carbureter. The 
engine was placed on a platform over the front forks, which 
were trussed, and drove the front wheel by a round belt; 
later, this was converted to. a V. From the carbureter a 
rubber flexible pipe led into the handle bar, which admitted 
air through a collar operated by one of the grips; the other 
grip worked the switch. A compression tap was fitted, to 
aid in starting. The muffler was carried at the side of the 
engine, which was rated at i l /z h.p. Troubles we had a- 
plenty in those early days, but that gave zest to the sport. 
Lubrication was the chief bugbear, for this was effected by 
a little cup screwed onto the crank chamber, and when one 
' wished to lubricate the engine a dismount was necessary. 
The belt fasteners were merely twisted double hooks, which 
used to pull out fiat or pull through the belt, indeed, do 



anything but fill their vocation. The belt used to stretch 
itself so thin it looked like a long rattail lying in the 
bottom of the pulley grooves, merely slipping and giving 
no drive whatever. 

Later some genius in Lincoln stumbled upon the V-belt, 
and troubles grew less and less. I fitted one to the Wer- 
ner, getting another pulley cast to meet the requirements. 
The general effect was wonderful. We used to race in 
those days De Dion, Werner and Minerva machines, most- 
ly; the others were generally of the "also ran" class. With 
the little Werner one generally got a long start, and suc- 
ceeded in lapping the field very quickly; in fact, the Werner 
held its own in any company, in spite of its microscopic 
horse-power rating. In an evil moment, ambition to get 
even with the handicappers spurred me to attempt a fake 
with my machine so as to obtain even greater efficiency 
from the engine. Thus I bolted an aluminum plate one- 
eighth of an inch in thickness to the top of the piston, with 
a hazy idea of increasing the compression. In addition to- 
this, the flywheels were weighted. The job being com- 
plete, I sallied forth on a testing tour and found a fine in- 
crease of speed had been obtained — so much so that, after half 
an hour's driving, I nearly lost my scalp by the combus- 
tion head blowing clean off and missing me by an inch 
or so. 

The worst machine I ever owned was one of obscure 
Belgian manufacture. This motorcycle was fitted with an 
outside flywheel which had a fondness for suddenly leaving 
the machine and bowling down the road on its own hook. 
This was not the only pleasantry in which this motor- 
cycle indulged, for it had an infinite variety of tricks, which 
it would play at random. At last, after superhuman efforts, 
I tuned it up to run for a mile or so, and then I sold it to 
an inoffensive stranger who disappeared in the evening 
haze. I never saw him again, though I had imagined him 
calling round with a hatchet. But the machine must have 
killed him before he had time to purchase a weapon. 

After sampling two or three reliable makes, I picked up 
a 10 hp. pacing monster, buying it from some stranded 
French professional racing men. No brakes or mud guards 
were fitted, and the gear was 2 l / 2 to 1. After trying to drive 
the brute at less than forty miles an hour, I gave it up as 
hopeless, and sold the machine to a budding speed enthu- 
siast. The bud burst into bloom quickly, for in endeavor- 
ing to negotiate a busy thoroughfare, he tried to push a 
street car out of the way, and was forced to sell the re- 
mains for a mere song. Of machines built prior to 1902 
the best I ever struck was the British built "Bat," with the 
2^i hp. De Dion engine. Here was power as well as relia- 
bility; in fact, those old 2^ 76x76 engines could make many 
a present-day 354 hp. look very silly. Our old American 
friend, the Mitchell, came in for my early confidence, per- 
haps on account of its being a home product This was a 
great machine for grass-track racing, but on the road it 
rather kicked at hills on account of its high gear, while 
the tank-clips and fittings objected strongly to any jog- 
gling, and parted company from the machine at times. I 
remember that the first reliability trial ever held saw that 
machine get through by swindling the judges into giving a 
perfect score. Somewhere I have an illuminated certifi- 
cate testifying to this wonderful ride, not mentioning any- 
thing about the subtlety of the rider, who lied right lustily 
to procure that valuable trophy. 

Among the very early models which served me as experi- 
ments were products of firms which have rise* to eminence 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



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since those days. The one original machine which I well 
remember driving was the first machine turned out by the 
Wolseley people, who have since that time steadily risen 
to eminence in the British industry. This machine was 
more than original, according to our present-day notions. 
It was manufactured in 1897, but I did not try one until 
late in 1898. The construction was more that of a tri-car 
than anything else, the front seat being the driving seat, 
and the driver and passenger sitting back to back, the rear 
seat being carried over the back wheel. The engine was 
a horizontal, opposed two cylinder, air cooled, fitted with 
mechanical valves, these valves being mounted in the base 
chamber with pipes leading from there to the cylinder. 
The drive was by spur intermediate gearing, and the driv- 
ing wheel actually had a live axle. On the other side of 
this axle, a funny arrangement of a chain running to the 
gearbox forward was employed, the change being made 
by a "gate" lever and a leather belt, which allowed a slip- 
ping action when changing gears, taking the place of the 
clutch. This machine was fairly efficient and reliable. 

Another motorcycle which I rode on several occasions 
was the Holden, with four cylinders, and driven by eccen- 
tric shaft to a small rear wheel. This was marketed in 
1895, but I rode a later model. The pedals on this motor- 
cycle were fitted on the front wheel, as in the old high 
bicycle, but apart from that, the construction was far in 
advance of the time. 

In order of reliability, the De Dion tricycle was certainly 
the best of the very early models; but, coming away from 
three-wheelers, I will proceed with some further reminis- 
cences of motorcycles. There were, for example, the won- 
derful little iH hp. belt-driven F. N.'s of the earliest pat- 
terns. They were lightweights driven by flat belt onto a 
wooden belt-rim. The engine was well cradled, and the 
whole design up to modern ideas. Wonderful was the 
power of those little machines. About the time I was past 
experimenting with the first motorcycles in 1901, a friend 
and myself constructed a belt-driven tri-car somewhat on 
the lines of the British Phoenix. We built this in Paris, 
using a 4 hp. "copper Aster," this well-known engine hav- 
ing copper radiating flanges. No two-speed gear was used, 
as we geared at 6 to 1, and toured in France and England 
with this machine, which attracted attention everywhere, 
perhaps because we had the courage to paint it yellow. 
We took the Yellow Aster for one memorable tour over 
the beautiful roads of Devonshire and Cornwall in Eng- 
land. In this locality we were actually charged seventy- 
four cents for a gallon of gasoline. Yet, in spite of the ma- 
chine being home-made in those happy days, we managed 
several non-stop hundred-mile runs. With a passion for 
home-made motor-bicycles we rebuilt the Mitchell into .1 
British engined vertical type motorcycle, but the engine 
pulled the heart out of the frame and let me down gently 
in the road one summer day. 

I think it must have been in 1900-1901 that several British 
cycle firms started out on the thorny path of motorcycle 



construction. I tried all, and do not wonder that many 
firms abandoned the manufacture of motorcycles after a 
few experiments. The Raleigh front-driven was a copy 
of the Werner brought up to date and finished like a watch. 
The Enfield was an extraordinary conception, the engine 
being cradled up like the Werner, driving by crossed 
belt to the gear wheel; this machine was a beauty for 
sideslip. 

In the Humber, chain drive with friction clutch, and the 
(British) Excelsior of 1899, we struck more reliability and 
good workmanship. These two firms have returned to the 
fray, and a fine machine they make, to judge from specifi- 
cations. In France, Werner's still held sway, but the 
Peugeot, Minerva and others of like historic name, were 
rising to a high position. The French have never seemed 
to take the motorcycle seriously. In old days, save for a 
few makes of good design, the usual procedure seemed to 
be to clamp an engine and tank onto a bicycle frame, and 
"voila tout!" In spite of this tendency, some of the earlier 
Peugeot and Werner models were examples of fine work, 
while the Minerva was always a well constructed and de- 
signed example. The earlier four-cylinder models were 
generally marvels of engineering design. I have already 
mentioned the Holden, which enjoyed popularity in its 
day. Later, there appeared one called the Binks. which 
startled the British sportsman by being before its time, so 
to speak. This machine was heralded with trumpets, and, 
when it did appear, it was likely to impress one with its 
small wheels, massive machinery, friction-clutch, shaft 
drive and upholstered seat. I saw the lonely, deserted in- 
ventor one show time on the grounds of the Crystal Pal- 
ace. I tried the machine. Although cumbersome, the 
monster was very flexible, but I fear that its clever and 
unique design killed its chances. Meanwhile, as the nomad 
wandered and bore a charmed existence among the many 
wierd inventions abroad, here we had Pennington startling 
the new world. Not only that, but a few hundred yards 
from my home lies the battered hulk of a Leon Bollee tri- 
car, imported in 1908 by W. W. Stall, of Boston, and sold 
to C. H. Metz, one of our present-day mentors and a patri- 
arch of the sport, although his years do not really warrant 
such a description. Mr. Metz also owned a Werner, front 
drive, of which I have spoken, and later a iH hp. De Dion, 
both of which may be added to our records. I must not 
forget also that John Wanamaker, of Philadelphia, im- 
ported De Dion tricycles, the vibrating pulsations of which 
doubtless had something to do with the name of the 
Quaker City — quien sabe? as they say in Motorcycle 
Row in Los Angeles! If I remember rightly, methinks 
it was Dutch Waller who brought the De Dion bicycle to 
this country, and a well-known exponent in those days 
here was Dr. Purcell, who now lolls in the luxury of an 
automobile. 

Finally, though my years be few, and my locks like unto 
the raven, yet it seems that I have lived through all the 
ages to think of this array of motor ghosts. 



HP HE following, which appeared in the Trinidad, Col., 
* Chronicle-News, is worth reprinting: "Tired, in the 
fullest sense of the word, of grinding coffee by hand since 
the fire at the Southern Colorado Power Plant, Manager 
Kent, of the Dern-Kent Coffee Company, has rigged up 
his motorcycle in a way that is unique, but effective. By 
the means of a few wooden bucket lids and a piece of 
cotton rope he has connected the rear wheel with a big 
mill. With the power turned on, the coffee is ground in 
a jiffy. There is one trouble, however: the engine gets 
hot, and operations are suspended frequently to allow 
the apparatus to cool." 

The machine is an Excelsior, and the fact that it should 
operate so well, under such conditions, is a fine testimonial 
to its remarkable efficiency. 



)p| ORAIN, O.— Dr. A. M. Webster has left this city for 
*-■ a long-planned motorcycle trip to Europe. At Buffalo 
he was joined by William Chadeayne of the Auto-Bi Company. 
England will be thoroughly scoured, ample time being 
taken to see all the sights along the route chosen, which 
is laid out in the most beautiful and famous parts of the 
country. The Scottish hills will be scaled, and after a 
tour through Scotland the land of the shamrock will be 
visited and much time spent there. After Ireland has been 
covered the two will sail for Hamburg. After a short 
visit there the trip will be continued by machine to Ber- 
lin, Leipsic, Cologne, down the Rhine, through Holland 
and Belgium, to Paris. From Paris the party will leave 
for Heidelberg and will tour along the Rhine to Switz- 
erland. The trip over the Alps will not be attempted, the 
two taking train through the tunnels from Switzerland. 



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-MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Jlxy 1, 1909. 



EASTERN DISTRICTS SUMMER SESSION 



THE sununer meeting of the Eastern District. Federation of 
American Motorcyclists, was not held in Boston on Satur- 
day, June j6^ as originally intended, but at Lake Peace, Wrent- 
hara, Mass., Sunday, June 27, from 2 to 4 p. nx. Notices of 
the meeting had been mailed by Secretary Swenson to all 
Eastern District members whose names and addresses were 
on tile with him. However, the Eastern District secre- 
tary has not received from the national secretary the names 
of members, who have joined the last few months, a con- 
sider abte number, who, of course, received no notices. When 
Vice-President E. L. ButHngton, Secretary B. A_ Swenson, 
Treasurer F. W. Horenburger, together with Charles H. 
Westcott, oi Providence, arrived in Boston at the meeting 
hall at about $ o'clock they found only 9 members present, 
two from New York, three from Providence, and four from 
Boston, and as the rules and regulations called for a quorum 
of nineteen^ nothing could be done. Secretary Swenson sug- 
gested an adjournment to next day at Lake Peace and he 
and Mr. Mann promised to get a quorum. With the exception 
of Mr. Horenburger, who had to return to New York; all 
promised to attend the Lake Peace meeting. When the 
meeting opened the following were present : 

E. L. Buirington, Providence; B. A. Swenson, Providence; 
Charles H. Westcott, Providence; Frank O. Johnson, Prov- 
idence ; Albert Lawson, Providence ; Frank Wilkinson, Prov- 
idence ; W. F. Mann, Boston ; Mr. Griding, Boston ; J. J. 
Fecitt. Boston ; R. L. Elliott, Boston ; Theodore Rothe, Bos- 
ton: David Watt. Boston ; G. Ellsworth, Boston: F. Beauvais. 
Taunton; A. Beauvais. Taunton; M. C. Cumla, Taunton; 
James Bennett, Taunton : .A L. Male, Taunton, J. J. O' Conner,. 
New York. 

Secretary B. A. Swenson reported that copies of the rules 
asd regulations had been printed. It was impossible, he re- 
ported, to announce the gain in membership in the Eastern 
District since the last meeting, owing to the dilatoriness of 
the national secretary. Treasurer F. N. Horenburgers report 
was read by the secretary. It showed a cash balance on 
hand of $39-2.72. The sum of $305.28 had been expended by 



the Eastern District since the organization meeting in Decem- 
ber last. Both reports were accepted. 

State Commissioner EL M. Easterbrook, of Maine, reported 

that whrie the F. A. M. membership there was continually in- 
creasing, he found it hard to get the membership fee except 
from subscribers to the motorcycle publications. These he 
found to be ready recruits for membership. C C Wilbur, of 
Keene. N. H^. reported that while the New Hampshire mem- 
bership was only rr last year, the Consolidated Motorcyclists 
of Keene had a short time ago sent in 35 applications. Mr. 
Mann commented favorably upon the activity of Mr. Wilbar 
and his fellow workers. Mr. Mann, who is State Commis- 
sioner of Massachusetts, reported an increase of 186 members 
in that State. 

E. L. Buifington was then nominated for vice-president by 
Mr. Mann. Mr. Buifington^ however, declined, his view being 
that Providence had held the office long enough. J. J. 
CTConner. of New York, then nominated C C Wilbur, of 
Keene, N. FL Mr. Wilburs name will be presented to the 
Indianapolis convention. Vice-President Bumngton had re- 
ceived from the national president the application of W. T. 
Marsh for membership, and it was voted to recommend his 
application at the national meeting. 

On motion oi Mr. Mann, it was voted that it be the sense of 
the meeting that the bill of Mr. Hurtubis be paid, there being 
a balance due him for legal services. 

It was resolved, that the fall meeting be held, in connection 
with a race meet, and Mr. Swenson was instructed to prepare 
an estimate of the expense, etc. 

Mr. Swenson suggested holding a field day at a place like 
Lake Peace, if the different clubs in this section would help 
to guarantee a fund in case of a rainy day. This suggestion 
was favorably received. 

After adjournment. Mr. Swenson invited *T-ong John" r 
O'Connor to return on bis machine to Providence. The 
two men, both over six feet tall, straddled the same sadoUe 
and succeeded in making the 20 miles in 45 minutes, excellent 
time, in view of the conditions. 



THIS isn't motorcycling, but inasmuch as it pertains to 
a gentleman -o well known in die trade, it is worth 
reprinting. The article appeared originally in tile New York 
Sun: 

The latent machine to fly is that which Glenn H. 
Curtiss, of Hammondsport, N. Y., has built to the order 
of tile Aeronautic Society and which was the principal 
feature at the society's tirst exhibition this year on June 
26. How marked is the progress Mr. Curtiss has made 
may be >een from one comparison. 

His iir>t machine, the June Bug, had a forty-six toot 
spread. The new machine has but a twenty-eight foot 
eleven inch spread. The greatest speed of the June Bug 
was not more than about 22 miles an hour. The new 
machine jumps into the air 45 miles an hour within a 
hundred yards and has had to be altered for the purpose 
of -lowing it down. A glance at the two machines will be 
even more striking. The June Bug was a clumsy vehicle. 

As tirst built the new machine, though perfectly under 
control laterally, was so lively longitudinally that Mr. 
Curtiss, despite his mania for speed, was a little scared. 
Its controls then were two single planes outrigged ro 
feet in front and behind and working in unison. The 
slightest touch shot the machine up into the air to a 
height of fifty feet at lightning speed and the next touch 
brought it down again with a -.mash. 

Even after the present double rudder was put on in 
front the machine was still too quick and Mr. Curtiss de- 
termined to fix the rear rudder stationary. Since then he 
has taken a further step for Mowing down; he has set 
thz rear rudder at a -slight angle ^o that it acts as a brake. 



SPOKANE. Wash.— An Indian, driven by Allen Kent, re- 
cently captured the .32-mile road race from the Trent 
road powder house to Moab and return, from an Excel- 
sior driven by a mechanic of the A. D. McDonald Supply- 
Company. The time for the race was 40:41. 







MRS. F. S. MOOKfi. A C1-£V!-:R KIDKR. 

Member ot the ."km them Motor Club. Who Rides- a Six Horsepower 

N. >. l\ Twin. 



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SPRINGFIELD TRACK TO 
BE THE FINEST OF ALL 



Circular Speedway, Three Laps to 
a Mile, Will Be Ready Between 
Middle of July and First of August. 




Part of Springfield Board Track, As It Appeared a Few Days Ago. 



NO locality in the United States has been more closely and 
prominently identified with wheeling than Springfield, 
Mass., for between racing and manufacturing it has had a 
continuous connection with the sport for at least 30 years. 
It was here that Geo. M. Hendee, for many years the amateur 
champion of the high wheel, won his world's championship 
and set up world's records for the old-time bicycle. 
Eight or ten years later, when the low "safety" had sup- 
planted the graceful high wheel, racing was again revived at 
Springfield, and the Hampden Park records aroused the in- 
terest of lovers of sport throughout the country, for the best 
men of their day competed, and the records set up by Willie 
Windle and Rowe were such as electrified the count ry. It 
was at the Hampden Park track that the flying South 
African, Mendjes, made his 24 hour record. 

Later on. Jack Prince, who came over from England with 
other high wheel experts, built the wood surface bicycle track, 
the Springfield Colliseum, where popular racing was con- 
ducted for a number of years, and it was at this track that 
the successful operation of the motor pacing machines sug- 
gested to Mr. Hendee the idea of building motorcycles for 
popular use. 

With the dying out of the bicycle boom, track racing in 
Springfield ceased for a time. But with the general recogni- 
tion of the motorcycle and its growing popularity. Springfield 
promises to again come to the front as a sporting center, for 
Jack Prince, encouraged by experiments in track building for 
motorcycles at Paterson and Los Ange':es. has undertaken 
the erection of a track at Springfield that will surpass an> - 
thing of its kind ever attempted. 

In undertaking the construction of the new track at Spring- 
field, tbe especially favorable conditions have enabled the 
designer to carry out plans which he has never before had the 
opportunity to try. and which he is confident will produce the 
fastest track in the world. Heretofore, restrictions in spao*. 
have necessitated the building of elliptical track?, and it ha~ 
been always more or less <~i an experiment to d^-ign iw 



proper curves and banking on the turns. Moreover, the<c 
tracks have been limited in size. In the present case, a map™ 
ficent piece of level ground was available, and upon it M t . 
Prince is erecting a track in the form of a true circle. crm 
feet in diameter, on the inside, and measuring a full third 0! 
a mile in circumference. The banking throughout is 40 
degrees. Expert riders who have inspected the work nn v in 
progress, have pronounced the track to be the fine*;: ever de- 
signed, and they say that it will be safe at any ^need 

The track is located about three mile- from tlv hn*inrs« 
center of Springfield, close to a trolley line, and wd h< nn- 
vided with ample facilities to afford seimr.-t:- iii-r^inc 
rooms for the riders and commodious seatinr arrnmrm.ti:mon* 
for the spectators, with a perfect view or ovr- n rno; n: 
the track. Besides motorrye W- racing th» immen- amnn- 
theater will afford a splendid plac* un h;i • t..." . •- inr- d;i] 
games or any other athh-tir sport lie tr:i< ; < expert*.-' t- 
be finished in time for a Ijij.- oi»Miinr op In t~: 



THAT LITTLE F. A M. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


"M'/T« k( \t.lA III' MKATM 




' " #/j Jiro;ui\v;: 


.\ 1 \ < ■ , 


"G#-ftI«-ni»*!i . 




"Jv.h? ^ii'iiii*-! in.' i< , I- • V M 


1* ii'". V • • • :..-..- 


ar»- MllJ M«-.idi' p'MjTfTtr 11 


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\ »-rtl-»-tii»-fi' \ < i'.f • .itii« hi ii. 


, , , . . , . 


flirtnh*-! - ;ii ti" !.■•■ ' .inn" " m« 


H!"; ..• .- - 


will i.M ov»-« .'...yr> i' 11.1 if 


...... , 


ItM-tl l.«-T *••]]' V". ' 1'.' ' II'" !!•• 


.. . • 


*I.l 1 1 ' : 1 i ' • ' V- < - ■ • 


.,• 


!!»-♦-! * i! ;' «i ,- .s<.-. »-t • i-.-m.. 




".»■»• i ••• _,.,.,- 





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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909. 



Tips and Topics — By A Veteran 



SOME time ago it happened that the writer possessed a 
"stable" of motorcycles, a four cylinder, a twin, a 3^ 
h. p. single cylinder, and a "lightweight" 2% h. p. All 
these machines were kept in constant use, and I can dis- 
tinctly remember how the choice of a mount was made 
for any particular ride. This was after practical experi- 
ment and distinctly showed the advantage of possessing 
just the machine to meet the purpose. The light-weight 
came in for all town riding and traffic dodging, in fact, 
its more ponderous brethren could not touch it in general 
case of handling in crowded thoroughfares. For muddy, 
wet weather the shaft-driven "four" was requisitioned, and 
it seemed just to meet the requirements of a good mud- 
plug. The twin-cylinder was the least worked of the four, 
being used only for fast runs or where mountains were to 
be negotiated. This machine, I admit, was not quite mod- 
ern enough to be everything in reliability, as it possessed 
a troublesome form of make and break ignition, which re- 
quired very delicate adjustment. 

The single-cylinder was the favorite, being a powerful 
3V2 h.p., with magneto ignition; its general efficiency was 
wonderful. For all tours and prolonged rides the single 
cylinder was the mount chosen, and yet, taking each ma- 
chine from a cubical capacity basis, the efficiency shown 
was right out of proportion to any mathematical formula. 
One cannot make accurate comparisons on this point, any- 
way, as too many other considerations step in besides 
mere relation of cubical capacity to power. From a prac- 
tical point* of view, the question resolves itself into the 
statement that the single cylinder should show greater 
efficiency. Mind you, this is a question of mere efficiency, 
nothing more, and the reason for such a deduction is 
merely a mechanical one. 

Every moving part absorbs power, and the fewer the 
number of moving parts there are the less will be the con- 
sumption of power in friction, so that, all other things 
being equal, it may be taken, not only as a matter of 
opinion, but as a matter of incontrovertible fact, that, 
working on this basis, the two-cylinder engine will be 
more efficient than the four-cylinder; and, carrying the ar- 
gument still further, that the single cylinder engine will 
be more efficient than either of them. As stated before, 
this is a mere question of efficiency, not flexibility and so 
forth, as the multi-cylinder machines score easily on that 
point, as a general rule. 

Water in Gasoline. — I have spoken once before of the 
unaccountable "finds" that one strikes when draining a 
gasoline can to its deepest dregs, so to speak. By the 
adroit use of two strainers or more we can catch these 
protoplasms and arrest their growth into motor cops, but 
we cannot stop water getting into the tank; that's the 
real trouble. Oh, yes! the gauze is supposed to stop the 
water getting in, but after one has used the funnel strainer 
or strainers once or twice the water trickles through 
merrily enough. It is reasonable to think that, after 
the gasoline has been filtered once or twice between the 
gasoline can and the carbureter, it should arrive in the 
float-chamber free from extraneous matter and moisture? 
I thought so once, but I have now convictions that it is 
not so. Three or four times of late, when cleaning my 
carbureter in the course of a general tune-up, I have been 
surprised to find some rusty-colored water therein, snugly 
concealed in the float-chamber and in the passages to and 
from the jet. The tank has a large gauze filter just inside 
the screw-cap, and there is another gauze at the outlet 
pipe; again, I always use a strainer-funnel when filling 
up my tank with gasoline, so that it is obvious that the 
straining process takes place three times before the gaso- 
line reaches the carbureter. Since finding this out I have 
been making experiments with the straining funnels which 



I possess and also with others, and I find that water will 
run readily through the gauze, though I have always no- 
ticed that any water in a gasoline can stays at the bottom 
of the can until it is nearly empty, and then comes out 
in a rusty, globular form. I have a friend who is a case- 
hardened theorist on these matters and he insists that 
the presence of water in a carbureter may not always be 
attributed to that which gets in with the gasoline. His 
peculiar theory is that the aqueous vapor in the air which 
displaces the gasoline • from the tank may condense in 
sufficient quantity to form* the bulk of it. Quite so! But 
although it may sound good when said slowly, I think I 
would rather have a good swear and clean out the con- 
densed caboodle. 

& & 

Spring Footrests. — An ingenious young friend of mine 
has built a motorcycle himself. Considering that he is but 
sixteen years old, the result, although lacking finish, is 
first-class. In his construction he has mainly used "bits of 
things," the greater number of the "bits," including the 
engine and carbureter, having once been an Orient buck- 
board. The riding position on this home-made "crock" is 
extremely comfortable; long handlebars (innocent of plat- 
ing) are fitted; no pedalling gear, but substantial footrests. 
The engine, as the reader will probably remember, is heavy 
and extremely substantial, and this is fitted in a very low 
loop frame, which has very little road clearance. Of 
course, the center of gravity being low, the machine is 
remarkably free from any tendency toward sideslip, but 
on a prolonged trial ride, during which the machine be- 
haved perfectly, it was noticed how these footrests be- 
came uncomfortable and irksome. Their position was 
altered, but although this improved matters to a great 
degree, the same effect was felt after a long ride over in- 
different roads. Another idea was tried, that of wrap- 
ping the footrests in thick sheet rubber; this was fairly 
effective. 

Some time ago I explained how to construct footboards 
so that a continuous change of position might be ob- 
tained when out on a long ride. These form a most com- 
fortable fitting, but simple spring foot-rests may be easily 
made by any local garage man or blacksmith. These sim- 
ply consist of one inverted L footrest on either side, with 
the arms projecting upward for about 6 inches, these arms 
and the whole foot-rest being made of strong %" fiat 
stock. At the top of either side extension, about one 
inch down, two holes are bored, and on both sides nearest 
the engine an additional extension of the same height is 
either brazed or the stack can be simply bent upward, 
forming a double rectangle, this making a footrest with 
extensions both on the inside and outside. Drill the holes 
side by side on either of these two uprights, fit four strong 
springs to each, and make a smaller cross-piece of wider 
stock, say 2 inches, so that the foot has a platform to 
rest upon. Drill , holes to receive the springs and the 
thing is done. 

Another way to accomplish this is to make both foot- 
rests in one piece and mount them in a central guiding 
frame, suspending them with springs and arranging the 
frame so that the foot-rests will not dip sideways at any 
time. Again, I have seen foot-rests made of plain, flat, 
springy steel covered with rubber, but these break easily 
in case of a fall. 

J* & 

A Magneto Tip. — When one has sifted the source of 
trouble down to the magneto (I emphasize the "when/' 
as the magneto is usually the last place to look), start 
your testing operations by detaching the wire from the 
switch, if one is fitted. A magneto switch works by short- 
circuiting the current, and sometimes this switch sets up 
a permanent short. , 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



15 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Vol. IV. 



JULY i, 1909 



No. 13 



Published 

Twice a Month, 1st and 15th 

By the 

Motorcycle Publishing Company 



F. P. PRIAL Pres. and Treas. 



THOS. HILL LOW, Sec 



Offices, 299 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Telephone, Worth 3691 



Home Subscriptions, $1.00 Foreiga Subscriptions, $2.00 
Single Copies, 10 cts. 

Entered as second class matter July 6th, 1908. at the Post Office 
at New York, N. Y '., under act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

General Editorial and Business Direction 
F. P. Prial 



J. Leo Sauer 
L. H. Cornish 



Editor 
Advertising 



F. 


A. 


M. 


MEET 


NUMBER 


AUGUST 


FIRST 


A FINE, 


BIG ISSUE 



LESSONS OF THE HILL CLIMB. 

THE hill climb conducted under the auspices of the 
New York Motorcycle Club was partly a success, 
though in some respects it approached perilously near a 
failure. Some wonderful riding was done, and hill climb- 
ing records were literally annihilated. The hill chosen 
for the seven events which made up the program was 
ideally adapted to the purpose, and the meteorological 
conditions were perfect. The crowd was not remarkably 
large, but the sport was good. 

The climb, however, teaches a number of lessons, which 
will no doubt be profited by. Such competitions should 
be conducted by a committee, not by individuals. Pro- 
motors should refrain from competing. No such distinc- 
tions as those attempted should be tried again until fur- 
ther progress is made toward solving, if a solution be pos- 
sible, of the old, old stock-racing machine controversy. 
It was the precipitation of this antiquated bugbear into 
the arena of discussion that caused a delay of nearly two 
hours before the first event was started. 

The situation has come to such a pass as to make ap- 
pear ridiculous present-day efforts to distinguish between 
stock and racing machines. Technically, it is an easy 
matter; in practice, just the contrary. It seems as though 
the future will produce only two classes of competitions, 
strictly racing events and reliability trials, in which speed 
is no factor. If the F. A. M. were to recognize this dis- 
tinction only, the stock-racing puzzle would be solved 
once and for all time. There may be other methods of 
solving the problem, but none which is simpler or likely to 



prove more effective. Again, with the private owner, 
trade rider and professional classification effective, this 
plan of classification will not prove difficult. 

An English correspondent sums up the entire situation in 
the following paragraph : "Evasion or contravention of the 
rules at hill-climbs respecting "standardization" becomes un- 
important by reason of the many loopholes the word lends 
to the anxious and daring ones. This being so, if a com- 
petitor by subterfuge can add to his record, he will do so in 
spite of vague regulations and mere printed rules." But the 
hill climb is the only class of competition in which stock 
and racing machines come into everlasting conflict, provided 
the above suggested plan of doing away with the stock and 
racing machine distinction without a practical difference, to- 
gether with the proposed trade rider-private owner classifi- 
cation, are adopted. 

& & 

A SIGNIFICANT CONVERSION. 

THE latest convert is no less a personage than our friend, 
A. D. Adee, President of the N. C. A. Mr. Adee has 
stood out against driving by motor for many years, though, it 
seems, in spite of a growing conviction that motorcycling is 
"the only way." It was like trying to sweep the ocean back 
with a broom to overcome the temptation to use a motor 
machine. Adee finally succumbed and, from all accounts, he 
is happy. It is a notable conversion. Still, that is the story 
everywhere, the inevitable result of what was originally deep 
set and apparently insurmountable interest in wheeling by 
muscular power. The transition, now an every-day 
occurrence, is simply one of the encouraging sign 3 of the 
times. 

SPARK POINTS. 

One of the gamest little riders in the country is Kellogg. 
His accident will prove to have been only a temporary 
set-back, for Stanley has the right stuff in him. Keeping 
him down is simply outside the realm of the possible. 

JC ** 

"Cut out slang," said the teacher. We are not interested 
in your slang, but don't cut out your muffler where the 
noise of your exhaust might be regarded as a nuisance. 
Just try to be decent. 

Stock or racing — that is the question, the subject of 
many a Hamletesque soliloquy, and the topic of many 
more heart-burning arguments. 

Go to Indianapolis awheel, if possible. But travel 
thither anyway, even though you have to use your pedal 
extremities. 

Dishonored amateurism is worse than none at all. What 
is the sense of butting one's head against a stone wall any 
longer ? 

Up i»050 feet of a serpentine road, having a grade of 17 
per cent., in 21 4-5 seconds'.. Walter, you're a marvel. 
Jl & 

Still they come, and still they go— records at Los 
Angeles. Just two dozen of them a week ago Sunday. 

A thorn in the side of the sport is the auxiliary port 
hole. By whom and how, if ever, will it be plucked out? 

They are "honorable men, all honorable men," these 
amateurs. 

Indianapolis! The time? August 9 to 13 inclusive. Be 
there. 

By the way, that Voelker boy is a "comer." 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909. 



THE TIMING OF MOTORCYCLE RACES 

By £. L. OVINGTON, President Federation of American Motorcyclists 



AS an engineer, I have often been struck with the com- 
paratively crude method used in timing the average 
motorcycle races. I do not mean to say that, under the 
present system, it is impossible to obtain accuracy, but I 
do most positively state that other and more scientific 
methods of timing should be used, especially in the case 
of prominent race meets, where records are liable to be 
broken. 

In the physical laboratory, when an observer wishes to 
measure accurately the elapsed time between two certain 
events, he uses what is known as a recording chronometer. 
Roughly described, this is nothing more or less than a 
cylinder which is revolved uniformly by clock work. Two 
recording pens, situated side by side, are arranged so that 
they draw two parallel lines on this cylinder as it is re- 
volved. By means of a screw, the cylinder is moved 
longitudinally during its revolution, so that the pens trace 
two spirals from one end of the cylinder to the other. 
Connected to these pens are two small electro-magnets, 
and by sending a current of electricity through the wind- 
ings of these magnets, the pens are moved in a direction 
along the axis of the cylinder, a slight distance. If we 
start the cylinder rotating, therefore, and pass a cur- 
rent through the magnet, there will be a small indentation 
made, if the electricity is momentarily allowed to flow 
through the electrical windings. An accurately adjusted 
chronometer, which is far more accurate than a stop 
watch, is arranged to break the electrical circuit in one of 
the electro-magnets periodically, say, every second, or 
even every fifth of a second. Arrangement is then made 
to break the electrical circuit in the other electro-magnet, 
so that when a machine crosses the starting line a slight 
indentation will be put in the spiral of the pens not in 
circuit with the chronometer. As the machine crosses the 
finish line, another indentation will be made in this spiral. 



In operation, it will be noticed, that one of the spirals 
on the drum will be periodically indented, while the other 
spiral will be indented once when the motorcycle crosses 
the starting line, and once when it finishes. A counter 
is attached to the electro-magnet actuated by the 
chronometer so as to count the number of indentations 
made in this circuit. An exact autographic record, there- 
fore, is made of the elapsed time. 

Now, I will acknowledge that in the case of a small 
motorcycle race meet held in a country town, the pro- 
moters could not go to the trouble — or expense of ob- 
taining a more or less expensive timing system of this 
kind. There is no reason, however, why an autographic 
timing system of this kind should not be installed in all 
of our large race tracks. 

I bring this before the public at this time on account of 
the fact that a movement is being started here in America 
to build race tracks in different parts of the country, hav- 
ing motorcycle racing particularly in view. There is no 
reason in the world why the promoters should not make 
arrangements to have a small timing stand erected at 
these race tracks and the proper instrument installed. 

To the layman my explanation of this system may 
appear rather complicated, but if a physicist or an engineer 
be consulted, he will tell you that this method is used 
in even the smallest laboratories. Standard apparatus 
may be purchased from almost any dealer in physical 
supplies, and, once installed, this apparatus is not liable 
to get out of order, and is very easy to operate. 

Furthermore, and by far the most important point, is 
that we have an autographic record of each motorcycle 
race. In the case of a world's record being broken, or a 
championship established, we have here a record which is 
absolutely beyond dispute. Again, the personal equation 
is entirelv absent. 



JUBILANT over the success of its first race meet, the 
Philadelphia Motorcycle Trade Association is plan- 
ning an active season. A special invitation event in the 
form of an unlimited pursuit race will constitute the big 
feature of the next Point Breeze meet. According to the 
tentative program outlined at a recent meeting of the 
members of the association, its second meet will prob- 
ably be held between the 15th of July and 1st of 
August. It appears that the first effort of this organiza- 
tion took the people of Quaker City completely by storm. 
The Philadelphia dealers are very much encouraged, and 
they are now determined to make the most of the oppor- 
tunity before them. 

AT Toledo, O., T. B. Riley, who, riding an Excelsior, 
intends to encircle the globe, made the fol- 
lowing statement: "I expect to get to New York in good 
time, sailing from there to Queenstown, then taking in 
Dublin, Liverpool, London, France, back to London. 
Then I sail to Capetown, visit African cities, take in 
Australia, Hong Kong, Yokohama, sailing back to Frisco 
and cycling back to Spokane." Riley started from Spo- 
kane May 9, and, true to his word, he reached New York City 
just a few hours before this issue went to press. Riley was in 
excellent physical condition. He will leave New York for 
Europe the latter part of this week. 



1 NOTICED while reading your interesting issue of 
June 15 that you gave me no mention in the twenty- 
five mile race held at Point Breeze track on June 12 last. 
In this race I was declared second, having, however, to 
ride 26 miles instead of 25 miles; and in stopping at the 
twenty-fifth mile, the Bradley passed me. I was requested 
to ride a mile further, which I did, but which was not nec- 
essary, for I had already ridden 25 miles and gained second 
place. I now hold the prize for this position, as the judges 
admitted that the scoring was incorrect. Yours truly, 

j* A Fred Voelker. 

SAN DIEGO, Cal.— C A. Sheppard, who was so se- 
verely injured while going out to meet Jimmy Urqu- 
hart, one of his riders, has left the Hearne Hospital. 
Sheppard's escape from death is regarded as nothing less 
than miraculous. 

& & 

CLEVELAND.— A. W. Strople, on an Indian, defeated 
all of the four-wheelers, except one freak car, in the 
hill climb recently conducted near here by the Cleveland 
Automobile Club. 

SAN FRANCISCO.— W. H. Sieman and E. Eikelberger, of 
the local club, are making up a party which will in the 
near future journey to Seattle to visit the Alaska Yukon 
Exposition. 



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17 




A LIVE ORGANIZATION— THE CONSOLIDATED MOTORCYCLISTS, OF KEENE, N. H. 



THE Concourse Club, of New York, held its second an- 
nual spring run to Savin Rock, Conn., June 13th. 
The affair was most enjoyable in every detail — good roads, 
a good dinner and few troubles. Those who participated 
were: L. H. Guttermann, W. L. Coursen, L. Restrepo, 
J. C. Foley, W. A. McClellance, E. Rosin, J. J. McNalley, 
J. P. Brown, B. Lott, N. Fieldstein. E. C. Lesser. W. 
Downes, F. Larsen, J. Hirchel, J. Ullman, H. B. Eber- 
wein, J. Raynis, J. A. Dobbins, F. G. Guntner, B. Larsen, 
L. P. McCabe, L. Ullman, M. C. Rose, A. Rupp, Wm. 
Knapp, G. Wood, A. S. Baty, E. A. Paprold, C. E. Fow- 
ler, A. M. Smith, C. Frobisher, M. Kirkbold, Gibbons, 
K. F. Moore, M. P. Sullivan, C. P. Rodgers, H. B. 
Lyons, S. Busch, J. A. McAuley, D. Willis, A. Knic- 
bockker, H. B. Kellogg, G. N. Hookey, N. C. Wing, 
S. Slone, S. D. Rosen, J. R. Rehemann, A. Schmitt, 
E. Britenbach and F. Schmitt. 

The following finished on schedule time: W. A. McClel- 
lance (Indian), M. P. Sullivan (Indian), F. Larsen (Thor), 
C. P. Rodgers (Excelsior), H. B. Kellogg (Excelsior), 
K. F. Moore (Excelsior), J. Raynis (Thor), H. B. Lyons 
(N. S. U.), G. M. Hookey (Indian), F. G. Guntner 
(Indian), V. H. Downes (Indian), J. A. McAuley (R.-S.), 
N. C. Wing (Indian). Winner of prizes for the best 
scores: F. Larsen, W. A. McClellance, C. P. Rodgers, 
M. P. Sullivan and J. Raynis. 

& & 

BALTIMORE, Md.— The recent trip of the Baltimore 
Club to Braddock Heights was a pronounced suc- 
cess. Ideal weather and passably fair road conditions, 
together with a pleasing absence of mishaps, contributed 
largely toward the enjoyment of the trip, and the magnifi- 
cent view from the observatory at Braddock Heights was 
worth going twice as far to see. 

Capt. Fisher and Tourmaster Straus set an easy pace 
on the homeward trip — too easy, in fact, for some of the 
more ambitious riders. That the no miles was made 
in six hours' actual running time is a good showing, con- 
sidering the condition of the Frederick pike, which made 
careful riding imperative. 

Among those who made the trip were Capt. W. S. 
Fisher, Matthew Gault, "Chic" Thomas, John Blakeney, 



Charles Moore, W. Rayner Straus, Theodore W. Smith, 
James Blanch, Casper Swope French, Howard A. French, 
William Wood, W. S. Hamburger, Clarence Knight, D. 
Reitz. W. J. Warner, S. H. Congdon, W. J. Downey and 
F. Groscup, all of the Baltimore Motorcycle Club; Capt. 
W. L. Nicodemus, William Hopkins, H. H. Hopkins. E. 
Butler, George Leakin, Howard Smith and John De 
Lachmutt, of the Mount Airy Motorcycle Club; Capt. 
Charles M. Gosnell, Lawrence J. Geddes and J. K. Graham 
of the Relay Motorcycle Club, and M. H. Berryman and 
"Pat" Throop of the Capital City Motorcycle Club. 

TERRE HAUTE, Ind.— Organization of the Terre 
Haute Motorcycle Club, the first organization of the 
kind in this city, was effected at a recent meeting. The 
following officers were chosen: President, Ed Sayre; vice- 
president, Fred Probst; secretary and treasurer, Frank B. 
Marshall. Twenty-one members joined the new club 
at its inception, and there is promise of a larger mem- 
bership in the future. The following will be named in 
the charter: Fred Probst, William Jenny, F. W. Strong, 
Ed Strong, Otis Landers, William Fauve, Joe Lang, Ed 
Palmer, Jacob Stark, Charles Johnson, W. C. Twigg. Ed 
Sayre, G. B. Dinkle, W. G. Evans, F. R. Casebier, George 
Clear. Ross Evans, G. H. Loser, F. R. Brown, Carl Stahl 
and Howard Phillfps. 

& Jl 

MILWAUKEE. Wis.— The recently elected officers of 
the local club are: President, E. Fries; vice-presi- 
dent, S. Lacy Crolius; treasurer, Herman Taylor; secre- 
tary, Dr. M. J. Walk; captain, Fred Pierring; press agent, 
W. P. Cook; sergeant-at-arms, W. S. Harley; directors, 
Walter Davidson, J. J. Lantry, George Puis, F. A. Bremer 
and Ralph Sporleder; racing board, Fred Pierring, F. A. 
Bremer, Walter Davidson, W. P. Cook and J. J. Lantry. 

SAVANNAH, Ga.— Dawson Wylly is president, Ham- 
mond Eve vice-president, Walter Smith secretary, 
and George Lawdin treasurer of the newly organized club 
here. The organization intends to arrange for headquar- 
ters in the new Y. M. C. A. Building. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909. 




THE New Jersey Club will hold a race meet the 17th 
of this month. President Stevens has appointed a com- 
mittee consisting of George Fawcett, Holmes Wright, 
Percy Drummond, Kenneth Moore and J. W. Schneider, 
to make preliminary arrangements for the affair, which 
will take place at the Olympic Park track. 

While no definite program has as yet been outlined, 
the tentative plans call for several races between ma- 
chines of not over 30V2 inches piston displacement, one 
of which is to be at the full Marathon distance of 
twenty-six miles, 385 yards. For this Ray B. Whitehead 
has already offered to donate a silver cup. Most of the 
races will be open, and it is expected that all of the 
crack metropolitan speed merchants will enter, including 
Goerke and Chappie. Exhibition races against time with 
the big twin-cylinders, with the view of establishing new 
track records from one to ten miles, are also carded. 

What will probably prove to be the feature of the meet 
is a series of gymkhana events, which will include spear- 
ing potatoes while going at full speed; a mile race, in 
which the contestants will start with machines fully 
equipped with lamp, horn and tool bag, which are to be 
removed at the half-mile point, when the riders will re- 
mount and finish the race. Another half-mile race calls 
for the men to carry an egg on a ladle. 

Invitations will be extended to the motorcyclists in 
Paterson, Plainfield, Jersey City and other nearby towns 
to schedule runs to Olympic Park that day, and it is ex- 
pected to make this the banner event in Jersey circles 
for the year. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I.— Fourscore riders took part in 
the picture run held Sunday, June 21, under the aus- 
pices of the Providence Club. Those who made the run 
were: Harry Wilkinson, Charles H. Westcott, R. J. Bur- 
lingame, Frank Labonte, John G. Gardiner, R. H. 
Boedeker, Arthur Gandreau, Peter S. Hayes, Charlie 
Grant, R. C. Eccleston, L. D. Eccleston, S. O. Barber, 
J. H. Bailey, H. S. Saul, Fred Fiske, F. C. Wilkinson, 
J. G. Edwards, John B. Gandreau, Fred Ennis, Andrew 
Carlson, Carl Smith, Charles H. Oburt, A. Woodward, 
F. A. Rathburn, H. M. Peckham, William Beaulieu. A. V. 
Howe, Herbert Wilkinson, E. S. Ward, J. J. Hildrup, 
J. Stevens, Gardner Pettis, L. Brown, Frank Short, 
A. Clouthier, A. Precourt, A. Aplin, W. Robilard, O. A. 
Precourt. A. A. Precourt, E. A. Swenson, J. M. Fordon, 
Frank O. Johnson, A. Beauvois, C. J. Swanson, Klaes Ols- 
son, E. C. Foster, W. H. Connolly, G. A. Brown, H. M. 
Jones, Elmer Stewart, James Burnell, T. H. Cooper, J. W. 
Newton, J. Whittaley, G. H. Hartsell, F. Hawkins, 
J. White, N. C. Crumper, F. Beauvois, A. Hudson, 
Charles Isaheen, A. B. Hanscom, F. E. Stratton, Mrs. 
Henry Sears. Henry Sears, N. D. Benson, C. H. Frazier, 
William Jones, Carl Tourtellot, R. W. Pellett, C. N. 
Hutchins, A. Moore, A. Hanson, F. Derkins, B. A. Swen- 
son, Albert Larson, F. Henderson, E. Wilkinson, P. 
Molde, William Friend. 

«^» id* 

SAN FRANCISCO.— Several members of the local club, 
led by W. E. Sieman and E. Eickelberger, made the trip 
to the top of Mount Hamilton, the evening of Saturday, June 
12th. There they had a splendid view of the constellations 
through the telescope at Lick Observatory. The following day 
a large number of San Francisco and Oakland riders made 
the same trip, accompanied by many young women. 



PHILADELPHIA.— Under weather conditions that 
tried the pluck and stamina of the participants, 
and converted the sociability run of the Philadelphia 
Motorcycle Trade Association into an endurance test of 
the severest description, the second of a series of such 
runs between this city and Reading and return, was held 
Sunday, June 27. 

At a few minutes past 8 o'clock in the morning, fifty- 
four dyed-in-the-wool cyclists, checked in at Broad and 
Spring Garden streets, and started on the long run. The 
center of attraction was Miss Agnes Murray, of 1922 
North Thirtieth street, the only woman entrant, who has 
established an enviable record as a motorcyclist. Mis? 
Murray rode splendidly, and in spite of the bad conditions 
and several spills as a result of the washed-out condition 
of the roads, she finished with a clean score, something 
that many of her male companions failed to do. 

The course was laid out with controls at this city. Potts- 
town and Reading, and injunctions were given the riders 
that strict attention would be given to the time of arrival 
at controls, and those who were either early or late in 
checking would forfeit their chances of obtaining a clean 
score medal. 

Those qualifying in their first run received a silver 
medal, and subsequently clean scores secured for the rider 
a silver link for each run, to complete a silver watch fob. 
Those completing the trip with clean scores were Miss 
Agnes Murray, Joseph Murray, Alexander Klein, George 
Reinbold, N. Thiel, John Keating, George L. Dengler, of 
Reading; C. D. Failer, C. V. Stahl and H. Wolf. The 
affair was in charge of ar committee composed of William 
G. Rhoades, chairman; C. V. Stahl and L. J. Springer. 
& Jl 

CINCINNATI, O.— E. M. Buerger, Olin Ross, W. D. 
Weaver and Jacob Sachs captured the firsts in the 
seven events run off under the auspices of the 
Queen City Motorcycle Club and the National Turnfest, 
at the Carthage fair grounds here, the 23d of June. The 
summaries: 

Two-mile, under 20 cubic inches. — First, W. D. Weaver 
(Thor); second, Otto Miller (Thor); third, R. W. Lucas 
(Thor). Time 3:^0. 

Pursuit race, 15 mile limit. — Olin Ross (Indian) caught 
R. W. Lucas (Thor) in the seventh lap. 

Five mile open.— First, E. M. Buerger (Merkel); second. 
Olin Ross (Indian); W. D. Weaver (Thor). Time, 
7:48 1-5. 

Three-mile open. — First, E. M. Buerger (Merkel) ; sec- 
ond, Olin Ross (Indian); R. W. Lucas (Thor). Time, 
4:4f 

Ten-mile handicap. — Olin Ross (Indian); second, E. M. 
Buerger (Merkel); R. W. Lucas (Thor). Time, 15:13 1-5. 

Full Marathon distance (26 miles, 385 yards). — First, 
E. M. Buerger (Merkel); second, R. W. Lucas (Thor); 
third, Olin Ross (Indian). Time 39:42. 

One-sixteenth of a mile slow race. — Won by Jacob 
Sachs (New Era). 

DAYTON, O.— Fred Huyck and H. Nixon divided the 
honors at the race meet held here on the 19th, under 
the auspices of the local club. The summaries : 

Three miles, under 20 cubic inches — First, I. Howich, Day- 
ton (Indian) ; second, Kenneth Allen, Dayton (Thor) ; time, 

5.26^. 
Two miles, open for 30.50 cubic inches — First, Fred Huyck,. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



19 



Springfield, Mass (Indian) ; second, Harvey Bernard, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. (Harley-Davidson) ; time, 2.41. 

Five mile handicap — Huyck, first; Bernard, second; time, 
6.40 1/5. 

Pursuit race, limit 10 miles— Huyck, first; W. Berner, In- 
dianapolis (Reading Standard), second. The time was not 
announced, as the race was protested by Berner, of In- 
dianapolis, who claimed that he had not been passed, although 
the referee, acting under instructions of one of the judges, 
gave the red flag to Huyck, causing him to stop. 

Match race between Gross, Allen, Howich and Nixon for 
the championship of Dayton. At the end of the 3rd lap 
Allen had a fall and was rendered unconscious for a few 
moments. He was not seriously hurt, however, but the race 
was called off. 

Five mile open: Huyck, first; Berner, second; time, 6.45. 

Three mile open for racing machines — Huyck, first; Nixon, 
second; time, 4.03^. 

Three mile challenge club cup race, for members of the 
Dayton Motorcycle Club: Won by Harry Nixon (Indian); 
Harry Gross (Thor), second; time, 4.11. 

Five mile handicap: Harry Nixon, first; Bernard, second; 
time, 6.52. 

Unlimited pursuit race : Won by Fred Huyck on an Indian. 

Jl <!* 

SACRAMENTO.— The following is the summary of the 
races recently conducted under the joint auspices of the 
San Francisco and Oakland Club on the local track: five 
mile double, for Sacramento riders— First, A. Ruhlsdaller 
(Thor); second, Burnett (Indian); time 7.18^. Five mile 
double, stock machines, open— First, Collins (Indian) ; second 
Karslake (Curtiss) ; third, Chelini (Thor) ; time 515. Three 
mile novelty— First, Eikelberger (Thor) ; second, Dreyer (In- 
dian) ; time 4.52^. Ten mile open— First, Collins (Indian) ; 
second, Chelini (Thor); third, Eikelberger (Thor) ; time 
11.13. Five mile single, open— First, Collins (Indian) ; 
second Chelini (Thor) ; third, Dreyer (Indian) ; time 5-i9*£ 
Pursuit race, 15 mile limit— Collins caught Dreyer in the sixth 
mile and Chelini in the seventh. Twenty-five mile, open- 
first, Collins (Indian) ; second, Chelini (Thor) ; third, Bur- 
nett (Indian) ; time, 10 miles, 10.45; 15 miles, 15.46; 20 miles, 
21.13; 25 miles, 26.44. 

& J* 

WORCESTER, Mass.— Marvin Booth and Archibald E. 
E. Morse have left this city for a 2,200-mite trip awheel 
to Earlgrey, Canada. They have purchased a tract of land in 
that country, where they will make their permanent home. 



TO BOSTON AND BACK IN 26}4 HOURS. 



COMING EVENTS. 

July 5 — Races at Yates County Fair, Penn Yan, 
N. Y. 

July 5— Topeka, Kan., race meet. 

July 5 — Forty miles road race, Mishawaka, Ind., to 
Goshen and return. 

July 5_Courtland Beach track meet, Omaha, Neb. 

July 5 — Birmingham, Ala., race meet. 

July 5— South Bend, Ind., 40 miles road race. 

July 5 — Charter Oak race meet, Hartford, Conn. 

July 4-5— San Francisco, Cal.— San Francisco 
Motorcycle Club's 500 miles endurance 
contest. 

July 8, 9, 10— Chicago reliability run. 

jul y 17— New Jersey Club's race meet at Olympic Park. 

July 18— New York and Brooklyn, N. Y.— Eastern 
Division Century Road Club Association's 
annual mid-summer century run to Say- 
ville and return to Jamaica; open. 

August 1— Brooklyn, N. Y.— Long Island Division, 
Century Road Club Association's bicycle 
and motorcycle century run; open. 



r- - . s . -■ ■ :■ II 


T. K. Hastings Rode 1 j^lH 
508 M. in That Time. 1 


- 


^c V £ 


; 




< 

— 



TK. HASTINGS, who a few days ago undertook to motor- 
• cycle from New York to Boston and back within twenty 
four hours, though he reached the Hub City almost on time, 
lost about two hours on the return trip, making 508.8 miles in 
26^2 hours. 

Mr. Hastings's start was witnessed by a considerable 
crowd. With the N. Y. P. C. A. A. colors flying from his 
handle-bar, and bearing a message from the Association 
to the Boston Press Club, he got the word from President 
James E. Sullivan, of the N. Y. P. C. A. A. promptly at 
noon, the time being taken by H. O. Van Shuckmann. 
Hastings met with no accident any more serious than the 
fouling of a spark plug. 

THE Pueblo Motorcycle Club held its first race meet at 
the course near Lake Minnequa recently. The following 
were the results: 

Three miles, for single cylinders: C. R. Hoxie, Harley- 
Davidson, first; Coleman, Harley-Davidson, second; Lichten- 
berger, Harley-Davidsoa, third. Time, 4 minutes. 

Five miles, for single cylinders: Springer, Indian, first; 
Schmitt, Harley-Davidson, second. 

Three miles, free-for-all : Atterbury, "R. S.," first ; Maxwell, 
Excelsior, second; Glenn, "R. S.," third. Time 4:15 

Fourth race, time trials for single cylinders, won by Schmitt 
on a Harley-Davidson. Time, 1 :i3. 

Fifth race, time trials for twin cylinders: Won by Springer, 
on an Indian, Time, 1:11 2-5. 

JACKSON, Mich. — The following is a summary of a 
series of three races recently held here: 

One mile — Won by Corliss Griffes (Thor); second, Carl 
Zanton (Reading Standard). Time, 2:074-5. 

Five-mile handicap — Won by Leaverton (Excelsior), 10 
seconds; second, Burman (Indian), 20 seconds; third, 
Van Deusen (Thor), 15 seconds; fourth, Klark (N. S. U.) f 
scratch. Time, 7:42 4-5. 

Ten-mile handicap — Won by Klark (N. S. U.), scratch; 
second, Leaverton (Excelsior), 20 seconds; third, Bur- 
man (Indian), one minute. 

WALTHAM, Mass.— W. A. F. Estes, president of the 
Waltham Club, is enjoying a trip through Maine. He 
has laid out a general plan for the three weeks that he will 
be away, and will make trips. east, north and west, and will 
possibly include runs to the coast. He expects to cover 
between 1800 and 2000 miles. 

J* & 

TRENTON, N. J.— The Clifton Stadium Company, of 
Paterson, has just been incorporated. The company 
is organized to conduct motorcycle, bicycle and other 
races. It is capitalized at $10,000, and the incorporators 
are Charles F. Turville, J. Frank Galvin and William H. 
Marcy. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



21 



THE HOME OF THE YALE. 

THE "home" of the Yale 3 l / 2 h. p. motorcycle, The Consoli- 
dated Manufacturing Company, 1729-39, Toledo, Ohio, is 
the largest plant in the country, devoted to the exclusive 
manufacture of bicycles, motorcycles and their parts, and the 
new machine, so popular this year, is evidence of the un- 
limited facilities and careful constructive methods available. 

In the machine room are installed numerous up-to-date 
machines, especially adapted to motorcycle and bicycle work. 
Every part turned out is machined in special jigs and gauged 
with micrometers. The care exercised in this department in- 
sures excellent results from the complete motor. 

The illustration on the opposite page shows the frame 
building department. Every frame is built to exact measure- 
ment, from specially tested tubing and drop forged connec- 
tions, in jigs of special design, insuring absolute alignment. 
Brazing is in an open fire, by men having years of experi- 
ence in this work and every care is exercised to see that this 
most important feature of motorcycle building is perfect. 

The enameling room is the most commodious of any fac- 
tory, having six ovens with an immense daily output. Every 
part enameled is first treated to a coat of anti-rust, then baked, 
after which it is subjected to several hand rubbings with 
pumice and receives four coats of enamel, the last being a 
very high lustre varnish. 

The assembling room is the next department. All motors 
are assembled, crank case filled with oil and jacked out in a 
special built stand for this work. A belt running from over- 
head shaft to drive pulley, turns the motor at 400 r. p. m. for 
five hours, insuring a perfect fit of piston, piston rings and 
bearings, before being tested under power. The frames and 
forks are put together by skilled mechanics, having years of 
experience in this particular line of work. Next the engine 
men hang motor in the frame, put in the tank, handle bar, 
attach grip control, etc., when it is ready to test by being 
hitched to a generator, connected to a switchboard, having 
volt and ammeter registers, which show exactly what each 
motor is capable of doing. Every motor is made to show full 
rated horse power before it is allowed to leave this depart- 
ment. 

After testing, the complete motorcycle is taken to the 
crating department and made ready for shipment. The 
crates used by the Yale people are the most substantial, being 
well made from heavy material and while adding slightly to 
the weight, it is the best possible insurance that the motor will 
reach destination in perfect order. 

The '09 Yale $ l / 2 ' h. p. motorcycle has come into its own and 
ranks with the best machines built to-day. Present indications 
point to a very large output for 1909. 

CT. LOUIS, Mo. — Progressiveness in an agent is seldom 
^ better exemplified than in the case of the Thor repre- 
sentative in this city. With a view to advertising the 
Thor this agent has inserted the following notice in a 
local newspaper: 

"Born to Charles H. Neff, the 8th street jeweler, twins. 
The name is Thor, and can be seen at Reed's motorcycle 
shop any time. They will be seen in the street as soon 
as the weather permits. Reed Motor Works, 311 South 
8th street." 

MOTOR cycles are destined to play an important part 
should a war break out in which Italy is one of the 
belligerents. A well-equipped motorcycling scouting corps 
is now maintained on the Italian side of the Alps, and 
has attained a remarkable proficiency in scaling the steep 
mountain roads and manceuvering through the narrow, 
snow-lined passes. 

Goshen, Ind. — The Excelsior is represented here by 
Lawrence Bigler, who has already sold 20 machines this 
season. 



TIRE MAKING BY MACHINERY. 




The Old-Fashioned Method. 

THE Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company has been working 
for years to perfect a tire-making machine that would 
turn out the right kind of Goodyear tires, and now it has 
several in operation. 

By the old way of making tires by hand, they have been 
built up, first a layer of fabric, then a layer of rubber and 
another layer of fabric, and so until the body was complete. 
This fabric has always had to be stretched on by hand by 
men skilled in tire making. The durability and longevity of a 
tire would be largely dependent on the skill and strength of 
the workmen who made it. To give the greatest mileage 
this fabric must be stretched to an absolutely even tension 
over each portion of the tire, and each alternate layer must 
be given the same tension as those previously put on. 

It is self-evident that this evenness of tension could not 
be given when human hands were depended upon, as tires 
made in the morning when a man is fresh will be stretched 
more tightly and evenly than later in the day, when his 
muscles have become weary. 

The new Goodyear machine gives a positively even tension 
to every strip of fabric used in every tire. The accompanying 
illustrations show both the old method of laying fabric by 
hand and the new way by the Goodyear tire-making machine. 




The New Way— Goodyear Method. 

A view of the Goodyear tire-making machine, showing how the fabric 
is rolled down after it is stretched over the core. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



A Page. 

American Motor Co Cover IV 

Auto-Bi Co 33 

American Motorcycle Co 40 

Aurora Automatic Machinery Co 25 

B 

Badger Brass Mfg. Co 36 

Bosch Magneto Co., Inc 29 

Breeze Carbureter Co 39 

c 

Corbin Screw Corporation 30 

£ 

Excelsior Supply Co 23 

Empire Tire Co 35 

Emblem Mfg. Co 34 

Eclipse Machine Co 31 

F 

F. A. M 39 

G 

G & J Tire Co 33-40 

Goodrich Co., B. F Cover III-38 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 27 

Grossman Co., Emil 38 



H Pa««- 

Hendce Mfg Co Cover I 

Harley-Davidson Motor Co 37 

Hansen Mfg. Co., O. C 39 

Hornecker Motor Mfg. Co 40 

Herring Curtiss Co 26 

J 

Jeffrey DeWitt Co 36 

Jenkins, Geo. P 26 

K 

Kokomo Rubber Co 30 

Karl Co., Inc., Adolf 39 

Lyons Motor Co., Geo. V 40 

M 

Merkel-Light Motor Co 28 

Morgan & Wright 29 

Mesinger Mfg. Co., H. & F 35 

Motorcycle Equipment Co 26 

McLaughlin & Ashley Co 40 

Morrison-Ricker Mfg. Co 38 

Majestic Mfg. Co 37 

N 

New Departure Mfg. Co 32 

N. S. U. Motor Co 36-40 

New Era Gas Engine Co 39 



O Page. 

Ovinglon Motor Co 35 

P 

Pfanstiehl Elcc. Laboratory 24 

Prospect Motor Co 26 

Pittsfield Spark Coil Co 28 

Pennsylvania Rubber Co 34 

Parker Mfg. Co 35 

Prest-O-Lite Co 31 

R 

Reading Standard Co Cover II 

Rose Mfg. Co 32 

Reliance Motorcycle Co 39 

s 

Shaw Mfg. Co 38 

Splitdorf, C. F 38 

T 

20th Century Mfg. Co 35 

Tiger Cycle Works Co 40 

Tingley & Co., Chas. 40 

Thiem Mfg. Co 40 

V 

Veeder Mfg. Co 37 



MANUFACTURER AND AGENT. 



Cheyenne, Wyo. — The local Indian Agency is in charge 
of Sampson Bros. 

Phoenix, Arizona. — The local Greyhound agency has 
been procured by Clyde Blaine. 

Minneapolis. — The Edwards Cycle Company is now 
handling the Merkel, Light, Wagner and F. N. 

Luverne, Minn. — L. A. McDowell, of Hardwick, has 
taken the agency for the Thor for all of Rock County. 

Providence, R. I. — B. A. Swenson, local Indian agent, 
reports that he has already sold eighty machines this year. 

A. J. Hippel, Thor agent, is travelling through the State 
of Illinois demonstrating the product of the Aurora Auto- 
matic Machinery Company. 

Chicago. — Thor machines were used by the officials of 
the automobile race meet at Crown Point for their execu- 
tive messenger service and signal corps. 

John Moore & Co., 59 Warren street, New York City, 
have secured the agency for the Yale 3^2 h.p., and they 
are certain of their ability to make numerous sales of this 
machine in the metropolitan district 



The Tiger Cycle Works Company, 782 Eighth avenue, 
New York, has in stock upwards of a score of first-class 
second-hand machines, at prices varying from $40 to $250. 
They are going rapidly, however, and those who cannot 
call would do well to send for the company's second-hand 
list. 

J* Jl 

R. A. Pickens, advertising and general sales manager of 
the American Motor Company, of Brockton, Mass., heads 
a new company to open up the largest exclusive sales- 
room and distributing depot in the world, located at 
Dallas, Texas, where M. M. Motorcycles and parts will 
be handled exclusively. Mr. Pickens will open up early 
in July and establish a large sales organization to cover 
the Southern and Southwestern States, together with the 
country of Mexico. 

The M. M. factory has accepted a large order for ma- 
chines, to be shipped immediately to Dallas, where a 
large stock of machines, parts and accessories will be 
carried ready for instant delivery in any quantity. Mr. 
Pickens leaves for the Southwest with the best wishes of 
all his friends throughout the trade. This makes the 
eighth link in the M. M. chain of stores. 




Curtiss Riders Starting for a Double Century. 



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23 



NEW DRY CELL ON THE MARKET 

In presenting the Union Dry Cell to the battery 
users The Union Battery Company, of Belleville, N. J., 
has kept in mind the need of a perfect ignition battery 
that would withstand the racket given bat- 
teries by most motorists, and still give per- 
fect ignition wi{h a fat hot spark. 

Much time has been spent inexperiment- 
ing and perfecting this cell, until now the 
manufacturer feels confident that Un- 
ions will give better service, retain 
life longer and put forth more energy than 
an) r cell now on the market. Their quick 
recuperation after a heavy demand is un- 
equaled. Upon test with a standard am- 
meter they register over 25 amperes with 
a voltage of 1 6/10; but the real proof of 
their value can be found only by their use. 

San Francisco. — Joe Holle, the Northern Califor- 
nia agent for the Harley-Davidson, has been keeping 
the wires hot trying to induce the factory to ship him 
enough machines to fill his orders. The Harley-Davidson 
was the first belt-driven motorcycle to reach the summit 
of Mt. Tamalpais, Marin County, Cal. George Thompson 
of this city accomplished this most remarkable feat last 
August, riding over the tires between the railroad tracks. 

GOODRICH COMPANY'S EASTERN HOME 





This is the building, now nearing completion and already 
described in these columns, which is being erected by the 
Goodrich Tire Company on Broadway near 57th street, 
New York. This fine structure will serve as the company's 
Eastern distributing house. 




EXCELSIOR 

Auto-Cycle 

THE MACHINE 
FOR SERVICE 

The productive cost of Excelsior 
Auto-Cycles is all in the stock ma- 
chine as delivered to the buyer. 

We build no special racers, employ 
no corps of hired riders, but build our 
reputation on the accomplishment 
and absolute dependability of every 

EXCELSIOR 

Auto-Cycle 



in the constant daily service of the 
satisfied riders who paid for them. 
Ask your friend who rides one, or see 
an agent and let him show you, or 
write for our new art catalog M. I. 40. 

Excelsior Supply Co. 

(Established 1876) 

233-23 7 Randolph Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

STANLEY T. KELLOGG, Eastern 

Distributor, 2232 Broadway, New 

York, N. Y. 



m 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE MART— IT SELLS THE STUFF 
Buy, Sell; Exchange. Two Centt a Word. Cash With Copy 



f»Oft *ALE OR EXCHANGE 



VOU SALfc — Indian Tricar, in good condition, with 
fttt«*-liftirtitf* 1nr mt*j Indian motorcycle, including fan; 
t\uhU sale, $o$oa J. W, Dickinson, 36 *'carl Court, New 
flrttaifi, (dim, 

VOH SALf'V- IV tk C. J speed «car, New— never used. 
l f \1s any motor Indian type, A. J. Carpenter, 1405 K. 82nd 
street, Cleveland, Ohio, 

I'OK KXCIf AN(#K One Columbia chainlcss bicycle for 
tnotoreyclej will pay difference. A. A. Jordan, 264 Tomp- 
kins street, Athens, Ga. 

FOR SAM*" tgno, loop frame magneto twin, cost $275; 
will sell for $175. 1008 twin Indian, $125; must sell. 
Fred Lloyd, MeKresport, Pa, 

FOR KXCIIANGK -One Cadillac single cylinder run- 
about for l\ N, four cylinder or other high power 
motorcycle, H, T, Kppn, 120 Washington street, Athens, Ga. 

FOR FXCHANGK — Ford Auto for two or four cylinder 
motorcycle, V, C. Walter, Viola, Wis. 



j c 



AGENTS CARDS. ETC. 



FOR SAt.lv 1008 a$i Indian, perfect running order; a 
$U?i machine for $too. N. E, Ramsey, Lincolnton, N. C. 

FOU SALK- Heat offer, new 1909 jjrj-h.p. Indian; per- 
fect condition, magneto, cyclometer, toolbag, tools, luggage 
carrier; ridden too miles; cost $250. Box 19, Water- 
proof, I, a, 



FOR SAI K Good Indian, best bargain ever; lamp, 
horn, stand, tools, Charles P. Palmer, 22 South Fifth 
street, Duu.uesne, Pa, 

MOTORCYCLE LEGISLATION. 

per annum* are required. License numbers must be two 
inches in height, of white metal on a black background. 
Lamps must be carried after dark, A comparatively 
large number of motorcyclists have been arrested in Mil- 
waukee thus far this >casom ami it is said that riders of 
motorcycle* do not enjoy the same privileges whkh are 
allowed to automobile riders* 

Vermont 0— Mo to rvyvles are classed with the automobile 
i\\ \\\\\ Stale i'he b cense fee is $2, Exemptions are 
granted t\> nou cesuleuts. Speed hunts are 10 miles 
wuhm incorporated municipal bounds* and 25 miles 
elsewhere. No special proMMon is made as to the sice of 
the hecn«c numbers wWh motorcyclists are supposed to 
attach to thor nuch^cs. 

VitTtfiwiA. Vbc mosor v^hvlc Uw of this State provides 
that ^notVovsfc m tV^s act shall apply to the machines 
l<uov<u as UACiiott engines* or to any locomotive engines 
or eW\t*K- c*rs rwnvt\£ on ra^s^ or to motor bicycles^' 

Wttftt Vitflttvi*. T>e 1*^ of thss State contain absvv 
lut^lv m> yjroxswtf! xnhvh *rOtt3d *pp3y to motorcycle. 

Wjw*vi«v(tv--T>etT aw no A«Tortio^e or motorcycle 

Haxics ov> t>,c *nt«t* Kv& it* this State, 

td*W<v T>,<* State has ru> laws rcs-aUnng wsotor vehi- 

v^v vV" Ar k \ Vr* f . The iv,atier is er.;^rc;\ cvvn trowed by 

\r n r v v* * a c. ; Vk ^ ; >es.. 



FOR SALE — New 5-h.p. twin Indian $200; second hand 
5-h.p. twins, $125 up; singles, $75 up. F. B. Widmayer 
Company, 2312 Broadway, New York City. 

FOR BARGAIN'S in second hand motorcycles, Merkels, 
Indians and M. M., call at the M. M. Motorcycle store, 38 
Belleville Ave., Newark, N. J. 

EXHAUST WHISTLES and hand idlers for M. M. 
motorcycles. French, 895 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

FOR SALE— N. S. U. 3#-h.p. Road Racer, with 2 speed 
gear, run less than 500 miles, bargain, $185; N. S. U. 6-h.p. 
Twin, 2 speed, $195; 2 cylinder '08 Indian, $150; Indian 2%- 
h.p., $80; other fine bargains. Stanley Kellogg, Eastern 
Distributor Excelsior Autocycles, 2334 Broadway, New 
York. 

MOTORCYCLES — 35 second hand machines on hand, all 
makes; $40 up. Send stamp for descriptive circular. Tiger 
Cycle Works Co., 782 Eighth avenue, New York City. 

MOTORCYCLES thoroughly overhauled and repaired. 
Agents for Thor motorcycles, parts and sundries. Brazenor 
& Ruderman, 849 Bedford avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ACCESSORIES at prices that will surprise you; send 
for our large catalogue. Motorcycle Equipment Co., Ham- 
mondsport, N. Y. 

M-M and R-S MOTORCYCLES— East End Cycle Co., 
Highland & Beitler, near Centre Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

* : j 

FOR SALE — Excelsionautocycle. 1909 model. In good 
working order. Fred Brady, Mendota, 111. 



PACIFIC COAST ENTHUSIASM. 

Los Angeles. — Never before in the history of the busi- 
ness in Southern California has the demand for the 
two-wheeler been so great, and never has it been 
so difficult to induce the factories to increase the 
assignment for coast consumption. Every dealer in the 
city is booked months ahead on orders, and almost every 
new machine is put on the streets in service within twenty- 
four hours of its arrival here. Retailers in the nearby 
cities are clamoring for more motors and are even willing 
to pay express charges from the factories in the East — 
a matter of more than $25 per machine — to get them here 
quickly to supply the insistent demands of their cus- 
tomers, 

Logtnsport, Ind.— Walter B. Lewis, representative of 
the Aurora Automatic Machinery Company, has sold a 
Thor to the local police department. 

Dallas, Tex.— J, \\\ Ruff has just secured the Harley- 
Pa\idson agfnev for this territory. 



A FIVE YEAR GUARANTEE 

ON ALL PFANSTtEHL MOTORCYCLE COILS 



; mism aout mam "-*£ 



X ."*■/? /i /f'^vjisS *****.;. o* ;W p/j^rr whrm «»■»>}*£ jtdzif-tiss+s. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



25 





STILL THEY COME 

RECORD after RECORD 
BALKE of Los Angeles mounted on that SINGLE 
CYLINDER, the one that has them all guessing 

Wins 6 Mile Race, 5 min., 251 sec. 
Wins 8 Mile Race, 7 min., 291 sec. 

This 8 Mile Race is Amateur World's Record 



THEN 
THE 




TWIN 




STOCK MACHINE SHATTERS THE OVER- 
LAND PARK TRACK RECORDS at Denver, 
Col., June 15. Mile after mile in 1. 03—20 miles 
in 23 min., 9 sec. Going Some on a dirt track 
for stock goods. 

Our Agents are selling the machines. Join 
their ranks and swell your bank account. Don't 
stock up with dead ones. 

Aurora Automatic Machine Co. 

Thor Building, Chicago 

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July 1. 1909. 



PLEASED WITH THE R-S. 

THE Reading Standard Company 
has for several years past fur- 
nished the Newark, N. J., police force 
with machines. This year the entire 
force was again equipped with the 
R-S, which is giving splendid satisfac- 
tion in every way. The Buffalo police 
force is also using R-S motorcycles, 
and the following two letters are evi- 
dence that the heads of these two de- 
partments are pleased with their in- 
vestment: 

"This Department has used your 
Reading Standard motorcycles for 
nearly one year. They have given 
excellent satisfaction. Especially are 
they useful in enforcing the law regu- 
lating the speed of motor vehicles. 
"Yours respectfully, 

Wm. Hamgan, President 
"Commissioners of Police." 
"Newark, N. J. 



"Wc are using in this department 
several of the Reading Standard 
motorcycles which were purchased 
from your establishment, and we de- 
sire to express our perfect satisfaction 
with the same. The expense attendant 

upon keeping them in condition is very slight, and we feel 
that we are able to endorse them as being among the very 
best cycles in the market. 

"Respectfully, 




Newark Motorcycle Police, Mounted on R-S Machines. 



Buffalo, N. Y. 



"J. A. Taggire, 
"Clerk, Board of Police." 
J* 



Hammondsport, N. Y. — The Herring-Curtiss Company 
writes: "We have practically completed a large addi- 
tion to our plant, 60x150 feet. This is concrete and fire- 
proof throughout. The demand for our machines has been 
so great the past season that we have not been able to 
fill our orders. With the added floor space which this 
building will give us we hope to be able to take care of 
all of our customers for 1910. The new model which we 
will bring out next season promises to be a great success." 



Chauncey Cleveland, H. Bernard Layman and Priscilla 
Wallace are the incorporators of the North American 
Motor Corporation, of Stapleton, Staten Island, N. Y. The 
new company's capital is $io,ooo, and the manufacture of 
motorcycles is one of the objects of its incorporation. 

Capitalized at $25,000, the Standard Sporting & Motor 
Goods Company has been incorporated under the laws of 
the State of New York. The company, which will deal in 
motorcycles among other things, will do business in New 
York City. 

J* ** 

Brooklyn, N. Y.— The S. D. M. is the name of a new 
shaft-driven machine which is being produced by J. R. 
Spangler and George Dewald, partners, whose headquarters 
are at 155 Ridgewood avenue. 



"Wouldn't take a Thousand Dollars for 
his Curtiss Motorcycle." 

Altoona, Pa., May 28, 1909. 
Herring-Curtiss Company, 

Hammondsport, N. Y. 
Gentlemen:— 

Machine arrived in fine condition. I have 'had three 
different makes in my time, and must say that your 
machine for Power, Speed, Hill Climbing and Easy 
Starting can never be beaten. I am more than 
pleased with this Httle steed of steel, and would not 
take ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS for it to-day 
if I couldn't get another one. 

Thanking you for vour prompt and courteous at- 
tention given my order, I am 

Yours very truly, 

A. M. CONRAD. 

This is one of hundreds of similar unsolicited tes- 
timonials received from Curtiss riders. 

Every Curtiss motorcycle is just as good as 
this one. 

Write for Agency Proposal to-day. 

HERRING-CURTISS COMPANY 

Hammondsport, N. Y. 
New York Distributor ^ 

CURTISS MOTORCYCLE COMPANY 

1203 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pacific Coast Distributor 

G. A. FAULKNER 

351 12th Street, Oakland, Cal. 




IMPROVED Belt Hook. Detachable roller link 
and self- locking screw. Price 25 cents 

PMJPECT MITII COMPANY, 111! Bntfway, N. Y. 



'.stMDFORtATAlOQUEi 
MOTORCYCLE SUPPLY CO. 

HAMMONDSPORT. N.V. 



Motorcycles in Stock 

3\ H. P. Single Cylinders 

With Bosch Matneto. $225 

7 H. P. Twin C ylinders 

New York Headquarters. 8 W. 60th St. 



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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



27 



The Toughest— Yet Easiest Riding 

MOTORCYCLE TIRE 



That's the Goodyear Moulded Clincher Motorcycle 
Tire. It wears the longest, costs the least for upkeep, 
and is easily repaired. Thus you will see that in 
all ways it saves the user money as compared to the 
cost of any other tire. 

See What a Perfect Tire 

A. L. Olds, of Toledo, Ohio, writes this 




about his experience with Goodyear Tires: 

"About two years ago I got a pair of your 
2y 2 x2S inch Motorcycle Tires for my demon- 
strating Wagner tandem, and I am pleased to say 
that these are still on the machine after covering 
4,000 miles over all kinds of roads, with two 
persons the greater part of the time, and often 
a total weight of over 550 pounds. 

"These tires are now in better shape than 
many which I have seen which have not been 
in use two weeks, and covered not to exceed 
400 miles, with a single rider. 

"The corrugations are not quite worn out 
of the middle of the tread, and there is not a 
cut, scratch or bruise in the casings, although 
I have run over newly crushed stone roads for 
miles, and have encountered all the usual 
objects in the city streets, such as broken glass, 
tin and cinders, but fortunately I have had no 
punctures." 



FurnislMd in single or doable clinch 

Four Plies of Toughest Fabric 

The wise motorcyclist who figures up the 
cost at the end of the season knows that the 
Goodyear is really the LOWEST PRICED 
tire on the market. It will outwear several 
pairs of the ordinary kind. 

Because the cover stock is of toughened 
rubber, the strongest made, especially treated, 
built for the extreme of wear, yet still retaining 
its resiliency. This is strengthened by the 
casing — moulded type — which has four plies 
of the strongest, toughest, most durable, most 
closely woven fabric, put into any motorcycle 
tire. This is the famous Sea Island fabric, 
which costs 55c a yard. We could use common 
muslin at Sy 2 c a yard. But it requires 300 
pounds to break Sea Island fabric, while com- 
mon muslin breaks at 40 to 60 pounds. Hence 
it wouldn't do for 



GoODjfftAR 



Moulded Clincher 
Motorcycle Tires 



The construction of this fabric is such that 
if a Goodyear Tire is cut or jagged by sharp 
stones, or other obstacles, it can be repaired 
easily. The fabric being so closely woven, it 
does not separate. 

And Goodyear Motorcycle Tires can be per- 
manently repaired. Some motorcycle tires are 
"done for'* just as soon as they are slightly 
damaged. 

The tube is of the same stock we use in our 
famous Red Seal Automobile Tubes. Butt end 
or endless type. 



The only rubber used in Goodyear tires is 
the finest of neic Para, quoted at $1.50 a pound 
today. We could use "Borneo" or "Guayule" 
at 35c a pound, or even "reclaimed" rubber 
from the junk pile at 10c a pound. But this 
wouldn't do for a Goodyear, any more than 
common muslin. With all their strength and 
durability Goodyear Gincher Motorcycle Tires 
are the most resilient, easiest riding. We can 
furnish them in either single or double clinch. 
Write for sample section. Get our special 
agency proposition. 



The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, Akronrohio 

RranrkAt* Atlanta. 90 North Pryor Street; Boston, 069 Boy If ton Street; Chicago. 82-84 Michigan Avenue; Buffalo. 219 Main 
OiautUCI. Street: Cincinnati. 317 Bast Fifth Street: Cleveland, 2005 Euclid Avenue; Deuvr. 28 West Colfax Avenue: Detroit. 251 
Jefferson Avenue: I-os Angele*. 949-951 South Main Street; New York City, 04th Street aud Broadway: Philadelphia. Broad and Falrmount 
Avenue*; Pittsburg. 30«8 Center Avenue; Sau Francisco, ii06 Golden Gate Avenue; St. Louis. 3903 3937 Olive Street; Washington, 1026 
Connecticut Avenue. 

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28 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909. 




TRACK RECORDS BROKEN BY THE 

FLYING MERKEL 



At Point Breeze track, Philadelphia, on June 12th 
Stanley T. Kellogg on Twin Merkel won the five 
mile and twenty-five mile open events, breaking 
the track records— both events. At the Hill Climb of the N. Y. M. Club at 
Hastings-on-the-Hudson, June 19th, Kellogg again demonstrated the speed of the 
Merkel by running a tie — the free for all class — the* fastest time ever made on the 
hill. At Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 23rd, Emil Buerges on a Single Cylinder Merkel 

won the five mile open, the three mile 30.50 class, 
the Marathon distance race, 26 miles 385 yards, 
and was second in the 10 mile handicap. 

There is SPEED, COMFORT and RELIABILITY in the MeAel 

MERKELLIGHT MOTOR COMPANY 

POTTSTOWN, PA. 

OVINGTON MOTOR CO., 2284 Broadway, New York Distributors. 

OLLIER & WORTHTNGTON, 1100 S. Main St., Loi Anffelea; 600 Golden Gate Ave., 

San Francisco, Cal., Pacific Coast Distributors. 

CATALOG ON REQUEST 




BE SURE 
YOU 
KNOW THE 




IT PAYS 
TO 
KNOW 



MOTORPYn ISTS • AVAIL YOURSELVES of the best in ignition 

ataw i v^axv^ i ^Lauj i aj . SY STEMS— USE A PITTSFIELD SYSTEM 




Don't get caught on the road with a defective 
Coil and have to trundle your motorcycle miles 
to the nearest repair shop. 

The Pitts&eld Motorcycle Coils will shoot 
the sime steady, efficient spark into your 
motor at all times. 

The mica insulation of the Pittsf ield Motorcycle 
Spark Plugs does not crack. It is practically oi-e solid mass 




3 Lead Motorcycle Coil 




4 Lead Motorcycle Cofl 



of mica. Specially prepared electrodes afford the maximum resistance to the high tension current. 
Maftneto Spark Piui U your Motorcycle a single orTwo cylinder one ? We have coils (or both in flat and conical ends. 



:TRY ONE 



PITTSFIELD SPARK COIL CO., Dalton, Mass. 

Sales Representatives: New England States, W. J. Conncll, 36 Columbus Avenue, Boston; Atlantic States,Thomas J. Wetzel. 29 West 
42nd Street, New York; Central States, K. Franklin Peterson, H.V. Greenwood, 166 Lake Street. Chicago; Michigan, L. D. Bolton, 319 
Hammond Building, Detroit; Pacific Coatt.The Laugenour Co., San Francisco, Cal. 



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July 1, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 29 

The machine used by Kellogg in his 

SENSATIONAL RACING 

at Point Breeze Track was an untried Merkel, only two hours from the factory, 

but then this motorcycle used the 



BOSCH MAGNETO 



the only ignition system insuring ALWAYS full, hot, properly timed sparks, a 

••bracer" for the motor, MAINTAINING ITS BEST EFFICIENCY 

throughout most trying tests. 

All HIGH CLASS Machines are "Bosch" Equipped. 



Interesting and handsomely illustrated literature describing the system, WHOSE NEVER FAILING 
ACCURACY enables you to FORGET YOUR IGNITION, sent on request. 

BOSCH MAGNETO COMPANY, 

CHICAGO BRANCH: 12S3 Michigan Avm.. Chicago. III. 223-225 Wmst 46th Strmmt, Nmw York, N. Y. 



When choosing your tires, remember this— 

Morgan & Wright Motorcycle Tires 

in just one year from their first appearance on the market have gained a reputation, 
this country over, for superior wearing qualities and general service satisfaction 
that cannot be denied. 

Figure it any way you wish, you must finally concede that such a result could 
only have been attained by some superior merit of the tires — a freedom from trouble, 
a length of service that appealed to their users as something far better than anything 
that had gone before. 

And that is true. 

Morgan & Wright tires have satisfied their users always and everywhere, 
many times actually surprising them by the extra long service they give, and are now 
enjoying the popularity and large sale they deserve. 

MORGAN & WRIGHT, Detroit 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 1, 1909, 



THE TIRE TROUBLE BUG-BEAR 

Won't "Bite" The Rider Whose Machine is Fitted With The 

Kokomo Gridiron Tread 



Long past the ex- 
perimental stage, this 
tire is all but inde- 
structible. If you 
want the best, Koko- 
mo will be your 
choice. 




The rubber abso- 
lutely sticks to the 
cloth, which is spe- 
cially made of close- 
ly-woven Sea Island 
fabric. 



KOKOMO RUBBER COMPANY 



SOUTH MAIN STREET 



KOKOMO, IND. 



POINTS OF EXCELLENCE 



Built Throughout 
for Motorcycle Use. 

y 2 inch Axle. 

Larger Bearings, 
giving longer fife. 

The Inside Diameter 

of the Brake 

Drum is 3 Inches, 

with Brake Shoes 

Yz inch wide, 
giving double the 
Braking Surface of 
Any Other Model. 




Corbin Motorcycle Coaster Broke Model 9 

Simple, Strong and Positive 

THE CORBIN 
SCREW CORPORATION 

New Britain, Conn. 

WAREHOUSES: 
No. 106-108-110 Lafayette Street, - NEW YORK. N. Y. 
N. W. Corner 8th and Arch Streets. - PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
No. 107-109 Lake Street. - - CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



Model 9 is 5f£ in. 

long outside of cones 

\\\ chain line. 

Model 9A is 6% in. 

' long outside of 

cones 

234 chain line. 

Made for either 

Belt or Chain Drive 

Motorcycles. 

Heavy Front Hub 
to match. 



LICENSED COASTER BRAKE MANUFACTURERS 



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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



31 




A GOOD, dependable lighting system is worth more than 
all the accident insurance you could buy. 

Feeble oil lamps and treacherous gas generators invite 
accident, danger and expense, and are a nuisance to operate. 

Most experienced automobilists have discarded all other 
equipment and adopted PrestOLHe. Motorcyclists are doing 
likewise. 

With Prest-O-Lite there is no uncertainty, no tinkering, 
no dirty work. The flame is always steady — doesn't flare up 
nor die down. Turned on and off like a gas jet. 

In automobile service, Prest-O-Lite has proven that it costs 
little if anything more than portable generating systems. 



The Prest-O-Lite Motorcycle Gas Tank is iz in. long and 
4 in, diameter. Weighs 7 pounds. Holds 10 ft. of gas — 40 

hours of light. 

PRIPF tlft FULL TANK 60c. 

1 lMV/Li *p 1 \J (I D Exchange for Empty) 
Thirty-day trial plan. See your dealer, or write us. 

The Prest-O-Lite Co., i^funapSil. iJa.' 

Branches at New York, Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco 
and Cleveland. 3,000 Exchange Agents 



Puts all Others in the Shade 



THE brake for novice or 
expert — for everybody. 

The Eclipse 1909 

Only Eight Parts, none 
of which is easily broken 
or put out of adjustment. 




The FIRST Coaster 
Brake designed for motor- 
cycle use. 

Coaster Brake 

The 1909 model has the 
largest braking surface 
ever used. 



SIMPLE, STRONG, EFFICIENT 

These qualities are most in demand in a Coaster Brake. Where any one 
is lacking, perfect service is impossible. We have been manufacturing 
Coaster Brakes for many years. You get the benefit of our experience. 

Write to us for particulars. 

ECLIPSE MACHINE COMPANY, Elmira, New York 

Licensed Coaster Brake Manufacturers 



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7,2 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Jcxy 1, 1909. 



^%W€)Wutn Motorcyde Oil Lamp 



^^■^^^^^B fc J i FJ ^ T^KZT^V^^k^^^^^^^^^^ 



Showing a Red Rear Light 




I of 

headlight and tail 

imp. 




The Neverout burns kerosene oil 10 hours with one 
filling and win stay lighted under any and all conditions. 

All riveted — will not rattle apart over the roughest roads. 

Sold on ten days* trial. Price $3.00 complete. 

The Neverout is equipped with a patent glass-covered 
reflector, made of pure German silver; never loses its origi- 
nal brilliancy; instantly removable. Guaranteed to stay 
lighted or money refunded. 

Made in gun metal, brass and nickel finish. 

The only perfect and reliable motorcycle lamp made. 

If your dealer cannot supply you, write us direct. 

Dealers: Write at once for our proposition. 



The NVverout Motorcycle Lamp, 
with combination tail light, showing 
xt'AX vifw, f Patented) 



Rose Manufacturing Co. 



933 ARCH STREET 



PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



WE MANUFACTURE THE CELEBRATED NEVEROUT ACETYLENE PATENT AIR 
COOLED GENERATOR AND MIRROR LENS 8EARCHL10HT FOR MOTORCYCLES 




NEW DEPARTURE 



••TWO-IN-ONE" 



BALL BEARINGS 

ARE BEING USED SUCCESSFULLY IN THE 
BEARING POINTS OF LEADING MOTOR- 
CYCLES. 



Mr. Manufacturer:— The New Departure offers you important 

advantages that you should investigate. We 
will furnish bearings for trial on application. Send us blue prints 
today. Our Engineering Corps is at your command. 

Hmvm you mmmn mur nmw Cmtmlog 7 

The New Departure Mfg. Co., BRISTOL ' CONN - 



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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



35 



No Danger 

There's no clanger of the Indianapolis G & J Double Clincher Motorcycle tire pulling 
or rolling off the rim when skidding or taking turns at a high rate of speed. No danger of it 
giving away no matter how swift the speed or how rough the road. 




Motorcycle Tires 

Are Absolutely Safe 



TRADE 
Look for it 



MARK 



Don't be a trailer and take the dust. Get into the better class. Use tires that you can have 
confidence in when you open the throttle. Use Indianapolis G & J*s. Write for booklet, 
illustrating and pricing our complete line. 

G A J TIRE COMPANY, Indianapolis, Ind. 

TO MOTORCYCLE BUYERS ! Yo * «■ !**• y°" r ^ cw ■•ffc~«i«pp«i wi* bduaapob c & j Tir« if 

^ ^ m ^ ^ ^ mm you say the word. You will not get the most for your nosey aaleat yon do. 



Greyhound Comfort 

is not matched in any other motorcycle. A new agent of ours out in Kansas writes on receiving 
his first Greyhound : 

"You can just say for me that she rides like a Pullman sure enough! The Greyhound 
Shock Absorber is all you 
claim for it, and then some." 

This is the verdict from all 
sides. 

Big tires and a perfect spring 
fork help a lot, hut that patented 
shock absorber of ours is the 
most important of all. The 
Greyhound is simple, strong 
and dependable. Write us if 
you want motorcycles either to 
ride or to sell Catalog free. 

1448 Niagara Street 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

OLDEST AMERICAN MOTORCYCLE MAKERS 

Sales Agents Metropolitan District: THE BROWN-DEWEY COMPANY, - - - 1697 Broadway, New York 
Sales Agent Chicago District: WHIPPLE, THE MOTORCYCLE MAN, 260 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IU. 




The Auto-Bi Company, 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 15, 1909. 



A Few Good Agents Wanted to Sell the 

SENSATION OF 1909 SEASON 



3i H.P. 

$175^ 




4H.P. 
$20(h°° 



EMBLEM MOTORCYCLES 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Emblem Manufacturing Co., angola, n. y. 



LET THESE TIRES TAKE 
UP THE ROAD SHOCKS 

AND 

VIBRATIONS 



The new idea of motorcycle tire equipment is to save the ma- 
chine and driver from the continuous violent jarring of intense 
power propelling a light vehicle. No other means can accom- 
plish this so completely as 

PENNSYLVANIA CLINCHER 
NEW FLAT TREAD TYPE 
MOTORCYCLE TIRE 

Their heavy tread of highly resilient, tough new rubber reduces 
to practically nothing the constant shaking and jumping so gener- 
ally experienced in cycle motoring. Their slightly higher cost 
is quickly made up by longer service — to say nothing of saving 
wear and tear on the machine. And they enable the cycle motorist 
to drive twice as far with less fatigue. 

It's worth your while to write for descriptive booklet, price list 
and names of dealers near you. 

PENNSYLVANIA RUBBER CO., JEANNETTE, PA. 

Branches and Agencies throughout the country. 




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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



35 



ftvf 



MAbPfHES* T 



Newark— 264 Halsey St. Detroit— 842 Woodward Ave. BRANCHES. Boston — 292 Devonshire St. Chicago — 20 La Salle St 
Chicago — 1 30 1 Michigan Ave. New York — 73d St. & Broadway. New York— 148 Chambers St 

AGENCIES, 
Atlanta, Ga., Dunham Rubber Co.; Atlantic City, N. J., Penn Auto Supply Co.; Boise, Idaho, Randall Dodd Auto Co.; Buffalo, 
N. Y., Empire Sales Co.; Cleveland, O., Motor Supply Agency Co.; Denver, Col., Denver Auto Goads Co.; Dallas, Tex., Muncer 
Auto Co.; Jacksonville, Fla., Savell Rubber Co.; Los Angeles, Ca!., Empire Tire and Rubber Co.; Minneapolis, Minn., Empire 
Tire and Rubber Co.; New Orleans, La., H. A. Testard; Norfolk, Va., Wm. H. Grover; Philadelphia, Pa., Penn Auto Supplv Co.; 
Pittsburg, Pa^ Consumers' Auto Supply Co.; Portland. Me., James Bailey Co.; Providence, R. I., Waite Auto Supply Co.: St. 
Louis, Mo.. Gorman Bros.; Savannah Ga., Harris Tire Co.; Syracuse, N. Y., Central City Rubber Co.; Toledo, Ohio, W. G. 
Nagel Electric Co.; Auto Specialty Co., Kansas City, Mo. 




THE 




/VIOTORCYCLE 
SEARCHLIGHTS 

Mangln Lease Reflectors 
Split Front Glass. 






Lamp 
No. 102 
Bracket 
No. 14% 



arate Generator 



FIRST IN STYLE AND QUALITY AND FIRST IN THE HEARTS 

OF THE MOTORCYCLISTS 

Send for Complete List, Lamp Bracket Attachments, each and all Motorcycles 

Automobile and Boat Lamps (c»tX°Q 20th Century Mfg. Co. KJjSR& 



Have You Noticed ? 

That most of the Two, 
Three and Four Cylinder 
Machines are equipped with 
Mesinger Cavalry Type 
Motor Saddles, because 
they have the Right Shape 
for Comfort and have Fi- 
bre Friction Shock Absorb- 
ers. 

The Mesinger Cavalry 
Saddle is made like a horse 
saddle— it prevents you 
from flipping and avoids 
that crampish hold of the 
hands on the handle-bars. 




Agents and Riders 

Investigate the Mesinger 
Fibre Friction Shock Ab- 
sorbers, which check the 
Rebound and prevent the 
Sides way. 

Consider: If you insist 
you can have the Mesinger 
Cavalry or Standard speci- 
fied as equipment without 
extra charge. 

There is little difference 
in the price, but a large dif- 
ference in Comfort. 

Atk for Our New Illustrated 
Catalogue. 

H. & F. MESINGER MFG. COMPANY, 1801-1803 Fir.t Avenue, New York 



'CAVALRY" No. 3 

(PATENTED.) 



"One Minute" fire Levers 



remove the most stubborn tire in a jiffy. Won't pinch the inner tube. Operated 

with one hand and held in place by hook shown. 

Price 25 cents per set of three. Weight 1% ozs. 

MAIL A QUARTER OR STAMPS TODAY. WE PAY POSTAGE 



SEE THIS HOOK?JT^ 
IT CATCHES THE SPOKE. 



t 



OYINGTON MOTOR COMPANY, 



2232 Broadway, New York 




IT IS TIME TO EQUIP 

your motorcycle with a Speedometer or a 
combination Speedometer-Odometer. 

When you do, get a good one. 

The STANDARD is guaranteed to be and 
to remain both accurate and steady even 
on rough roads, and it is a good looker. 

Strong Cast Fittings for 
Every Make of Machine. 



STANDARD SPEEDOMETER 
Price $15.00 



PARKER MFG. 

6 Clifton Street, 



COMPANY 

BOSTON 




SPEEDOMETER-ODOMETER 
Price $20.00 



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36 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 15, 1909. 



THE 




IS ALL WAYS THERE 




^wss 



B% H, F. Single Cyl. Standard Touring Model, 

NO matter what use or conditions 
you desire your motorcycle for; 
no matter what particular feature you 
desire evidenced, you'll always find 
the N. S. U. to so fill that requirement 
as to leave no doubt in your mind 
when we say N. S. U. means 

The World's Best 



It holds this title because no matter what 
test the N. S. U. has been put to, it al- 
ways behaves in a manner incomparable. 

As for speed ! 

Have you watched the N. S. U. on the track ? 

TO-DAY THE N.S.U. HOLDS 
26 WORLD'S RECORDS 

While the one mile record still remains untouched. 

1 Mile, 46% sec. 

Made by an amateur, but the best of professionals can't equal it. 

If you want the best by teat, it's the N. S. U. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE "M" 

N* S. U. Motor Company 

206 West 76th St., NEW YORK CITY 




GENERATORS 



are "service" generators. They hold carbide 
enough to supply a i ft. tip all night, or a i ft. 
tip for five hours* The gas supply is steady 
and evenly regulated all the time. The car- 
bide cup automatically sifts the used carbide to 
the bottom — there is no 
waste. If you ride at night 
you need this "service" — 
you need A SOLAR. 

The Badger Brass 
Manufacturing Co. 

Two Factor!..: 

Kenosha, Wis. 

437 Eleventh Avenue 

New York 





Spark Plugs 



MORE 
THAN 
ORDINARY 



SPARK IN WATER 

Sure proof of their infalli- 
bility and of their difference 
from the ordinary. Attention is 
given to every detail of their 
manufacture. Perfection assured. 

The porcelain used in their 
manufacture is of a special heat- 
proof composition. No breakage. 
Assured ignition. 

Simple and unique in construc- 
tion, but does all required, never 
missing and no cleaning neces- 
sary. Saves your battery and 
coil. What more? 

Made in Porcelain 
and mica backs 

Send for Booklet 
"Something about a Spark Plug" 

JEFFERY DEW1TT COMPANY 

230 HIGH STREET, NEWARK, N.J. 

S. & F. Stephenson, Agents for United Kingdom, to Can- 
ning PL, Liverpool, Eng. 
Armand Frey & Co., Agents for Continental Europe — Berlin. 
Germany. 




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July 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



37 



'Tuifiuk 

TRIP CYCLOMETER 

FOR MOTORCYCLES 




"It's nice to know 
how far yon go," 

It also tells 
just what you 
ought to know 
regarding tires, 
batteries, gaso- 
line consumption, etc. 



ACCURATE, RELIABLE 
DURABLE 
Send for Cyclometer Cata- 
logue 




Price* each 



Motorcycle 

Striker 

25 Cents 

Extra 



$2 oo The Veeder Mfg. Co. , 

42 Sargeant St., Hartford, Conn. 

Manufacturers of Cyclometers, Odometers, Tachometers, Tachodo- 

meter Counters and Fine Castings. - 

Represented in Great Britain by Messrs. Markt & Co., Ltd.. 

6 City Road, Finsbury Square, London, E. C, England. 



MOTORCYCLISTS, TAKE NOTICE 

Let k be known that Har ley- Davidson Quality has 
proven its worth to the most discriminating of buyers. 




Winner of Diamond Medal for Endurance and Cup 
for Economy at F. A. M. National Meet, N.Y. 

^PEED ARE THE PASSWORDS 

SATISFACTION 

Are you one of us ? 

K your territory is not taken, write. 

Harley - Davidson Motor Co. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



PFANSTIEHL COILS 

FOR MOTORCYCLES 




ARE 

Guaranteed Absolutely 
for 5 Years 

Our patented system of Pancake winding explains 
this, and also the wonderful efficiency of all Pfanstiehl 
Coils. 

Three reasons for our great popularity: 

INDESTRUCTIBILITY 

RELIABILITY 

PRICE 



Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory 

NORTH CHICAGO. ILL. 



The Main Reason 

for the high quality of 

Splitdorf Ignition 



WILL OUTLAST YOUR MOTOR 



is long, practical ex- 
perience in its manu- 
facture and a constant 
effort to improve. 
The SPLITDORF 
Motorcycle Plug is 
made expressly (or 
Motorcycle Work 
and has no equal (or 
this purpose. 

Insist on it. 



C F. SPLITDORF 

Walton Ave. and 138th St. 

Branch, 1679 Broadway 

NEW YORK 




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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 15, 1909. 




Grinnell Auto Gloves 

ore mode ol "Relndeere" and Collskin 
-the softest and most serviceable of 
glove feathers. They are 

VENTILATED 

by rows of tiny holes across the back, 
too small to admit dust. The gauntlet Is 
kept from sagging by the patented 

"RIST-FIT" 

— a"V" of soft leather set into the cuff, which allows a 

nun, comfortable fit at the wrist. 

ATTl..\TIOJY. IrkiLEKS , No other Auto Clove is made so 
wHl or possesses the superior features of the Grionell 
Glove. No glove is so widely known. Your customers 
want them. If you are not handling rhem, write us for 
prices and terms. 

MORRISON-RICKER MFG. CO. 

27 Broad St.. Grinnell, low* 

Originators and Patentees of 
'Ventilated" and "Rut-Fit** Gloves 



CLEMENT 



-\ 



Attached with ease to any Bicycle, 
making a complete motorcycle, or to any 
rowboat or canoe— or to furnish power for 
any stationary machine. Complete and 
guaranteed for $30.00. Write for de- 
scriptive catalogue 

CLEMENT MOTOR EQUIPMENT CO. 

1900 BROADWAY 

v MOTORS 



GUARANTEED 
MOTORCYCLE 
ACCESSORIES 



Our slock is the largest in America. We have all the 
old standbys and 100 new ones you should know 
about. Send to-day for our money saving 36 page 
catalog and free copy of a new magazine. 

MOTORCYCLE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, Hammondsport, N. Y. 




LET THE MOTOR DO THE WORK 

A MOTORCYCLE can be made quickly PROM ANY BICYCLE bj 
using our 2 H. P. Motor Outfit. Unequalled for POWER, SPEED 
and RELIABILITY. Anyone can easily attach our Outfit by follow- 
ing the dtrecttoDS we seed with each Attachment. Best material and 
workmanship. 



FULLY 
GUARANTEED. 

Immediate d e- 
llvery. Send for 
Catalog B. 

smw Mii (•. 

Galeiburg, Eanaaa 





LET THE 




Mead 



DO YOUR SPARKING 

ALL SIZES, ALL STYLES 

TWMag with the Porcelain* #* fl Oaf* 
Guaranteed Net to Crack 9 1 • WW 

EMIL GROSSMAN COMPANY 

232 Weat 58th Street NEW YOU* 



S*nd for Booklmt A#. /. 



\ 



END OF BAR 



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THE GOODRICH 
Rough Rider Grip 

"MADE TO FIT THE HAND" 
Notice the construction and what it affords: 

The extension of the Rubber Grip beyond 
the end of the handle bar prevents vibration. 

The user is protected against Shocks and 
Jars. 

The corrugations absolutely prevent the 
hand slipping.. 

A fabric reinforcement prevents breaking. 

Length of Grip 8 inches 
Standard size (its one inch handle bar 
Price $1.50 per pair ^ 
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 



The B. F. Goodrich Company 

AKRON, OHIO 



NEW EDITION— JUST OUT 

^ CONSTRUCTION, MANAGEMENT AND CARE OF IWft^ES" 

Revised and Enlarged— 60 Paget. 25 Cents 

Contents. — The Motor, Mechanical Valves, Working 
of Valves, General Motor Parts, Twin Cylinder Motors, 
Motor Tips, Removing and Replacing Cylinder, Over- 
heating, Piston Rings, Knocking and Pounding, Timing, 
Weak Springs, Life of Motors, Care of Valves, Lubri- 
cation, Ignition, Ignition Troubles, Trouble Chart, Mag- 
netos, Carburetor, Transmission, Spring Forks, Tires, 
Two Speed, Attachable Outfits, Belt Don'ts, Other 
Dont's, Cause of Breakdowns, Points to Remember. 

MOTOMYCLE PDBUSfllM CO.. 2ff Bnalway. New Yit 



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July 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



39 



NEW ERA AUTO-CYCLE 

Two Speeds, Free Motor, Hand Cranked Motor 




The New Era Gas Engine Company 

22 DALE AVE.. DAYTON. OHIO 



WHIPPLE 



THE MOTORCYCLE MAN 



The best in the world is none too good 
for our customers. Motorcycles and ac- 
cessories at lowest prices. Pierce 4 
cylinder, $350; Indians, nine models, 
$175 to $325. Good second hand, all 
kinds, down to $40. Send for our sun- 
dry catalog. 



WHIPPLE 



THE MOTORCYCLE MAN 

260 W. Jackson bivd. CHICAGO 



Reliance Twin, 4-5 H. P. $225 




Tiger Ode Works Co., 



782 8th Ave.. 

Distributors for New York and L. 



Send 
Stomp 

for 
Catalog 

NEW YORK 



MAIL THIS TO-DAY 

EARLE L OVINGTON. 
President F. A. M , 

2232 Broadway, New York. 
Dear Sir: I feel that I ought to be a member of the 
F. A. M. We must have a national organization to 
promote motorcycling and to guard and care for its 
many interests. Please send me particulars. 

(Signed) 

State ___ _ _. . . 

City 

Street - 



INDIAN 

AND 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON 
MOTORCYCLES 

PARTS. SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS 

Send for Largest Motorcycle Accessory Catalogue Ever Issued 

Great Bargains in Second-Hand MOTORCYCLES 

$50 up Twins $150 up 
F. B. WIDMAYER CO. 

2312 Broadway NEW YORK 



Perfect 
fitting, 




HANSEN'S 

AUTO and DRIVING 

GLOVES 



V 



wonderfully soft and pliable 
and wear like iron. 
j£^ Write today for hand- 
^k? some descriptive price- 
list and circular. 

O.C.HANSEN MFG. CO. 

337 East Water Street 
MILWAUKEE 



Tire Troubles? 

USE PERMANIT 




For particulars write or send 
53 cents (or a sample carton 
which is sufficient for a bicycle 
tire. 

BEWABE OF IMITATIONS. 

Guarantee Policy furnished to every 

user of "PERMANIT." 

The Adolf Karl Co. 

(Inc.) 

243 Washington Street 

NEWARK, N. J. 




The Baby "Breeze" 

CARBURETER 

For Motorcycles, made of 
polished aluminum, small parts 
of brass, weighs fourteen 
ounces; small in size, big in re- 
sults; price ten dollars. Dur- 
able, light and strong — a hand- 
ful only — special connections for 
popular machines included in 
price; 80 to 95 miles per gallon 
under normal road conditions. 
Write for special literature 
Send ten cents for our Engine 
Trouble Text-book. 



One-hall Actual Size 



Breeze Carbureter Company 

266 HaUey St. Newark, N. J. 



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40 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



July 15, 1909. 



REAL 

Satisfaction 

c n be had only when your motor- 
cycle is equipped with the best 
transmission, therefore please con- 
sider 

3 Safe Bets 




Shamrock Gloria 
Rubber Belt 

Recognized to be the ONLY 
Rubber Belt in the world to five 
satisfaction and do away with 
power wastage. 
Sent by express as follows : 
1 1 in., $8.50 tin., $6.25 
1 in., 7.00 } in* 4.75 

N.S. U.Beit Link 




Like others in looks alone, but not 
equalled in workmanship, material 
or wearing quality. 
The original sent by mail 
| in., 30c. All other sizes, 40c. 

THEN REMEMBER 

your belt can't give entire satis- 
faction unless you use the 

N. S. U. Belt Punch 

It does not cut, it does not ruin your 

belt, it's necessary in your tool kit 

By mail, 70c. 

Write for Booklet "M" if you 
ride a motorcycle; we've 
something for yon. 

N. S. U. Motor Company 

*•* West 76th Street. M«w T«rll City 



MAJESTICALITIES 

MAJ ESTTC~\^ 

^TUBULAR. RaGGAOL CARRIER, 
WITH THRICE HEAVY STRAPS 




Price* express paid S3. 75 

Is made «>f Shelby Steel Seamless Tube 
throughout, with five cokl rolled steel cross 
pieces. The clips are made double with ma- 
chined screws and are nickeled and buffed. 
Is fitted with three heavy leather straps 
with buckles. Is light, yet of the highest 
possible strength, quality and finish and adds 
to the appearance of any machine. Indis- 
pensable to tourists 



MA'JESD 

For 

H 

m 



Price, pottage paid . ... 50 centi 

Holes made In "V" belts with hand punches 
are larger at one end than the other, are 
seldom true, and tear out. Our drill takes 
any size belt up to one Inch and cuts a 
clean, straight hole. It Is made of Aluminum 
and bronxe with drill of first quality sol- 
dered in. 





MAJESTIC STAND 
is the Best on Earth 

Price $3.00 

It Is the only one made holding the frame at 
FOUR points, and preventing the straining 
and twisting of the lower frame tubes. Is 
fitted with heavier legs for 1909, and these 
have triggers at bottom, allowing legs to be 
folded up by the rider's foot. Buy from your 
dealer, or Direct, remitting with order. 

THE MAJESTIC MFG. CO. 

WORCESTER. MASS. 




Order your motorcycle equipped with 

G & J ROUGH-RIDER GRIPS 

Made of Rubber. They relieve the vibration. 
Price. Sl.SO Per Pair 

For Sale by All Dealers. 

G & J TIRE CO. 

INDIANAPOLIS 



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OTORCYCL 



ILLUSTRATED 



nz 



Vol. IV. No. 15 




August 1, 1909 



PUBLISHED BY THE MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 

READY FOR THE F. A. E 

_— _____ 'i ' 

.# - ' 

Hustlers In Charge of Arrangements for Endurance Run, 
Business Meetings, Parade, Speedway Races and Enter- 
tainment Have Made the Most Elaborate Plans In the 
Annals of the Sport In this Country— Program In Detail. 



VI S INDIANAPOLIS and her enthusiastic, progressive 
Jffl J[ host of devotees of the sport are ready for the 
jggg F. A. M. Arrangements for the endurance and 
3SP3BI reliability run, for the business sessions of the 
Federation, for a two-days' series of racing 
events on the Speedway, for the trip to Kokomo, and for 
several other attractive features have been completed. All 
that remains to be supplied are good weather and a large 
attendance of F. A. M. members. The week's programme 
is a most elaborate one. The various committees in charge 
have made nothing less than herculean efforts to insure 
the success of the meet, and indications point unerringly 
to its being the greatest in the history of motorcycling in 
the United States, the following being the week's long list 
of attractions: 

Tuesday and Wednesday, August ioth and nth. — Eighth 
National Endurance and Reliability contest from Cleve- 
land, O., to Indianapolis, Ind. 

Wednesday Evening, 8 P. M. — Reception at the Indiana 
Motorcycle Club Rooms, for visiting members of the 
F. A. M. Light lunch will be handed you and a cool, re- 
freshing draft to slake your thirst. 

Thursday. — 9 A. M., photograph taken at the Circle 
Monument; be sure and bring your motorcycle. 10 A. M., 
run to the principal points of interest in Indianapolis and 
vicinity. 1:30 P. M., motorcycle street parade, to start at 
the Circle Monument. 3 P. M., run to Riverside bathing 
beach. 8 P. M., reception and entertainment at the German 
House. 

Friday, August 13th. — 8:30 A. M., business meeting and 
annual election of F. A. M. officers. This meeting will be 
held in the assembly room of the Board of Trade building. 
2 P. M., races at Motor Speedway: Event No. 1, 5 miles, 
limited to private owners. Event No. 2, 1 mile, F. A. M. 
National Amateur Championship, limited to 61 -inch piston 
displacement. Event No. 3, 3-mile handicap, limited to 
members of the Indiana Motorcycle Club. Event No. 4, 
10 miles, F. A. M. National Amateur Championship, 
limited to 61-inch, piston* displacement. Event No. 5, 
5 miles, for machines not exceeding 55-inch piston dis- 



placement, without auxiliary" exhaust parts. Event No. 6^ 
10-mile professional. Event No. 7, 5-mile handicap, limit 
61-inch piston displacement. Event No. 8, 25 miles, open 
to machines not exceeding 3054 cubic inches. 8 P. M. t 
entertainment at the Avondale Garden. 

Saturday, August 14th. — 9 A. M., business meeting in the 
assembly room of the Board of Trade building. 2 P. M., 
races at Motor Speedway: Event No. 1, 2Y2 miles, limited 
to private owners. Event No. 2, 5-mile National Amateur 
Championship, limited to 61-inch piston displacement. 
Event No. 3, i-mile trials— flying start — limited to ma- 
chines of 61-inch piston displacement. Event No. 4, 10- 
mile amateur handicap, limited to machines of 61-inch 
piston displacement. Event No. 5, 5-mile professional, 
limited to machines of 61-inch piston displacement. Event 
No. 6, 10 miles, open to machines not exceeding 30.50-inch 
piston displacement. Event No. 7, 1 hour, F. A. M. Na- 
tional Amateur Championship, limited to machines of 61- 
inch piston displacement. 

Three prizes will be awarded in each event; those for 
the championships will be medals struck from the official 
F. A. M. die. The cash awards in the professional events 
will be $50, $30 and $20. The entry fee is $1 for each 
amateur event; $2 for each professional event. H. A. 
Githens, Box 126, Indianapolis, who is chairman of the race 
committee, is receiving the entries. 

The following is a synopsis of the rules governing the 
endurance and reliability contest: 

Entries will be restricted to amateurs riding motorcycles 
the engines of which have a total piston displacement not 
exceeding 61 cubic inches, and which are not provided with 
auxiliary exhaust ports, machines to be provided with 
efficient mufflers and full road equipment, which must con- 
form in every respect to catalogue specifications. 

The entry fete is $5.00 and must accompany entry blank. 
The entry list will be closed August 5th with the delivery 
of the first mail to the chairman, G. H. Hamilton, Box 126, 
Indianapolis, Ind. Post entries will cost $7.50. 

Competitors will be classified as follows: Class A, 
private owners; Class 1 A, private owners riding single 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



cylinder motorcycles; Class 2 A, private owners riding 
multicylinder motorcycles; Class B, amateurs engaged in 
the trade; Class 1 B, riders engaged in the trade using 
single cylinder motorcycles; Class 2 B, riders engaged in 
the trade using multicylinder motorcycles. 

Contestants must report at Cleveland, Ohio, with their 
machines, to the committee or its representatives on or 
before 10 A. M., Monday, August 9th, in order that num- 
bers and schedules may be delivered and their machines 
inspected and marked for identification. The schedules 
will name the chief points en route, progressive distances 
and the time at which each respective competitor is due at 
controls and checking stations, and also the grade on 
which the hill-climbing tests will occur. The start of the 
contest will be made from in front of the Hollenden Hotel, 
Cleveland, Ohio, at 6 A. M., Tuesday, August 10th. Com- 
petitors will be despatched in batches of four at one 
minute intervals and in the order of their numbering. No 



checking stations, but may check in upon arrival and de- 
part immediately. The running schedule provides a de- 
lay of one-half hour at noon day controls, but contestants 
arriving over one-half hour late at these points will be 
checked out immediately on entering. Contestants will 
not be checked in at controls until the time of arrival 
specified on their cards. Contestants must not come 
closer to control than one city block until checking time. 
After being checked in at noon and night controls, con- 
testants must deliver their machines to the committee in 
charge, to be held until the contestants leave the control. 
The running schedule and arrivals at checking stations 
and controls is to be based on an average rate of speed of 
15 miles per hour from Cleveland to Coshocton; 17 miles 
per hour from Coshocton to Columbus, and 19 miles per 
hour from Columbus to Indianapolis. A five-minute allow- 
ance, fast or slow, will be allowed for variation of watches. 
In event of disagreement, Western Union time will be ac- 



Route of the En- 
durance Run. 




allowance will be made for failure to start at the time 
specified on the schedules. 

The route of the contest on the first day will be from 
Cleveland, Ohio, to Columbus, Ohio, via Wooster, Coshoc- 
ton and Newark, a distance of 173.7 miles. The second 
day's run will be from Columbus, Ohio, to Indianapolis, 
Indiana, via Springfield and Dayton, Ohio, Richmond, 
Liberty, Connersville and Rushville, Indiana, a distance of 
188.3 miles as per schedules provided. 

Each competitor in each class and subdivision thereof 
shall be given an initial credit of 1,000 points, and shall be 
subject to the penalizations hereinafter enumerated. 

Noon controls, denoted by blue flags, will be established 
at Coshocton, Ohio, on the first day's run, and Richmond, 
Ind., on the second day's run. Checking stations, denoted 
by white flags, will be established at Wooster and Newark, 
Ohio, on the first day's run, and at Dayton, Ohio, and 
Liberty, Ind., on the second day's run. 

At checking stations each contestant must dismount and 
sign his name to the checking sheet, to show that he has 
conformed to the route. Contestants will not be held at 



cepted. It is advised that all contestants, before starting 
and at noon-day controls, if possible, verify their watches with 
Western Union time. 

One hundred yards in advance of the foot of the grade 
selected for the hill climb, a banner will be suspended 
across the road, reading "Hill Climb," and 50 yards in 
advance of this banner a flagman will be stationed. Con- 
testants will be started at flagman 150 yards in advance of 
the foot of the hill and penalties will only be reckoned 
after contestant passes the banner indicating Hill Climb, 
which shall be located 100 yards from foot of hill. The 
exact point for the hill climb will be indicated on the run- 
ning schedule. 

The technical committee will seal the contestant's ma- 
chines with such seals as they may select, these seals to 
cover battery boxes, magnetos and cylinders. Any seals 
broken during the first day's run will be resealed at the 
night control at Columbus, Ohio. 

Under penalty of disqualification, no complete replace- 
ment of motors, carbureters, mufflers, magnetos, timers, 
tanks or wheels will be permitted, and no change of 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



t 



The Kokomo Factory. 



sprockets or pulleys, save in case of accident, pro- 
viding the replacement is not to be such as to 
reduce or increase the gear. (These parts will 
be sealed.) 

Gold medals will be awarded for perfect scores 
in each Class A and B. Silver medals will be 
awarded to riders in each class finishing with a 
score of not less than 900 points. Bronze medals 
will be awarded to riders finishing within two 
hours of time scheduled on each day. Each con- 
testant must pay for the storage of machines in 
controls and for all gasoline, oil or supplies ob- 
tained at the start or en route. Any question as 
to the correct interpretation of the rules will be left 
to the judgment of the contest committee, whose 
decision shall be final. 

The speed laws in States of Ohio and Indiana are as 
follows: In thickly populated districts of cities and towns 
speed should not exceed 8 miles per hour. In less thickly 
populated urban districts, 15 miles per hour. In open 
country, 20 miles per hour, with due regard to rights of 
others on the road. Contestants are warned to be particu- 
larly careful in passing through small towns, as the ma- 
jority of these strictly enforce the speed ordinance. In 
order to follow the mileage shown on the running schedule 
contestants are requested to set their speedometers at 
checking stations and controls in accordance therewith. 

The entertainment committee, of which G. H. Westing 
is chairman, has scheduled, for Wednesday evening, an 
informal reception at the Indiana Club's headquarters. 
Thursday morning, visiting riders will have an opportunity 
to tour the city and surrounding places of interest. On 
Friday evening there will be a band concert, with refresh- 
ments and entertainment. Automobile rides for the lady 
visitors will be in order Friday morning, and on Friday 
evening a smoker, vaudeville entertainment, athletic con- 
test and a light supper will be provided. Saturday evening 
will be a sort of free-for-all. 

The start of the Kokomo run will be made from 
the Dennison Hotel, at 9:30, Thursday morning, August 
12th. The distance to Kokomo is 52 miles, and all who 
make the run will be the guests of the Kokomo Rubber 
Company, at luncheon, at the Country Club ^^" A 
handsome souvenir will be given to all participants, 
who will also have an opportunity to visit the factory. 





ar- 

L. 
M. 



Souvenir 
Badge. 



The Kokomo Country Club. 

The officers of the Indiana Motorcycle Club 
are Chas. Wyatt, president; H. L. Dipple, vice- 
president; Harry Graff, treasurer; Robert Sturn, 
secretary; L. M. Wainwright, G. H. Hamilton 
and F. I. Willis, directors. 

The various committees in charge of the 

rangements for the meet are thus constituted: 

Executive — Chas. Wyatt, chairman; H. 

Dipple, Harry Graff, Robert H. Sturn, L. 

Wainwright, G. H. Hamilton and F. I. Willis. 

Finance — Gus Habich, chairman; F. I. Willis 
and George C. Detch. 

Press — G. W. Stephens, chairman; F. O. Minter. 
Programme — H. A. Githens, chairman; Frank 
B. Willis and Lee Chapman. 
Entertainmentr— G. H. Westing, chairman, Harry Graff 
and John McGarver. 

Prizes— W. D. Dean, chairman; C. E. Ball and P. C. 
Hudson. 

The official F. A. M. hotel will be the Dennison, corner 
of Pennsylvania and Ohio streets. Rooms will be reserved 
and special rates accorded to all F. A. M. members. Show 
your membership card to the clerk and he'll fix you up right. 
The Indiana Motorcycle Club Rooms, 444 West Ver- 
mont street, will be the official place of registration. All 
F. A. M. members are requested to sign the official register 
and receive the souvenir badge. # 

There will be application blanks at the Indiana Motor- 
cycle Club Rooms for all who desire to join the Federa- 
tion. All applicants who are accepted will be provided 
with membership badges entitling them to the privileges 
of the meet. Ample provision has been made for the stor- 
age of machines. 

Plans are being made by President C. H. Lang, of the 
Chicago club, to have a run of members and their friends 
to Indianapolis to attend the convention. President Lang 
expects to have a good representation of Chicago en- 
thusiasts at the Indianapolis conclave. 

E. S. Hilton, New York manager of the Morgan & 
Wright Tire Co., and John B. Tower, New York City 
salesman for the same concern, will go to Cleveland in 
time to accompany the endurance riders from Cleveland to 
Indianapolis. They will look out for tire troubles on 
the run. The G & J and Kokomo companies will 
also be represented in this manner. 




Bird's-Eye-View of Indianapolis — Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument in the Centre. 



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The Chairmen of Four F. A. M. Meet Committees 




Charles Wyatt, Executive Committee. 




G. H. Hamilton, Racing Committee. 




G. W. Stephens, Press Committee. 



G. H. Westing, Entertainment Committee. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



##> 


FEDERATION SUGGESTIONS 

BY F. P. PRIAL. 


## 




1 HE F. A. M. is growing, growing fast ; 
has thrown away its teething ring. 
It no longer cries for the things that 
babies cry for, but it is howling 
for "pants." The recent blare of 
trumpets, the turning of the calcium 
on the F. A. M. has quickened and 
vitalized the organization. It had 
long been swathed and veiled in a 
strange and ominous quietude. It had become static; 
putrefaction might easily have set in. Motorcycle 
Illustrated had long noted this dead-level monotony, 
and in a hyper-vital and enthusiastic moment it tore aside the 
veil and exposed the F. A. M. as it was. Some regarded 
this as a sacrilege; decried our penetrating the holy of 
holies. They said that publicity, that discussion would 
hurt, injure, destroy the F. A. M. They said that the work 
of a decade would be undone, etc., etc. As we expected, 
just the opposite was the result. Our blast was nobly 
echoed by the other paper. In fact, an issue arose, hav- 
ing more or less the aspect of a "scrap," and all the world 
knows what a good thing an honest "scrap" is. It stirs 
things up. It eliminates hibernation. It quickens the dead 
and the dead ones. What the world perhaps needs most 
to-day is a terrific war; not a comic opera war between two 
tenth-rate powers, but a fearful crash between two na- 
tions of the first class. Pray, lovers of peace, do not 
stop your "subs" because of the above sentiment. The 
world is sunk in the sloth and weakness that shadow 
wealth. A good fight would set us all up. R. G. himself 
will agree with this; for he's been a soldier, and he knows. 

Jl Jl 

Within the month the hard-working secretary of the 
F. A. M. has sent to the hard-working treasurer of the 
F. A. M. a sum approximating $1,200, cold cash. The 
strong box already held some $400, so that, at the moment, 
the national exchequer has about $1,700 in cold, usable coin. 
A month ago the organization was painfully and anxiously 
poor. But to-day, comparatively speaking, the F. A. M. 
is rich. Great is Allah! 

Jl Jl 

The slogan for the F. A. M. should be: NINETEEN 
HUNDRED AND TEN, TEN THOUSAND MEMBERS 
or nothing. It is the simplest thing in the world to 
reach this figure. The fellows are there; all they 
are waiting for is a friendly handshake and a request to 
join the Federation. The way to accomplish this result is 
to give more money to the national treasury and less to 
the district. The present division of income is unwise from 
many points of view. The national organization should 
keep on hand a fixed balance of $1,500. But, for the next 
twelve months, it should spend every dollar it receives in 
building up the membership. The districts themselves 
should spend half of their present surpluses, and one-half 
of every dollar they receive in doing similar work. The 
net result would be sure to be grand. There should be a 
brainy chairman of the membership committee, a man with 
talent and time to plan ways and means for extending the 
membership. This chairman should scheme out the work, 
but the actual detail should be done in the secretary's 
office. The secretary should receive a modest honorarium, 
just enough to pay for personal wear or tear, say about 
$200 or $300 per year. But he should be empowered to 
open an office and hire a stenographer to do the actual 
work. This plan is the only plan; it will pay. 



From time to time the list of new members should be 
published; also the total number of members in each State. 
This creates rivalry. In the palmy days of the League of 
American Wheelmen, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsyl- 
vania and, we think, Illinois had a battle royal to see which 
State among them would have the largest number of mem- 
bers. The official totals were published from week to 
week. One time, one State would lead, the next time an- 
other. The contest finally got hotter than any prize 
beauty competition and the memberships were poured in 
by the hundred. In that way, through State rivalry, the 
L. A. W. achieved a membership of 30,000, or was it 60,000 
or 100,000. We forget the exact figures; it was so long 
ago. But at any rate the result was simply tremendous. 
Jl Jl 

The office of secretary should be filled by a man from 
some central city, not necessarily a large city. Rather 
a clever, hard-working talented man from Keokuk than an 
ornament and laggard from Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, or 
elsewhere. In any event the man and his office should be 
located in U. S. central. 

Jl Jl 

The secretary should not be a trade man, nor should 
the president or any member of a national committee. 
That creates trade jealousy. It has worked badly in the 
past. Beside that, in this growing trade the majority are 
hard workers and have little or no time for gratuitous 
work; and in organization work it is the man with plenty 
of time who counts. So bar all trade men from the chief 
offices. It is true that, at the present time, the trade is the 
backbone, the spinal column, the brain and the pocketbook 
of motorcycling; but it can well afford to stand back and 
let non-trade men work the F. A. M. 
Jl Jl 

Also the federation should have a head in each State. 
The L* A. W. called him Chief Counsel, and the office was 
often held by men of much talent and great dignity. Such 
a system creates a center of activity in each State, affords 
a local rallying point, stimulates local pride, etc. It is 
hardly necessary to point out the value of .such a plan. 
The F. A. M. should adopt this scheme or something like 
it. The F. A. M. should be incorporated. At present each 
member is liable for any or all of its debts. Enough said. 
It should also bond its secretary and its treasurer. It 
should, at Indianapolis, create a special committee to plan 
a new constitution fitting present needs and embracing 
future possibilities; and, instead of waiting a whole year to 
operate this constitution, the matter should be submitted 
to a mail vote, and it should be in working order two 
months after the Indianapolis meeting. 
Jl Jl 

A new set of competition rules will be submitted to the 
members. They were not conceived in the dark, as has 
been stated. They are the result of hard work, impartial 
thought The statement that they represent any one in- 
terest is poppycock. They are not perfect; nothing is. 
They will be broken; everything is. For human nature is 
frail, especially frail when money talks. But the rules to 
be submitted are an advance on the present plan. And all 
reasonable men are satisfied to go forward step by step. 
For that is the only way to advance with absolute safety. 
Man himself was not made in a day, or in a trillion days. 
Jl Jl 

These are a few rough ideas, thrown hastily into print and 
respectfully submitted to the members. We hope that they will 
be taken up at the Indianapolis Meet and discussed, at least. 



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FRED HUYCK. 


CHARLIE BALKE. 




GRAVES, MITCHELL 


, AND 


WARD. 








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THE 

LEADING 

RECORD 

HOLDERS 

1909 




WALTER GOERKE. 




JAKE" DE ROSIER 




EDDIE LINGENFELDER. 



ROBERT STUBBS. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



RODE 320 MILES IN ELEVEN HOURS 



LOS ANGELES, Cal.— Paul J. C Derkum, better known 
here as "Dare-Devil" Derkum, went out last Tuesday 
to beat the round trip record between Los Angeles and 
San Diego, which was held by Howard Shafer at 16 hours 
and 40 minutes elapsed time. Derkum left the club house 
of the Los Angeles Motorcycle Club at 3:50:30 in the 
morning. C W. Risden, the Indian agent, and C. F. Gates 
followed the record-breaker out into the country on an 
automobile, but Derkum was too fast for them. Captain 
B runner and Walter Collins, who had waited all night at 
the club house to see the "Dare-Devil" start, sought sleep 
as soon as Derkum was out of hearing. 

The first thirty miles to Anaheim were made in an hour 
. and seven and one-half minutes. Frank Loge, one of the 
official timers at the Coliseum, scored Derkum here, where 
he spent four minutes looking over his machine and taking 
on supplies. Capistrano Mission, 62^ miles out from Los 
Angeles, was reached in a half minute less than two hours, 
the best previous record by automobile over this route 
having been two hours, made by a Packard runabout Here 
Paul stopped long enough to put in what gasoline his tank 
would hold, for the next thirty miles is across a big cattle 
ranch, with two ranges of mountains. A few miles below 
San Juan Capistrano, where the road parallels the ocean, 
Derkum tried to ride the beach sands but found the un- 
usual low tide had washed the beach into wrinkles and 
torn up the surface. The trip away from the road and back 
again cost the rider 42 minutes. 

Through the great Santa Margarita rancho, which is as 
large as Rhode Island, thousands of cattle were sleeping 
along the road, causing much delay and forcing Derkum 



to ride around the bovines, or stop until they had vacated 
the right of way. 

At Oceanside, 100 miles out, which was reached at 7:3011 
Derkum made another stop to take on supplies and look 
over his machine, for Derkum is a railroad engineer and 
fireman and believes in taking precaution. Besides, the 
next lap was 40 miles without a stop, until San Diego was 
reached, the turning point of the journey. The last forty 
miles into San Diego were made in less than an hour, count* 
ing the time lost at Oceanside, although there is the mountain* 
at Sorrento, two and one-quarter miles long, part of the 
grade of which is above 12%. There is also the hill at Del 
Mar, with plenty of sand and a series of lagoons to go around. 
With a bicycle this was always a day's trip. When Der- 
kum came into San Diego and registered at the office of the 
Morning Union he showed that the 140 miles had been* 
covered in a half-minute less than 4 hours and 40 minutes, 
only eight minutes slower than the much coveted automo- 
bile record. 

The return journey, up the interior of the State, is 180 
miles, with nearly 100 miles of it in the mountains, some 
of the grades being four or five miles long. That Derkum 
should have covered this 180 miles in 6 hours and 20 min- 
utes is nothing short of marvelous, for this is as fast, if 
not faster, than the most powerful automobiles make it. 
Over this same route the schedule of the Motorcycle Club 
endurance run, May 31, was eleven hours, and only six 
made it inside of schedule. 

The total time for the 320-mile run is a half-minute under 
eleven hours, a record that will be hard to beat And yet at 
the end of the journey Derkum seemed as fresh as ever. 



HOW TO PRESENT A RESPECTABLE APPEARANCE WHEN TRAVELLING AWHEEL. 



IT is generally known that many riders present quite an 
awe-inspiring appearance when clothed for motorcycling. 
It seems that many think that anything will do. Yet, a 
neat costume not only smartens the rider's appearance but, 
in addition to this, is comfortable and specially adapted 
for resisting the dust. We often see a rider careening 
along with a gaily-flapping pair of "college-cut" pants, 
which pick up all the available real estate from the road 
surface, Again, another passes with an attempt to curtail 
the flapping by encasing his legs in a pair of badly-fitting 
gaiters or leggings, which were evidently cut and shaped 
with a hatchet in the backwoods, with the result that they 
"fit where they touch," as the man said to the tailor. 

It is an easy matter to clothe oneself comfortably and 
yet present an appearance unsuggestive of a construction 
camp. "Knicker-breeches" or what tailors call "semi- 
riding," not too dark in color, form the foundation of the ideal 
costume. Add to this a sensible pair of close-fitting leg- 
gings, of calf-leather or pigskin, which are "blocked" or 
shaped to the leg — not the cheap variety with a sewn seam 
down the back. A pair of stout boots, preferably water- 
proof, are also good to look at and to wear. A "Norfolk" 
style, or ordinary thick double-breasted jacket of frieze or 
tweed, and, in summer-time, a linen or pongee dust coat, 
can be worn, also a good dust cap of the same material. 



In boots and gaiters we have a preference for the brown 
lace type, as these seem better than black, and they dp not 
harbor the dirt. The coat and riding breeches should not 
be so dark as to show dust marks, nor so light as to make 
the owner too conspicuous. 

The dust coat, if provided with a high collar, will keep* 
one's ordinary collar free from grime, and a rjder who is 
thus dressed can remove any traces of travel with a few 
whisks of a brush. Again, one may procure linen or 
Holland dust overalls, which will preserve an everyday 
suit, if the rider is off to pay a visit; these slip-on overalls 
of a light drab color are indispensable for such a purpose 
during the dusty season. Gauntlet gloves of light weight 
and of the same material may also be procured, and it is 
an excellent plan to keep an old pair of cape gloves (not 
motoring type) in some handy receptacle on the machine, 
so that if any dirty work is necessary, these may be put on 
to keep the hands respectable. 

We do not wish to impress the reader with any ideas of 
effeminacy or foppishness, but it does not impress anyone, 
to say the very least, if a travel-stained, grimy-handed 
motorcyclist turns up visiting at a house. Nor does it 
enhance the reputation of the sport, not to mention the 
stigma of being classed among the "great unwashed." The 
motorcyclist shouldn't look like a sloven awheel 



THE last semi-monthly club run of the San Francisco 
Club was made to the famous State's prison at San 
Quenten, a large number of the members making this in- 
teresting ride. The return trip was through the famous 
Mill Valley district, one of the most beautiful and inter- 
esting scenic points to be found in the northern part of 
the State. 

Chas. C. Macy, one of the best-known motorcyclists in 
this part of the country, is touring the northern part of 
California. Mr. Macy has ridden more miles than any other 
rider in these parts. 



Owing to the growing prejudice against fast road racing 
in California, C C. Hopkins, the donor of the Jolon cup, 
has withdrawn it from competition until new rules can be 
made for its competition. The cup was originally to be 
given for the rider of any organized club making the 
fastest time between San Francisco and Jolon and return. 

Mr. E. C. Wilson, formerly traveling representative of 
Oilier & Worthington, has severed his connections with 
that concern, and will travel the territory in the interest of 
the Thor line. In Pacific Coast trade circles Mr. Wilson has 
the reputation of a hustler. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 19G9- 



THE IDEAL MOTORCYCLE LAW 

By Dwight Patterson, Chairman of the F. A. M. Legal Committee. 




jOW that many riders are or contemplate 
spending their vacations touring, and 
especially as many motorcyclists are 
to ride from their respective States to 
the annual meet of the Federation of 
American Motorcyclists, the old prob- 
lem of meeting the requirements of the 
laws of the various States visited con- 
fronts us. This raises the question as 
to which statutes are just and reasonable and which the 
contrary; just and reasonable not only so far as the motor- 
cyclists are concerned, but as to other users of our high- 
ways. In other words, we motorcyclists may consider ex- 
ceedingly just the statutes of a State which expressly ex- 
cepts the motorcycle from the provisions of the motor 
vehicle laws; but the public thinks differently, and in those 
States it awaits the chance to enforce regulations of a 
most oppressive character. Several recent examples of 
severe legislation in heretofore comparatively easy-going 
localities stand as proof of this condition. Nowadays, no 
law will remain free from frequent attack upon our statute 
books which does not secure as many privileges to one side as 
to the other. 

.The writer, if he may venture to voice conclusions 
gained after a careful study of the various laws affecting 
the motorcar and motorcycle, would state that no one 
statute contains, on the one hand, or omits, on the other, 
all those conditions which go to make up an ideal law 
regulating the use of the motorcycle. After separating 
the grain from the chaff, however, and after adding a few 
suggestions of his own, he states below what he considers 
to be the provisions which should compose the ideal law. 
In the first place, there should be a provision compelling 
registration and the carrying of some means of identifica- 
tion; not the heavy, cumbersome, three-pound "signs" re- 
quired in some jurisdictions, but simply numbers and let- 
ters painted on the rear mud-guard. Then again, a pro- 
vision should be made for a blanket license to cover all 
machines used by manufacturers or agents. This mud- 
guard numbering in no way adds to the weight, yet affords 
a sufficient means of identification, while no law-abiding 
motorcyclist will raise any objection to this practice. 
Further, such identification may in many instances lead to 
a quick recovery of a stolen machine. The greatest benefit 
to be derived from identification, however, would be the 
means of personally apprehending "the open muffler 
fiends" and other objectionable riders who bring discredit 
upon motorcycling. 

In the second place, the point arises as to whether a 
motorcyclist should be required to pay more than a nomi- 
nal tax. This is a thread-bare controversy, having been 
started by our old friends, the bicyclists, and continued by 
automobilists, with the claim that it is an unjust taxation, 
as it does not impose a tax upon all other vehicles 
making use of the highways. But, inasmuch as there has 
been no direct decision upon this question, be the taxation 
constitutional or unconstitutional, we motorcyclists must 
accept, for the present, the imposition of the tax upon us. 
A reasonably low tax will not be considered objectionable. 
In the third place, there should be a provision permitting 
a duly-registered resident of one State to use the roads of 
another State, provided suitable identification as to the 



home State of the visitor is exhibited. This courtesy 
should not be for all time, the seven days' limit, now pro- 
vided for in the statutes of several States, being quite 
reasonable and just. 

No doubt many believe that this courtesy shown to 
visiting motorists by sister States is only a poor substitute 
for a uniform Federal law. The answer to this is that the 
likelihood of there being a Federal enactment as to auto- 
mobilists is very, very remote, owing to the difficulty 
which would attach to its enforcement. Further, there is 
opposition by the States, on the ground that while the ex- 
pense of constructing and repairing roads falls on them, 
the revenues would go to the government. Then again, 
do the advocates of the Federal law consider the fact that 
offenders against the Federal law must be prosecuted by 
Federal authorities? 

In the fourth place, there should be provisions regu- 
lating speed. A speed of thirty miles an hour would be 
reasonable in the country, while particular conditions 
should govern the speeds in different built-up localities. 
Then, again, there should be a clause to the effect that no 
greater speed should be attained at any place than is rea- 
sonable and proper, having regard to the traffic conditions 
and use of the highways, or so as not to endanger the life 
or limb of any person, or the safety of any property. It 
would be a wise plan to have as a part of this provision as 
to speeds a requirement that a motorcyclist should stop when 
signalled by persons in charge of restive horses or other 
animals. 

In the fifth place, there should be a provision requiring 
lamps, horns or other means of signalling, and also brakes. 
In many States, at present, there is no differentiation 
made, as to these appurtenances, between the motorcyclist 
and the automobilist, such ridiculous conditions existing 
in some localities that the motorcyclist is compelled to 
use two large lamps "in the front," one red one "in the 
back" and two brakes, not to speak of the "signs" he must 
carry. One white light in front, visible at two hundred 
feet, one modern coaster brake and a horn should be the 
only requirements in this regard, while a provision should 
also be made for an efficient muffler. 

In the sixth place, there should be a different rate of 
fines applying to motorcyclists than applies to automo- 
bilists. It is contrary to the spirit of all fairness that the 
owner of a seventy-five-dollar second-hand motorcycle 
should be fined as much for the infraction of a law, or ordi- 
nance, as the owner of a twelve-thousand-dollar auto- 
mobile. 

Last of all comes the question as to whether a law, if 
such a law should come to pass, should be a separate enact- 
ment, or part of the motor-vehicle law. The writer is 
strongly in favor of the latter, for this reason: It 
would put a stop to the infernal question as to whether 
the motorcycle is a true "motor-vehicle." In other words, 
having the motorcycle classed as a motor-vehicle, but sub- 
ject to different conditions, would prevent over-zealous 
prosecutors from attempting to enforce against motor- 
cyclists the provisions applying to automobilists. To prevent 
this would be a great step forward, since nine-tenths of the 
unjust legislation enforced against motorcyclists in this coun- 
try arises from a mistaken interpretation of the words, "motor- 
vehicle." 



HA. COLLIER won the only motorcycle event on the 
• programme at the opening meet at Brooklands, Eng- 
land, recently. ' The distance was about & l / 2 miles, and the 
winner averaged nearly seventy miles an hour. 



ACCORDING to Motor Cycle, the English publication, 
the heaviest rider in the United Kingdom is W. F. 
Cross, of Sunderland, whose weight is 278 pounds, and 
who is six feet and one inch tall. 



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August 1, 1909, 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



GRAVES ESTABLISHES A NEW 
TWO HUNDRED MILE RECORD 



Amateur Rider Also Smashes De Rosier's 100 Mile 
Figures, and Clips One and Two-fifths From the Mile. 




J. GRAVES, riding at Los Angeles, 
has just succeeded in battering liter- 
ally to pieces 
a whole series 
of records. 
Not satisfied with hav- 
ing reeled off a mile in 
45 2/5. the youthful 
amateur easily man- 
aged to make ribbons of 
De Rosier's wonderful 
figures for the hundred 
miles, and to establish 
a new 2 hour world's 
record. Graves' re- 
markable riding was 
done on Prince's Colis- 
eum on Friday, Satur- 
day and Sunday, the 
i6th, 17th and 18th of 
last month. The com- 
petition in which 
Graves shattered all 
long distance achieve- 
ments of the past was 

the six hours — three days' race — two hours' riding being 
done each day. 

H. Kohl, riding a local make of machine, beat the fast 
field of racing motorists in the first two-hour lap of the 
race, riding into what was then a world's record of 112 
miles 2 laps. Graves, Ward, Baylock and Williams, riding 
powerful racing motors, were distanced by Kohl's Elk 
motor in a plugging contest. 

M. J. Graves made good, however, in the short-distance 
dash, establishing a new mark for a mile against time, 
riding his fast Indian through the distance in 45 2/5 sec- 
onds. The former record was 464/5 seconds, made by 
Graves on the same track several weeks ago. 

A third record was for the one-hour race, Ward riding 
into a new mark of 66 miles on his powerful N.S.U. motor. 
The belt-drive machine was working perfectly, and Ward 
rode his mount well, taking the laps at terrific speed, and 
riding a consistent race mile after mile. 

There were seven entries in the two-hour grind, includ- 
ing Seymor, Graves, Knappe, Kohl, Baylock, Williams and 
Ward. The riders were permitted to change their mounts 
when desired. Kohl surprised the fans by riding a fast 
race from the start, plugging at a regular clip through 
many miles. Graves rode on three Indians and Ward changed 
his mount twice. 

Ward on his N.S.U. and Graves on his Indian rode the 
miles at a terrific rate, and often lapped Kohl, but the 
frequent stops cost the fast riders many precious minutes 
and Kohl always kept his lead. Kohl finished a mile and a 
lap ahead of Ward, who was half a lap to the good of 
Graves. 

At the end of the two-hour ride the score stood: Kohl 
(Elk), 112 miles 2 laps; Ward (N.S.U.). in miles ^ lap; 
Graves (Indian), 11 1 miles; Knappe (Indian), 69 miles 2 
laps; Baylock (Indian) 81 miles 1 lap; Williams (Merkel), 
12 miles 2 laps. _ 



GRAVES* 
RECORDS 

One mile 
45 1 sec. 

100 miles 
1.27:49 

134 1 miles 
in 2 hrs. 




M. J. GRAVES, NEW RECORD HOLDER. 



H. Ward, on his N.S.U., was in the lead at the end of 
the fourth hour. He rode 120 miles and 3 laps during the 
third and fourth hours, making his total for the four hours 
232 miles and 1 lap. 

The pace set Saturday was a little too fast for Kohl, who 
held the lead during the first two hours, and he was ob- 
liged to take second place. He rode 117 miles and 2 laps, 
and only stopped once, at the beginning of the fourth hour, 
for gasoline. Graves' distance for the third and fourth 
hours was 115 miles and 3 laps, and for the four hours 226 
miles and 3 laps. 

Ward set the steadiest pace of all and made each mile 
in a minute almost regularly. Near the end of the first 
hour he and Graves kept nearly together for several miles 
and neither seemed to be able to gain more than a few 
feet. 

The first five miles was made by Graves in 4 minutes 
6H seconds. At the end of the first hour Ward had ridden 
61 miles and 1 lap; Kohl, 60 miles and 1 lap; Graves, 59 
miles and 2 laps, and Knappe, 54 miles. 

It was on the third day, however, that Graves proved his 
superiority. During the first hour's ride he covered 57 
miles, establishing a new world's record for the 60 minutes. 
In the second hour he negotiated 57V2 miles. Graves also 
lowered the world's record for the 100 miles, covering the 
distance in 1 hour, 2^ minutes, 49 seconds, beating Jake 
DeRosier's former record by 11 minutes, 10 seconds. 
Graves rode 361^ miles, or 100 miles farther than the 
winnning car in the automobile race held at Ascot Park, 
May 31. 

A. Ward finished second and made 117 miles, 2j4 laps 
Sunday afternoon and a total of 350 miles for the six 
hours. Kohl was third and Knappe fourth. 
«£• «5* 

Experts differ as to the rate of engine speed which most 
effectually reduces vibration and eliminates road shocks. 



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10 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



THE DELIGHTS OF MOTORCYCLING 

Riding for Pleasure Versus Riding for Speed 
By ALFRED H. BARTSCH 



HOW many of us lead our lives without realiza- 
tion of the beauties of the world. We con- 
tent ourselves with that overpowering am- 
bition to secure position and wealth, and for- 
get that our bodies need relaxation and 
freedom, and our minds diversion and rest, in order 
to counteract the warping influence of business con- 
finement. "All work and no play makes Johnny a dull 
boy," is an axiom which 
I used many times to 
secure a holiday in the 
days of my youth. 
Even to-day, that say- 
ing is one of my best ar- 
guments when my friends 
inquire as to when my 
motorcycle ambition is 
likely to wear away. 

I have bicycled thou- 
sands of miles, I have 
motorcycled far more, 
and yet each trip I take 
brings to light new 
scenes and produces 
new sensations, so that 
to-day I am almost 
tempted to say that, 
with the delights the 
motorcycle offers, my 
craving for week-end 
tours will never be sat- 
isfied. 

I do not believe that 
there is any form of 
pleasure more satisfy- 
ing to those who seek 
to rid themselves of 
cares and worriments 
— whether business or 
social — than motorcy- 
cling. It brings on the 
necessary change of 
scene, takes one into 
the open air, whose ex- 
hilarating rush fills the 
lungs with pure oxygen 
and makes us forget 
our troubles, and that 
at a cost far below the 
real valuation of the 

benefit derived? Can you ask for more than that? 
Should the above be read by any crank of the soli- 
taire table I should not be surprised to receive a com- 
munication to the effect that I am slightly demented, 
that motorcycling at its best is fit for fool-hardy 
juveniles who know not the value of life and limb. 
Such assertions have been made, but generally by 
those who have never ridden or even understood the 
principles of a motorcycle. Yes. I have many times 
seen elderly and conservative business men who, years 
ago, were enthusiastic bicyclists, sniff at the motor- 




ALFRED H. BARTSCH. 



cycle in scorn, but who, after being induced to just 
try, have fluttered back 25 years and are now thor- 
oughly enjoying themselves, able, as they are with- 
out the slightest exertion, to get into close touch with 
nature. 

Of course, whether motorcycling is to be a pleasure 
or not depends considerably on the motorcycle itself 
and the way it is ridden. In conversation with the 

public, we are told 
that we are madmen, 
crazy enthusiasts, crim- 
ials, public nuisances — - 
in fact, is there any 
abuse that has not been 
heaped upon our 
heads? Nevertheless, 
thank goodness, this 
public prejudice is on 
the wane; but we shall 
have to keep on preach- 
ing the gospel, so that 
the bubbling-over en- 
thusiast will not bring 
our uplifting endeavors 
to naught. On the 
other hand, there are 
those who offer these 
objections: "The mo- 
torcycle shakes you up 
so; there's too much 
vibration; its so dirty 
and the strain is bad for 
the nerves." 

Now, if your motor- 
cycle is proportioned 
improperly, is not 
equipped with efficient 
spring forks, or the 
saddle is stiff and rigid, 
or the tires pumped too 
hard, you undoubtedly 
will receive a fairly 
good shaking up, espe- 
cially if you are not 
aware that the proper 
way to ride is to hold 
yourself and bars any 
way but rigid. The 
pulsations of the motor, 
which cause vibration, 
will never reach the rider if the machine is properly 
proportioned and the motor hung correctly; and 
then, too, the inflation of the tires should be done 
with proper regard to one's personal feelings. 

As for the dirt and the nervous strain, they always 
go together. "I take no man's dust," I've often heard 
asserted by a nervous wreck, who never allowed an 
auto or motorcycle to pass him without challenge. He 
bragged of wrecks and narrow escapes by the score, 
and he always returned home dirtv. dustv and almost 
dead. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



11 



These are the boys who are holding the sport back, who 
prevent the more conservative from accepting motor- 
cycling as a real enjoyable pastime. But even they, in 
spite of their foolishness, will not be able to bring real 
disaster upon the sport. 

Motorcycling has come to stay, that's positive. It frees 
you of dependence upon the regular forms of transporta- 
tion. It enables you to be exclusive in the choice of com- 
panions. The fast and heavy twins will go, and in their 
stead we shall see the small, light machines, fitted with 
cushion frames and forks, with free engines and two speed 
gears, and the public in general will be motorcycling as 
thick as bees. "We take no man's dust" will be their 
watchword, but to this they will add, "because we refuse 
to follow it" That sentiment will insure the success of 
motorcycling. 

I enjoy motorcycling simply because, when touring for 
enjoyment, speed is not the important factor. I go as far 
as I please and adapt myself to the conditions as I find 
them, taking as much time as may please my inclination. 
It's the wealth of scenery, the shady nooks and babbling 
brooks, the country dinners at the wayside inn, the after- 
dinner lounge under some inviting oak, that make motor- 



cycling really enjoyable. Not how far or how fast, but 
how pretty the country, should be the point to consider 
when seeking the real worth of motorcycling. My trips 
never exceed 125 miles per day and generally they cover 
60 to 75 miles. My companions seldom exceed four — not 
that I dislike club runs, for I don't, because there is to my 
mind no better sportsmen than a crowd of motorcyclists. 
However, whether riding with four or four hundred com- 
panions, I like the rear position, away back out of the dust, 
where I can watch the passing panorama, listen to the purr 
of my motor and forget business and the world. My pace 
is generally such that I can see both the road ahead and 
the scenery bordering upon it, and when Nature supplies 
an exceptionally beautiful spot, I dismount, smoke my pipe 
and rest. We make a mistake in riding simply to annihi- 
late distance, rather than to break up mental cobwebs; if 
one wishes to tour just to cover milage, he might as well 
ride around a race track and be done with it. Instead, get 
a good, careful companion and a camera, be not bound by 
timetable or itinerary, skip the uninteresting localities with 
common sense bursts of speed, stop when you see some- 
thing worth while and rest by the roadside whenever you 
feel like it. That's real motorcycling. 



ROAD DANGERS- 



-HOW TO AVOID THEM— HORSES AND HOUNDS. 
By Gasolinius. 



BHE vagaries and uncertainties of the horse are well 
known to every experienced rider. I find that riders 
of to-day are far better qualified in this respect than 
were the pioneers, when every "hay motor" took it 
into its head to stand on its hind legs and try to do 
an original buckdance to the tune of horn and muffler. Many 
a time does a knock-kneed specimen of the equine species do 
fool tricks of this Montana type, even in this present en- 
lightened era. A horse to-day is not fit for harness if it has 
not been properly broken to motors, properly trained to the 
sound of even the dulcet cut-out and clarion horn. The horse 
is a beautiful domestic animal with four legs, one at each 
corner, but until it has learned the throttle and spark control 
of said legs, it cannot be an object of admiration. We have 
all met the critter with a long wheel-base and racing style 
of ears on d country by-road. To my intense, callous delight, 
be it said, I find that an important decision has just been 
given in England. A horse owner brought an action for dam- 
ages against a motorist for the value of a horse killed in an 
accident. It appears that a motorist, as in duty bound by law, 
when meeting a horsed outfit, blew his horn, which, we are 
told, so frightened the animal that it fell after a short attempt 
at a Marathon record — and had to be killed because of the 
injuries it had received. The owner thereupon sued the 
motorist for the value of the horse, on the ground that the 
sounding of the horn constituted a public nuisance and caused 
the accident. For sheer impudence this reduces the orchestra 
to a mere whisper, as Shakespeare says! But the learned 
"wise and upright judge" upheld the motorist on the ground 
that "the blowing of a horn or the presence of a motor vehicle 
are not in themselves nuisances, in that both are accepted 
on the king's highway, and that any question of nuisance or 
of consequent damage, through the presence of a motor 
vehicle or the sounding of the aforesaid horn, must depend 
entirely upon the circumstances of the particular case." Good 
for John K. Bull of Pittsburg! 

Still, I would not have liked to have been in that motorist's 
shoes at any period before that decision had been rendered. 
I take it that all that is required of the motorist is to do as 
all reasonably-minded drivers already do, and that is to 
sound the horn only sufficiently to attract the attention of the 
driver or person in charge of the horse. This having been 
done, there is no further need for sounding, and I presume 
that the case of a motorist who, in spite of the fact that the 
attention of the horse-driver had already been attracted, con- 
tinued to blow his horn, although the horse was plainly 
alarmed thereby, would furnish a case where the motorist 



would be liable for any damage which might be caused. We 
must, as a mere matter of road courtesy, take a fair-minded 
view of existing road conditions, where the new and the old 
methods of locomotion prevail. 

One must, in consideration to other road users, and with 
regard to one's own personal safety, exercise care and do 
everything possible to avoid any chance of stigma being at- 
tached to our sport. It is necessary to join the line of traffic 
not only in a main road, but in coming into a main road out 
of a private drive. Many accidents have been caused in such 
situations, and it is well to utter a timely word of warning. 
Often a private drive is hidden from the sidewalk and one 
can hardly blame a pedestrian for not watching all the en- 
trances he is passing. Where there is no sidewalk interven- 
ing between the drive and the roadway, even more caution is 
necessary, since other vehicles, fast and slow, may reasonably 
be expected to be coming along that roadway ; moreover, they 
will be travelling at a much greater speed than the pedestrian 
on the sidewalk. To be suddenly confronted with a car or 
motorcycle shooting out from some obscure driveway can 
hardly be described as restful. 

Did any one say dogs ? I love dogs ; but when on a motor- 
cycle they endow me with some sort of personal magnetism 
which I have seen mentioned in advertisements. It is all right 
when a dog sits on a front-wheel spoke, you being prepared 
for it. Then the dog "kiyies" off the map at 2,500 r.p.m. on a 
brake test. But some dogs know better than this, and they 
can cause a right goodly mix-up, by my halidom (old English 
for carbureter). There is an evil-minded hound near my 
house who has a roving eye and a four-cylinder snort ; he can 
accelerate to full speed in about ten yards and he has an ex- 
perimental nature withal. Sometimes he tries to loop the loop 
in the back belt rim, and occasionally attempts to bite a chunk 
from the cylinder ; but when he has succeeded in wrecking the 
whole caboodle and you leave the machine in the road to 
go and coax him with a twenty-inch pump— he is gone, and 
you return looking as cheap as a stock machine in a hillclimb. 
Occasionally I fill my pockets with rock to catch him by 
subtlety, but he is not to be caught — some fourth sense makes 
him shun me, though when I am unarmed he sticks to me like 
dust to a vaselined registration number. I apologized for 
nearly running over a dog which looked like a second-hand 
bootbrush only a year ago; the owner just looked at me re- 
proachfully out of two 60-oglepower eyes — and I grovelled! 

Oh, brother, by the beard of the Prophet, I conjure you to 
be careful and studiously to avoid the dangers of the horse, 
the hound and the houri ! 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



TWO- VERSUS FOUR-CYCLE ENGINES 

BY S. R. SAINT-HUBERT. 



TlHE question as to the relative merits of the two-cycle 
I and four-cycle motor for service on the two-wheeler 
is an interesting one, and while much has been 
learned about the four-cycle, first from the experi- 
ments of de Dion and Peugeot in France, and sub- 
sequently by various builders in this country and England, 
comparatively little is known about the two-cycle. In fact, 
what is known has been derived from automobile practice, 
where water-cooling is used for the most part and air-cooling 
attempted in only two cases. As the conditions under which 
a motor operates in a motor-car are not analogous to those 
applying to a two-wheeler, except in certain cases, we have 
very little to go by and must work mostly on theory as to 
the suitability of the two-cycle motor to our purposes. 

As many motorcyclists are familiar only with the four-cycle 
motor, a short explanation of the operation of the two-cycle 
engine will not be out of place. In the ordinary type, the 
motor is without valves communicating with the cylinder, 
port? for the admission and exhaustion of the gases being 
located at points near the extreme outward position of the 
piston, so as to be uncovered during the outward stroke. 
Instead of sending the mixture directly into the cylinder, as 
in a four-cylinder motor, the carbureter communicates with 
the crank-case of the motor and the charge is compressed 
therein on the outward stroke of the piston and enters on 
top of the piston through a by-pass at the proper time. Dif- 
ferent from the four-cycle, the four essential operations of 
admission, expansion, firing and exhaustion are performed in 
one revolution of the crank-shaft instead of in two. The 
illustration shows a typical motor of this type, A being the 

port communicating with the 
carbureter, B the crank-case, 
C the by-pass and D and E 
the bafflle-plate and exhaust 
port respectively. 

Since all the essential opera- 
tions occur during a single 
revolution of the crank-shaft, 
every out-stroke of the piston 
is made under the impulse of 
the exploding charge in the 
combustion chamber. The ig- 
nited gas continues to expand, 
driving the piston outward 
until the exhaust port E be- 
gins to be uncovered. Ex- 
haust then follows rapidly 
and is well under way when 
the inlet port at the end of 
the by-pass C is uncovered by 
the outwardly-moving piston. 
At the same time this occurs, 
the mixture is slightly com- 
pressed in the crank-case B 
and, on the opening of the 
inlet port, rushes into the 
combustion space, being de- 
flected upward toward the 
head of the cylinder by a 
baffle-plate D, set in the head 
of the piston. The incoming 
of the mixture and the ex- 
haustion of the burnt gases 
of the last charge continue until the extreme end of the stroke. 
During the next in-stroke, until the* closure of first the inlet 
and then the exhaust port, the mixture continues to flow in 




and the exhaust to make its exit As the piston continues 
its movement, the mixture is compressed and is ready for 
ignition at the completion of the stroke. A screen is usually 
fitted in the by-pass to prevent popping in the crank-case, due 
to part of the fresh mixture being ignited by the burnt gases 
and the flame rushing back through the by-pass. A check 
valve is fitted between the carbureter and the crank-case to 
prevent the compressed mixture from returning to the car- 
bureter. The advantages claimed for the two-cycle motor 
over the four-cycle are: 

A power stroke at every revolution of the crank-shaft for 
each cylinder, with twice the consequent power effect as com- 
pared with the four-cycle. This results in more even torque 
and smoother running. 

Absence of valves communicating with the cylinder, with 
their accompanying push-rods, springs and camshafts. This 
makes for simplicity in construction and operation. 

Less weight for a given horsepower. As the power effect 
of the two-cycle motor is considerably greater than that of 
the four-cycle, a smaller motor of the former type can be 
used in place of the comparatively heavier four-cycle for the 
same horsepower. 

Some of these advantages are only theoretical, and show 
up very badly in practice. For instance, far from having twice 
the consequent power effect of the four, the two-cycle motor 
at its best has never been known to give more than 33^ 
per cent, more power than a four of the same cylinder di- 
mensions. The writer knows of no published tests of two- 
cycle motors in competition with four-cycle motors where the 
makers were willing to have their figures and results ex- 
amined. Neither will two-cycle motors run at the speeds 
necessary for service on the two-wheeler, from 600 to 700 
revolutions per minute being the highest speed at which a 
full charge can be drawn into the combustion space. It is 
obvious that, from the point of view of speed, the two-cycle 
motor is of little use for motorcycle purposes. 

As regards weight: Since a two-cycle motor of 3-inch bore 
by 354-inch stroke will give 1.86 horse power at 800 revolu- 
tions per minute by Roberts' formula,* the standard in motor 

'Robert's formula for horsepower is: 
D« xLxN 
Hp. = for a two-cycle motor, 



Hp. = - 



13.500 
' cLxN 



D« x 



for a four-cycle motor, 



16,000 

when D = bore in inches, L = the length of stroke in inches and 
N = the number of revolutions per minute. For more than one cylinder 
the product is multiplied by the number of cylinders, as 2 for a two- 
cylinder motor. 

practice, it is evident that such a motor will have less weight 
than a four-cycle motor of 354-inch bore by 3%-inch stroke, 
which gives the same power at the same speed. Now, if the 
two-cycle motor could be run at 1,500 revolutions, it would 
be of advantage to use such a motor in preference to a four- 
cycle motor, but such are the limitations of construction and 
the inability to suck in gases, burn them and thoroughly expel 
them, that the motor could only run idle at that speed, and 
would stop as soon as any load was put on it. This has 
been found to be the case in automobile practice, where, at 
1,500 revolutions, the charge drawn in is scarcely one-quarter 
strength of that at around 700. To get the proper speed from 
a motorcycle having a two-cycle motor, it would be neces- 
sary to have a large motor and less reduction to the drive, 
which, of course, means increase in weight over a four-cycle 
motor with regular reduction, which probably would result 
in a short-lived machine. The advantage of lightness in 
weight on the part of the two-cycle is here lost and only 
that of simplicity of parts remains. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



15 



If, however, the charge or mixture can be forced into the 
combustion space by means of a pump or injector, a higher 
speed may be attained. But by doing this weight is intro- 
duced, though probably not as much as the excess due to 
valves, casing, springs, etc., of the four over the two, and 
the simplicity of the two-cycle type is gone. There remains 
the advantage of more regular torque only, and unless some 
device is used to prevent the incoming mixture from going 
out through the exhaust port or to assist the burnt gases 
from the cylinder, the motor will not develop its full power, 
due to that inherent fault in all two-cycle motors, the in- 
ability to clear the chamber of the burnt gases rapidly and 
fully enough. And if such a device is fitted the two-cycle 
is as "complicated" as any four-cycle moter. Even with 
forced charging, speeds of 1,500 revolutions per minute 
are practically impossible. 

Another point with regard to weight is the means of cool- 
ing. If air-cooling is used there will be practically no increase 
in weight of the two over the four-cycle, even though the ribs 
are made longer, as is usually the case. Automobile experi- 
ence has shown that dependence on the natural draught of 
air results in overheated motors, and fans are used wherever 
air-cooling is employed. It is true that the motor on a 
two-wheeler is in a more exposed position than that on a 
truck or car, but it is doubtful whether proper cooling could 
be gotten without a fan, even with the motor in the best 
position. The tendency to overheat on the part of the two- 
cycle motor is due to the frequency of the explosions, one 
per revolution, as against two for the four-cycle. If water 
is used, cooling can be effectively secured, but at the expense 
of weight. In fact for a 3-h.p. motor, the weight of radiator, 
tank, piping, jacket and water will be close on 100 pounds. 
This is no weight to be lightly put on a motor-cycle and, 
while all right for a tri-car or side-car service, has, in the 
opinion of the writer, no place on the two-wheeler. 

Unfortunately, economy is not a strong point with the 
two-cycle motor. Nearly twice as much mixture is burnt 
per minute, while the power is never more than one-third 
greater than that of a four of the same dimensions. The 
rider of a two-cycle motored machine will therefore be im- 
mensely handicapped in runs and reliability contests, unless 
special provision is made for such motors in future events. 
To cover the same distance as a machine fitted with a four, 
larger tanks must be provided, which increases the weight 
and correspondingly decreases the speed and ease of handling 
the machine. For roadster service, it is doubtful if the two- 
cycle motor will ever be used, at least in its present form. 
Equally so in racing or reliability contests, and this relegates 
it to the work of carrying heavy riders, commercial deliveries, 
or to being the plaything of experimenters. 

There are motors which are as yet in the chrysalis stage, 
in which scavenging, or the clearing out of the burnt gases, 
is accomplished by a draught of air or spray of water. These, 
for the most part, have a separate cylinder for creating the 
draught or spray, and valves for regulating the admission 
and exhaust of the scavenging means. The increase in weight 
by the use of such devices naturally acts against their use for 
anything but commercial truck work, and certainly no one 
would add a separate cylinder and its mechanism to a motor- 
cycle, particularly when the cylinder took away power from 
the motor in greater proportion than it added to it. For 
this reason, such scavenging motors are of no value to either 
the builder or user, and nothing further need be considered 
about them. 

At present, therefore, it appears best to keep to the four- 
cycle motor with its valves, etc. If the two-cycle motor did 
what its sponsors claimed for it, it would be ideal for the two- 
wheeler, and the four would slowly go out. If it is used in 
the future, the two-cycle motor will have a water-cooled head, 
pump or injector feed, a means of quickly and thoroughly 
removing the burnt gases from the cylinder, and it will 
probably be used with a two-speed gear. Lubrication will be 
conducted in the same manner as with the four-cycle motor. 



AN ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD RIDER. 



.. Jr 


n 


r^ ^ 




. Aft 


"TBpr 


i~ 


<m hr 


*^id 






V 






ip 


V p* 


m . 


V 


v 



MASTER WELTON KNARR, the youngest "Wagner" 
rider in the country, is but 11 years of age. He is 
riding one of the z x A H.P. regular stock models. His father, 
W. H. Knarr, who is also shown in the photograph, is a 
rural letter-carrier in Beloit, Kan. He is an enthusiastic 
' motorcyclist. The boy had learned to ride and handle his 
father's machine before he was ten years old. 

u'T'OM" McGARVEY, a member of the Chicago club, 
1 claims the record so far as acrobatic feats are con- 
cerned. As evidence of this claim he is displaying a bald 
spot on the top of his head, where the hair was recently torn 
off. McGarvey was out on a trip. Somewhere north of the 
city his machine did not work right and he caught hold of a 
passing street car for a tow. Things went all right until the 
wheels struck a rut on the side of the track; then, McGarvey 
states, he went into the air at least thirty feet, landed on top 
of his head, spun around six times, as near as he could recol- 
lect, and finally turned a complete somersault and lay on the 
road in an effort to collect his thoughts. 

When he came to, the hair was torn off his head, his body 
was sore and bruised and his machine damaged. The street 
car men came to his side and offered assistance, but he de- 
clined. A farmer brought him to the city. A Chicago physi- 
cian dressed his head and the machine is being repaired. 
McGarvey says that he has an entry in his diary, "champion 
acrobat of the world." jg jg 

JUST ANOTHER PROSPECT. 

THIS little fellow evidently has the right stuff in him, even 
though his limbs be too short to enable him to pedal 
up his engine. With the lengthening of his legs, his en- 
thusiasm will undoubtedly grow, until the joys of motorcy- 
cling are within his reach. His name is William Bartels, of 
Erie, Pa., and he is mounted on his father's Greyhound. 




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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



SPRINGFIELD TRACK VERY FAST 




De Rosier, Hedstrom, Huyck and Gustafson Indulging in Speed Try- Outs. 



t f^ CONTRARY to expectations, there was no racing on 
I ^^ the new Springfield Stadium last Saturday after- 
|p3g£5 noon. The date had been set for the opening of 
Ifig S fflj J the three-lap, circular board track which Jack Prince 
has built there, but the weather man acted as 
queerly as to put a kibosh upon the eager expectations of sev- 
eral thousands who had wended thither to see records an- 
nihilated. That was not to be, for these reasons : It rained 
incessantly on Friday, and Jupiter Pluvius seemed to promise 
for all of Saturday a continuation of wetness. It was fine for 
the farmers, of course, but just the contrary for racing men. 
As a result, those who were telephoned to at Boston, Worces- 
ter, Providence and elsewhere, declared that, owing to the 
excessive precipitation, they could not come. That settled 
it, and accordingly the postponement, for one week, of the 
opening events, was announced by the promoters. By noon 
the sun was shining, and for the balance of the day the 
weather was ideal, but it was then too late to make possible 



the running off of the program as originally outlined. 

Jake De Rosier, Walter Goerke, Fred Huyck and A. G. 
Chappie, together with a number of lesser lights, were present 
Only Huyck and Chappie, however, donned their racing clothes 
and made a few circuits of the track. One of Huyck's miles 
was timed at 45 seconds— one of the timers had 44^. 
Chappie's best performance approximated 47. Earle L. Oving- 
ton, finding it absolutely necessary to get rid of his surplus 
enthusiasm, borrowed an Indian from a simon-pure private 
owner and, with all of his holiday habiliments, propelled a 
regular stock machine around the course in a fraction over a 
minute. 

There was a goodly attendance, despite the uncertainties of 
the weather, and indications favor the success of the venture. 
The track is undoubtedly fast, and while it is not perfectly 
fitted for competition on the part of a large field of entrants, 
it is certain to be the scene of many record-breaking perform- 
ances before the close of the racing season. 



THE ten-mile handicap, at Brighton, Friday, was won 
by Stanley T. Kellogg on a Merkel. His time was 
10.16 2-5. He was the scratch rider. Second was J. F. 
McLoughlin, N. S. U., with sixty seconds handicap, and third 
F. B. Decker, Indian, with 90 seconds handicap. 

There were several mishaps in this race. Fred Voelker, 
on a seven h.-p. N. S. U., went through the fence on the 
eastern turn and was thrown. He was bruised slightly. Ed- 
ward Seery, also riding a seven h.-p. N. S. U., received 
cuts and bruises in dashing off the track. A. G. Chappel, 
riding a five h.-p. Indian, was thrown at the end of the 
first mile when his front tire collapsed. He was stunned for 
a second. In the race Kellogg jumped into the lead and held 
it, taking tj^e curves with daring. 



TOPEKA, Kansas. — Now that the turmoil of fixing an age 
limit for automobile operators is over, and further 
changes are proposed in the automobile ordinance, the motor- 
cyclists of Topeka have dashed into the limelight. They pro- 
test against being forced into complying with the drivers' 
license section and turning over a dollar apiece to the auto- 
mobilists. They will endeavor to reach what they deem a 
more equitable agreement with the council as to the payment 
of license fees. The indications point to their success in this 
endeavor. 

Miami, Fla. — "Please renew my subscription. Am well 
pleased and would not do without it. 

•7. W. Harper." 



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17 



George W. Sherman Against the Proposed Rules 



Editor Motorcycle Illustrated : 

NOW that the committee appointed last year to revise 
the F. A. M. competition rules (or rather a minority 
of the committee) has finally completed its work, I sin- 
cerely hope that the M. I. will lend its assistance in the 
fight for a square deal to all, which the revised rules 
certainly do not give to any one. Although I am not sure 
that it is not a good name to apply to the would-be trade 
rider class, which it is proposed to create, perhaps you 
may not care to call it the "yellow dog class," but you 
ought to find some such name to properly describe it; no 
mild words will do. 

It is pretty "hard lines," when a man is doing a certain 
line of work not connected with sport, that because of that 
fact, and no other, he is singled out and placed in the back- 
yard or dog-house of the sport, which is where the new 
rules would place him. Now, I am engaged in promoting 
the sale of Thor motorcycles, and I have been engaged in 
the motorcycle business since the beginning. I think I 
have conducted myself as decently and as squarely as any 
man in any sport. I never received a dollar for competing 
anywhere, and I have never paid a cent to any one for the 
purpose. I have tried to help motorcycling in every fair 
and sportsmanlike way possible, and I certainly object to 
being forced into a freak, or what-is-it class, where I do 
not belong and where I have no wish to go, and which is 
absolutely un-American and contrary to the principles of 
fair play and a square deal. I object as strenuously to all 
employees of the Thor establishment being forced into 
such a class, simply because they happen to be earning 
their living by working for the Aurora company, and also 
I protest against such compulsion and unfairness to Thor 
agents, who will be similarly treated solely because they 
sell or repair Thor motorcycles. I don't believe the own- 
ers, employees or agents of many other motorcycle estab- 
lishments will relish such treatment, but I use the word 
Thor merely to emphasize the meaning and effect of the 
revised F. A. M. rules. I have talked with enough men in 
the trade to know that I am not alone in my opinions. 

I have a young son, who often reads the motorcycle 
papers and takes a lot of interest in motorcycle doings, and 
if ever he asks me what the revised rules mean I think I'd 
have to hang my head and change the subject; for if the 
rules mean anything they indicate either that the motor- 
cycle business is repulsive, or that the men in it are a lower 
order of beings or sportsmen than men in other industries. 
In other words, to use slang, we are "bum sportsmen," an 
imputation which I resent as vigorously as words will per- 
mit. In fact, a careful reading of the rules does not con- 
vince me that they do not place even my boy and the sons 
of other men in the trade in the "trade rider" or "bum 
sport" class. They say that a private owner is "one who is 
not directly or indirectly connected with a person in the 
trade," and as my son is very directly connected with such 
a person, presumably he, just because he is the son of his 
father, 'falls in that distasteful class. Perhaps this is a too 
technical interpretation, and maybe the framers of the rule 
did not mean it that way; but that is what it says, anyway. 
Then again, maybe the framers were afraid that some 
dealer might lend his son or brother or brother-in-law a 
machine and the rule may mean what it says. Can you tell 
us its meaning? 

But it's a fine rule(?). The men in the trade are not to 
be permitted to pick their company. Without so much as 



with a "by your leave" they are to be kicked bag and 
baggage into the back-yard of sport and forced to mix with 
the bums and mugs of any other sport who may care to get 
up against them, but who really will be better than the 
men of the trade, for they (the bums) can ride as "private 
owners" and the private owners can't say a word against 
it. Think of "Kid" McSwinnegan, "Plug" McCarthy, 
"Battling" Boozem, "Young" Biffem and all the rest of 
the plug riders, who are from all amateur sports, riding as 
private owners and making professionals of every other 
private owner or trade rider who gets up against them. 
Think of the trade rider who doesn't want cash, and who 
values his amateur standing, being forced to become a 
professional in all sports simply because he will be forced 
to ride for cash or with cash takers. Oh! yes; those rules 
promote sportsmanship, but with a darned small "s," and 
to think that a private owner visiting Europe can ride for 
cash over there, while if he did it here he would be cast 
into the back-yard with the "bum sports." That's fine too. 

What good will the revised rules do? How will they 
clean the sport? Will the "private owner" who is built 
that way hesitate to take cash or ride a machine "pur- 
chased" for a particular occasion any more than "amateurs" 
who have done the same thing. I don't think you, Mr. 
Editor, believe it any more than I do. If a man is un- 
principled, changing his name won't change his principles. 
If any one wants to run races for private owners or trade 
riders, can't he do it under the present rules and without 
casting a reflection on any legitimate means of earning a 
livelihood, or forcing riders in other classes to meet men 
who will hurt their standing in other sports? Of course 
he can. What's the matter with the definitions amateur 
and professional? They fit in all other sports; why not 
ours? What's the need for change; will it make men more 
honest? If so, how? 

I truly feel more deeply on the subject of those rules 
than I can say in words. I believe the business in which 
I am engaged is respectable and the men in it as respect- 
able as the men in any other business. I don't believe very 
many of them are "bum sportsmen." Not even by infer- 
ence do I wish to be classed as one, and I believe most of 
the men who make, sell or repair motorcycles are of the 
same mind. I believe the real sportsmen who are not of 
the trade will agree with us, and more quickly since the 
revised rules "put it all over" them, too. I have my own 
ideas of the motives responsible for these rules. They 
were selfish motives, but so cleverly worked that a few 
men had the wool pulled over their eyes. 

I was appointed a member of the rules committee, but 
as it held but one meeting (a thousand miles from here) 
during the whole year, I was unable to attend. The pro- 
ceedings of that meeting were held secret, and the first I 
knew of them was when I received a copy of the rules with 
a request to vote within twenty-four hours. The letter said 
there was no time to wait for the approval of the F. A. M. 
Perhaps this is the right way to do things, but I doubt it. 
I believe the F. A. M. will have a whole lot to say on the 
subject, and that every man who believes in a square deal 
and wants harmony in the organization will repudiate these 
rules and thus save private owners from being forced to 
become professionals, and permit the men in the trade to 
hold up their heads in any company. I shall be greatly 
disappointed if Motorcycle Illustrated does not take this 
view. Geo. W. Sherman. 



The speed of a machine is easily changed by moving 
the igniter cam backward or forward, depending upon the 
rider's desire to obtain higher or lower velocity. 

Eagle Grove, Iowa. — "Sure thing. Here's the dollar. Like 
the paper very much. "L. W. Worthington." 



Attalla, Ala. — "Please renew my subscription. Motorcycle 
Illustrated is without doubt the best paper of its kind pub- 
lished. "Charles P. Shahan." 

PUSH ! If you can't push, PULL— if you can' pull, please 
get out of the way.—/?. A. Pickens, in Sparks. 



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August 1, 1909. 




Glenn H. Curtiss, Now a "Bird," on His Famous Eight-Cylinder Machine. 
CURTISS EARNING HONORS IN THE AERONAUTICAL FIELD. 




iLKNN H. CURTISS, of Hammondsport, 

engine builder, motorcycle manufacturer, 

racer and aeronaut, is fast becoming 

famous throughout the entire world of 

science and sport. Curtiss is "making 

good" with his latest aeroplane. He finds 

flying to be as easy as travelling astride 

the saddle of a terrestrial thing like the 

motor-driven two-wheeler. The daily 

papers abound in recitals of his wonderful exploits. Curtiss 

is about to leave for Europe, determined to bring back the 

international aeronautical championship prize. 

Glenn H. Curtiss' sudden leap to the front of the stage as 
an aviator has been the talk of the last week both here and 
in Europe. While it is true that Curtiss' present records do 
not come up to those of the Wrights and perhaps a half dozen 
other men in Europe, there are certain elements of promise 
in the man and his machine which have led many experts to 
predict that he will hold a place in the first rank before the 
summer is over, says the New York Herald. 

Fundamentally he possesses all of the requisites for a suc- 
cessful aviator. He is active, cool-headed, has an abundance 
of nerve without foolhardiness, and thoroughly understands 
the machine he is operating. Another point in his favor is 
that he is a builder of gasoline engines, and the engine is the 
heart of the heavier-than-air flying machine. 



Of all the aeroplanes here or abroad that have made good 
records, perhaps none has shown such uniformly good be- 
havior or received so much popular praise and admiration as 
the Curtiss machine. Others have flown further, a few have 
flown faster, but none of them has flown so promptly and in 
such a businesslike manner as the Gold Bug. The machine 
itself gives one the impression of a very spirited little pony, 
as compared with the larger and more cumbersome machines 
of the Wright model. It is well poised on its wheels, is neatly 
and compactly built in every spot and looks as though it were 
made to fly, and fly swiftly. 

When it is ready to go there is no delay, no tiresome tuning 
up or tinkering with the motor and no laborious lifting of 
weights and adjustments of starting rail. Curtiss merely 
steps into the machine, starts the motor, and in less than five 
seconds the machine is in the air. Ordinarily it runs on the 
ground about two hundred feet, or until it has gained a 
velocity of about twenty-six miles an hour, when the operator 
tilts the forward rudder a few degrees so as to catch the air, 
and the machine rises instantly. 

It is that easy fashion of getting off the ground that has 
caught the admiration of those who have seen the Curtiss 
machine and led them to the conclusion that it more nearly 
approached a practical flying machine than anything yet 
produced. 



THERE is a tendency abroad to lighten machines at the 
expense of the tank, reducing its capacity. While light- 
weight machines are undoubtedly in big demand, this method 
of seeking to satisfy it ought not to be imitated in this 
country. It is hardly likely that it would be popular. The 
capacity of the gasoline tank should be sufficient to carry the 
rider an even hundred miles. 



AMONG the most likely causes of loss of power are lack 
of proper compression, loose piston rings, choked car- 
bureter or feed pipe, a fault in the ignition system and weak- 
ened valve spring?. 

An Index to Advertisers will be found on page 37 of this 



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August 1, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 19 



COMMITTEE MEN RETORT 

To Our Fellow Members of the F. A. M. and Others Interested in the Sport of Motorcycling 



IN the Bicycling World of July 17th there appeared two articles about the "Yellow Dog Class" and "Would Profes- 
sionalize All." As both of these articles bear upon the work done by the Committee to Revise the F. A. M. Competi- 
tion Rules, and as the articles referred to are misleading and false in almost every particular, we, the 
undersigned, all being present at the meeting of the committee at which the proposed F. A. M. Competition Rules were out- 
lined, deem it right and just to make the following facts known to the F. A. M. membership at large and others inter- 
ested in the sport of motorcycling, in order to counteract the effect of the grossly misleading articles referred to, and to 
prove that the confidence placed in us by our election as members of the committee has not been misplaced. 

(a) No effort is being made to "blast amateurism"; in fact, vigorous efforts are being made to cleanse amateur- 
ism, as applied to motorcycle competition in America. Our proposed definition of a private owner is the idteal definition 
of the amateur motorcycle rider. Under the present rules most of the so-called "amateurs" are nothing more than trade 
riders who are paid salaries and bonuses for riding. In our opinion it is not fair to put in open competition the trade rider, 
with the almost unlimited facilities of a large factory behind him, and the real private owner who pays for his mount, pays 
his own expenses, and who foots his own repair and replacement bills. In an effort to give the bona fide amateur real 
protection, instead of the almost entire lack of protection he obtains under the existing rules, we have established the 
Private Owner Class, and defined the private owner in such a manner that no rider other than the pure amateur can 
possibly be put in this class. 

(b) The articles in the Bicycling World speak of our Trade Rider class as the "Yellow Dog Class," and further slate 
that we brand them in this class "as sportsmen who not only do not ring true, but who cannot ring true." This is abso- 
lutely false. There is no disgrace in belonging to the motorcycling trade ; in fact, the undersigned, who are in the trade, are 
rather proud of it than otherwise. In establishing the Trade Rider class we have simply put those motorcycle compet- 
itors together who are given outside assistance, and who rightfully should not be allowed to compete with the private owner 
who has not the benefit of such assistance. The very fact that the world's records are in every case held by acknowledged 
trade riders goes a long way to prove the great advantages the trade rider has over the private owner. 

(c) The articles referred to lead the reader to believe that every employee in the motorcycling or the motor vehicle 
trade is necessarily a trade rider and will always remain so. Attention is called to the sentences in the proposed rules as 
follows: "A private owner is one who has never competed in motorcycle competition as a trade rider," and "a trade 
rider is one who is connected with the motorcycle trade." It will be seen that a man may be vitally and prominently con- 
nected with the trade, and later, after leaving the trade, he may, if while in the trade he never competed in motorcycle 
competition, compete as a private owner. On the other hand, if he has ever competed as a trade rider he is thereafter 
in the trade rider class. And it is right and intended that he should be, for he has gained an advantage over the private 
owner by his connection with the trade, and it is not fair and just to force the private owner to compete against such odds. 

(<f) The aforementioned articles stated that in order that a majority of the committee might be present 
two outsiders were "rung in" at the last moment. This statement has no foundation in fact. Two hours before the meet- 
ing, and before there was any idea as to how many members of the committee would be present, letters were produced 
by two F. A. M. members authorizing them to act in the place of previously appointed members who could not be present. 
President Ovington, in whose hands the appointment of the committee has been placed, and after being appealed to by 
the chairman of the committee, appointed the authorized representatives to serve in the place of the absentees. 

(e) It is true that by a vote of the committee secrecy was maintained as to what was done at the first meeting. This 
was done for the common good, as the committee did not wish the press to discuss its plans until the plans were decided 
upon and in shape for presentation. When this time arrived, after the completion of the rules, copies were mailed to 
the two members of the committee connected with the motorcycle press. No breach of parliamentary practise was made 
in maintaining secrecy in the early stages of the work, as this procedure is one often adopted by deliberative assemblies. 

(/) Under the existing rules it is practically impossible to allow our riders to compete abroad without being pro- 
fessionalized. The United States, like other nations, should be affiliated internationally. The proposed rules have pro- 
vided for this, and under them our riders can show the world that the American motorcycle and the American motor- 
cyclist is second to none of other nations. w 

(g) The Bicycling World articles state that one of the members of the committee came to the hotel where the 
meeting was held and could not find the meeting. The facts are these: The meeting was called for 10 A. M., and 
the members present waited one hour and fifteen minutes in the lobby, i. c, until 11:15 A. M.) of the hotel before the 
meeting was called to order. While the meeting was in progress no less than four persons found the place of meeting 
without any difficulty whatever. If fotnv other parties found the room in which the meeting was held, why couldn't the 
member who claims he was "shut out" ? All he had to do was to ask at the hotel desk, where specific directions were left 
as to the place and character of the meeting. _ _ ' ; 

(K) One of the articles insinuates that the New York Motorcycle Club as a body disapproved of the proposed changes. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



This is untrue. An effort was made to force the members of the club to make such a resolution, but when the motion to 
adjourn to stop the discussion was introduced it was carried by a large majority of the assembled members. 

(•") As to the status of the F. A. M. members in the eyes of other sports-governing bodies, the proposed rules create 
no different state of affairs than exists to-day in the automobile, yachting and similar fields of outdoor sport and recrea- 
tion. Our rules do not establish a precedent, but rather follow that which has gone before in sports older than the sport 
of motorcycling. 

(/) The articles referred to state that an effort is being made to "railroad" the new rules through. In order to 
show that this is not the case the committee has decided to present the rules proposed at the annual meeting at Indian- 
apolis and put it to the vote of the members present as to whether they should be adopted or not The undersigned be- 
lieve the new rules far superior to the old, since they offer protection to the bona fide amateur (the private owner), 
and instead of being afraid of the limelight and opposition they welcome it. And when the members have the whole matter 
put before them at Indianapolis, where unfair criticism and misleading statements will not be tolerated, the committee 
have no doubt as to what the verdict will be. 

Considering the articles in the Bicycling World as a whole, the undersigned do not hesitate in saying that these articles 
are misleading and contain many statements that are absolutely false. They criticise unfairly the work which has been 
passed by a majority of the committee chosen by the F. A. M. to revise the old rules, and a committee composed of fifteen 
of the representative men interested in the sport of motorcycling in America. 

(Signed) 

W. F. REMPPIS, DR. J. P. THORNLEY, 

Chairman of Committee for Revision of F. A. M. Rules. Chairman of the F. A. M. Competition Committee. 

EARLE L. OVINGTON, President of the F. A. M. STANLEY T. KELLOGG, New York City. 

GEORGE M. HENDEE, Springfield, Mass. EDWARD BUFFUM, Pottstown, Pa. 

[Note. — All of the above were present at the meeting of the committee when the proposed rules were outlined.] 



DEATH OF GEORGE T. ROBIE, OF THE EXCEILSIOR SUPPLY COMPANY. 



/^ EORGE T. ROBIE, president and founder of the Excel- 
^** sior Supply Company, and one of the leading business 
men of Chicago, died at the Chicago Hospital early Sunday 
morning, the 18. 

Mr. Robie became ill late in the week, and last Saturday 
night it was found that an operation for appendicitis would 
be necessary. He was immediately removed from the Hotel 
Windemere to the hospital, where the operation was per- 
formed. Owing to the advanced stage of the trouble, Mr. 
Robie was unable to survive, and passed away early Sunday 
morning. 

Mr. Robie was born in Walworth, N. Y., March 26, 1853, 
and came to Chicago at the age of twenty. In 1876 he estab- 
lished the Excelsior Supply Co., and soon became the leading 
dealer in sewing machine supplies and equipment. When 
the bicycle became prominent Mr. Robie took on bicycle sup- 
plies, and in a short time became the leader in that line. Fol- 
lowing his policy of aggressiveness, as soon as the auto- 
mobile became an established element, the Excelsior company 
assumed the same position in the automobile supply business 
that it had previously held in the line of sewing machines 
and bicycle supplies. 

The latest addition to the Excelsior line is the Excelsior 
auto-cycle, which was placed on the market about a year and 



a half ago. While Mr. George T. Robie has assumed no 
active control in the development of this product, he has been 
deeply interested therein, and took great pride in the remark- 
able success of that machine. Mr. Robie retired from active 
business some time ago, and has devoted considerable time to 
touring and to his many club and society affiliations. 

Mr. Robie held a prominent position in the National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers and in the Chicago Association of 
Commerce. He was one of those who made the recent trip 
to Seattle. He was a member of the Union League, Chicago 
Athletic, South Shore, and Chicago Automobile clubs. Mr. 
Robie was a member of the Englewood Blue Lodge, Normal 
Park Chapter, Imperial Council, Englewood Commandery, 
Oriental Consistory, and Medinah Temple. He leaves a 
widow and one son, Fred C. Robie, who has for some time 
been the working head of the Excelsior Supply Co. 

Mr. Robie, who was a firm believer in organization, had 
gathered about him a group of department managers who 
worked together with mechanical precision, and his various 
interests will be well conserved despite a universal feeling of 
sorrow over the loss of a dear friend. This Mr. Robie was 
to all his employees; always approachable, always ready 
with a smile and kind word, lenient with those who were 
delinquent at times, and ready with sincere approbation for 
those who merited it. 




A Few of the Members of the Portland, Ore., Motorcycle Club. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



21 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Vol. IV. 



AUGUST i, 1909. 



No. 15. 



Published 

Twice a Month, 1st and 15th 

By the 

Motorcycle Publishing Company 



F. P. PRIAL Pres. and Treas. 



THOS. HILL LOW, Sec 



Offices, 299 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Telephone, Worth 3691 



Home Subscriptions, $1.00 Foreign Subscriptions, $100 
Single Copies, 10 cts. 

Entered as second class matter July 6th, 1908, at the Post Office 
at New York, N. Y., under act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

General Editorial and Business Direction 
F. P. Prial 



J. Leo Sauer 
L. H. Cornish 



Editor 
Advertising 



OUR FEDERATION SPECIAL. 

SOUNDS like a railway ad.— Federation Special But it's 
not; 'tis merely the musical title selected by us to mark 
our August 1 issue, this issue. As we so often say, the 
publisher may not stand still. He may produce ever so good 
a paper,. maintaining a high level of quality, issue after issue; 
but if he fails, from time to time, to get out a big number, 
folks think, believe or feel that he's falling off, going behind. 
So, in spite of the dog days, the F. A. M. Annual affording 
the opportunity, we bent to the task, and fired a lot of grape- 
shot all over the country — with this result. 

This issue of Motorcycle Illustrated is the largest, by far 
the largest exclusive motorcycle paper ever printed, and being 
that, it is vastly significant Our 1908 August 1 issue had 
seventeen pages of advertising. This issue has forty-six. 
Quite a growth, eh ? And it means one thing above all others. 
It is a faithful index of the growth of the motorcycle trade. 
People don't place advertising for love. They use printers' 
ink because they need it, because they can pay for it, and 
because it will pay them. This being the case, it may be ac- 
cepted as axiomatic that the growth of motorcycling within 
the past year is as 45 to 17, about 160 per cent. We believe 
that, if the figures were obtainable, at least this per cent, of 
increase would be shown. 

Jt Jt 

AN anxious correspondent, just recovered from an invol- 
untary encounter with a mongrel, writes for advice 
as to how to meet one of this species of quadrupeds. He 
wishes to know whether he should shut off power, or open 
op his throttle wide with a determination to converting the 
obstruction into sausage meat. This is a most important 
problem and, for the good of the sport, it ought to be 
solved. But how? If a equal the toughness of his dog- 
ship, b the distance between him and the oncoming ma- 
chine, and x (unknown), the decision of the rider, what shall 
be our equation? How are we to learn whether the solu- 
tion be a sudden stop or swerve, inviting a spill, or in- 
creased power straight ahead, all the aforesaid canine's 
obstinacy to the contrary notwithstanding? In any event, 
we hope the manner in which we have put the problem will 
assist some of our ingenious readers to supply our inquiring 
friend with a satisfactory answer. 



MR. GEORGE SHERMAN, not to know whom is to 
acknowledge oneself unknown, is "dead set" against 
the new rules. He says it in this issue. We gladly print 
his letter. We do not agree with it in many particulars; 
but we will refrain from discussing it in print The In- 
dianapolis meet is not a week off and the matter will be 
fully and perhaps painfully discussed on the floor of the 
convention. So we pass it up except as to one point. It 
was hardly necessary for Mr. Sherman to hope that 
Motorcycle Illustrated will be found on the side of 
the "square deal." The aspiration is and was superfluous. 
Motorcycle Illustrated don't know any other kind of a 
deal but the "square deal." In this case of re-classification, 
however, the problem is: What is the square deal? And a 
knotty problem it is, too. One man may hold one view, 
another man a totally different vitw, but both may be and 
probably are honest in their opinions. Our own position 
is that so much mis-information and venom have been ex- 
pended on the entire proposition that it would require ten 
pages of this paper to outline the refutations, objections, 
views, etc., that casually occur to us. As only about fifteen 
per cent, of our readers consider the question a vital one, 
we decline to use these ten pages for elucidation or perhaps 
for the sowing of still more density. Indianapolis will tell 
the story. 

J« J« 

<<r\ON'T destroy our idols," the reactionaries cry. "We 
Ly have worshipped at the shrine of an antiquated 
classification for many a year and we dearly love the gods 
of our own designing. What matters it what our prayers 
have been unanswered? What care we if our state has 
grown from bad to worse? What difference does it make 
that our faith be built upon the sands of faulty premises? 
Did we not build it, and isn't that sufficient reason why all 
others should accept it forever? Why break up our fond 
illusions, ye inconoclasts? What moots it even though ye 
be more nearly right than we, if what ye propose is differ- 
ent? We have become attached to our beliefs of ancient 
lineage, and we simply cannot desert them. Don't disturb 
us for, even though we know we are wrong, it would hurt 
us sorely to be forced to make a change." 

This is the plea what is about to be carried from New 
•York to Indianapolis, to be bathed in tears on the floor of 
the convention. Be on your guard, those of you who are 
sentimental and subject to the influence of men whose 
strength lies in their very weakness. Be aware of the fact 
that they will resort to the threadbare but sometimes still 
powerful expedient of playing upon the chords of human 
emotion, in order to achieve their ends. 



WHEW! The boys in this business are getting fore- 
handed. One firm, new in this business, announces 
that it will have a 1910 model at -the F. A. M. meet, while 
one of the old stand-by concerns writes: "Reserve us a half 
page in your August 1st issue for a description of our 1910 
model." Another maker of repute, we are authoritatively 
informed— one who has been in a frenzied state of "behind 
orders" much of this year— has already closed all his 1910 
contracts for material and such fitments as he himself does 
not make. This policy of making ready long before cannot 
be too highly commended It spells comfort and coolness 
for the factory and office staff, and bigger profits for the 
bosses or stockholders. Men who are constitutionally in* 
clined to procrastinate will please sit up and take notice. 



THE total advertising in this paper, May, June and July, 
1908, compared with the same period of last year, shows 
an increase of 300 per cent. In publishing, that is quite 
phenomenal. The expenses have increased in about the same 
proportion. That's quite sad. But inasmuch as they have 
gone towards improving the paper and trebling its circulation, 
we are satisfied. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



THE PROPOSED NEW RULES 

Some Snapshots at Them From Various Viewpoints 



THE veiled hints about self interest are aimed at the 
man whose company has played so large a part in 
motorcycle racing. It is true that no direct charge has 
been made against him either verbally or in print; but all 
the gossip points his way. Charges of this sort, whether 
made in public or in private, whether stated openly or 
merely insinuated, are baseless, and to those who know, 
disgusting. At the committee meeting this gentleman 
displayed a deep and broad knowledge of the ethics and 
practices of motorcycle racing and of other sports. He 
himself has been engaged in and has been a close observer 
of several kinds of sport for over twenty years. He was 
himself once a champion, and his career was a varied one. 
Throughout it all, however, no one ever hinted that he was 
a dishonest sportsman, though in his day the temptations 
were many. Those who know him best would never dream 
of such a thing fbr a moment. Even his bitterest enemies 
to-day (as a matter of fact he has no bitter enemies and 
absolutely no personal enemies. But of course, naturally, 
there are trade jealousies) not one of them could say that 
he was ever otherwise than always above-board. At the 
meeting in question he impressed every one who heard 
him with one idea; and that was a sincere desire to do 
everything in his power to create a set of rules which 
would be fair to all competitors, and which would make 
for the betterment and the expansion of motorcycling 
racing. He knows very well that motorcycle racing will 
attract the public in constantly increasing numbers if it 
is properly conducted, and that it will therefore be 
a potent factor in developing motorcycle riders. On the 
contrary he also knows equally well that one-sided sport, 
dishonest sport, or mismanaged sport will soon fall of its 
own weight, will fail to interest the public and will, in fact, 
be an absolute failure. As he has without doubt the largest 
personal investment in motorcycling of any man in this 
country, it is fair to assume that he is anxious that the 
best possible rules be evoked. Any other view of his 
position or of his actions is beneath discussion. 

Any person who could have attended the formal meet- 
ings of the committee, or who could have listened to the 
discussion on the "new rules" which cropped up whenever 
two or more members of the committee met, could not 
but believe that each man was actuated by honest motives, 
that the aim of each was to finally evolute a set of rules 
which would be simple, easily workable and which would, 
above all, meet present^conditions and put each man in 
the class to which he properly belongs. Any person who 
believes, either from hearsey, or grapevine telegraph, or 
from prejudiced print that self interest, hypocrisy, or 
anything of that kind is at the basis of the proposed new 
classifications has been altogether led astray. 

There is no hubbub, friction, fighting and contention in 
yachting on the question of amateur versus professional. 
When they want to have a simon pure event they simply 
announce that a boat will be manned by a crew of amateurs 
— that is, men who are not paid to sail boats or to operate 
them. In horse racing it is just the same. In this you 
have your paid jockey, who rides to orders; but occasion- 
ally there is an event for "gentlemen riders;" and these 
are the least interesting events of all. In automobiling 
they don't bother about these distinctions; but when they 
want variety they run an occasional event for "owners." 
It is only in athletics, bicycle racing and in motorcycling 
that this question has arisen. The result has been a fight 
lasting from 1853, since the question first became an issue, 
up to this very moment; and while conditions are rottener 



now than they ever were, the fight is fiercer than it ever 
was. In the old days the true amateur was a man of leisure 
who could afford to hire a trainer, and who could pay his 
own expenses anywhere he chose to go. This is the man 
who put up the fight against the other class of amateur. 
But this true "gentleman amateur" has ceased to exist, 
except in the dub class. 

The title of amateur has always had and to-day has a 
certain commercial value. In all sports a trade man would 
rather have an amateur working for him than the best 
professional extant. This is because the public is led to 
believe that the amateur is a gentleman sportsman, who 
pays his own way and who serves no particular interest. If 
he happens to be a motorcyclist and is riding, let us say 
the Arial motorcycle, the public thinks he has selected 
the Arial because he believes it to be the best machine; 
and, says the public, he, being an expert, ought to know. 
It is for this season that the crackajack amateur has more 
trade value than the professional, and, therefore, no mat- 
ter what rules are passed in Indianapolis, we will continue 
to find the crack amateur secretly bribed. Men in trade 
will figure out: "If Jones does it, why should not I?" As 
for the rider himself, he is naturally tempted by the money 
offered him. But if we threw away the title amateur we 
would remove this temptation. Therefore, why not be 
logical and throw it away? 

Some folks are weeping because the adoption of a trade 
rider class might fracture our relations with the A. A. U. 
and perhaps other bodies. Well, what if it should? The 
A. A. U. is an historical, highly respectable but moribund 
body. Within a fortnight we have been informed by a man 
who has made athletics a life study that most of the star 
performers in the A. A. U. receive cash for appearing at 
meets. We do not mean travelling expenses, for that is 
allowed by the A. A. U. rules. We mean a fixed, lump 
sum for going to a meet and competing at it, the sums 
depending entirely on the ability of the performer to in- 
crease the "gate/" The same authority stated that the 
authorities of the A. A. U. knew all about this but had 
never taken any action. 

The ideal class is one class, the prizes to be cash, 
trophies of whatever you will. That would eliminate ail 
discussion. It would then remain for the promoter to ar- 
range an interesting programme. A schedule of events 
somewhat like the following, but, of course, capable of 
many variations, would give each man a fair show. For 
instance, a race for men who have never won a prize; for 
club men; for men living within 25, 50 or 100 miles of the 
track; for men who have never beaten a minute for a mile; 
or done 25, 40 or 50 miles in the hour; for men who have 
never beaten 45 seconds for the mile; for non-trade riders, 
etc., etc., ad infinitum. 

An idealist writes us: The dearest possession of the 
sportsman of today is his status as an amateur. Pardon 
us, but this has long ceased to be the truth. The dearest 
possession and chief stock in trade of the amateur of 
to-day is the opportunity his purity title gives him to 
secretly hold up manufacturers for money, machines, etc.; 
and when the sport still further develops he will hold up 
the promoter and demand appearance money. Almost all 
the big guns in athletics are doing this to-day. You can't 
eat your cake and still have it. A man can't ride for a 
salary and still be classed with the man who don't. 

Reverting to the term "hired man," used in "new rules" 
discussion. We mean the term to have an honest ring. In 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



23 



the finality we're all hired men. One man is "bossed" by a 
boss. But the boss is bossed by the owners, and the 
owners are bossed by the banks, by the public, by change 
of fashion, by panics, by scores of things. The hired man 
who is most hired is the head man. The point we wanted 
to make clear is that the gods laugh when they see a man 
who paid to ride kicking up his heels and strutting about and 
posing as a Simon Pure. 

All decent motorcycle manufacturers are anxious to 
have the matter settled so that they will no longer be in a 
position which compels them to bribe capable amateurs. 
They feel the hypocrisy of the thing; and most of them 
don't want to be hypocrites. But you say: "Why do they 
do it?" Simply because track and road victories are ex- 
tremely valuable advertising just now. Their competitors 
do it and they are compelled to follow suit. To the ma- 
jority of them the practice is wholly and altogether dis 
tasteful. 

A certain important personage, who is also a member 
of the committee, stated that he was only ten minutes late 
at the now historic Astor Hotel meeting. The meeting 
was called for io a. m.; but the members waited in the 
corridors of the Astor Hotel until after n o'clock. A 
representative of Motorcycle Iixustrated called at the 
hotel after u o'clock and they were still in the corridors. 
They were still waiting for this member, hoping to have 
his views personally and verbally, and not in print. But 
it was not to be. 

The statement that the Competition Committee would 
"jam through" the rules is an untruth. The committee will 
simply submit its work to the F. A. M. convention and 
say: "This is the best we can do. It is for you to amend, 
or reject, or do anything whatsoever you will." This was 
and this continues to be the only way. The committee has 
the absolute power to hand the rules to the chairmar of 
Competition Committee and compel him to operate them: 
but they chose the other zvay, notwithstanding all talk 
of Tammany Hall methods to the contrary. 

Some of the men — a very few, be it said to the credit of 
human nature — who are calling for protection for the pure 
amateur, are at this very moment trying to bribe certain 
Simon Pures to ride their machines. And we don't blame 
them either. For it's the custom, It's all in the day's 
work. But the hypocrisy of the thing, the call for amateur 
protection while they arc themselves undermining it, that 
is simply appalling, even to a half honest man. 

At present we have a class of racing men who ride for 
cash. In one case the cash comes from a maker and in the 
other it comes from the promoter. But both ride for 
money; it is merely a difference of employers. So why 



shed tears, if both are grouped together. We assure you 
it's not worth while. The men themselves do not care as 
long as they continue to make a "good thing" out of it. 

If a man makes it his sole business to race for a manu- 
facturer on a salary basis he ought not to be any more 
ashamed of it than is any other honest workman who is 
paid for his labor. On the contrary, he ought to be proud 
of it. He need not be a "yellow dog" or any other sort 
of a dog. This dog suggestion, bye-the-bye, itself suggests 
rabies; and in this hot weather, too. 

When a club takes a man of great ability, as the New 
York Athletic Club and other athletic bodies have done 
since time immemorial, and feeds him, and gives him 
lodging, and a trainer, and a good "job," and sends him 
around the country, does that man remain a Simon Pure? 
Certainly not. He also is a hired man, and nothing else. 

A certain important personage, who is also a member of 
the committee, stated that he could not find the committee 
in session at the Astor Hotel, though they were there 
when he was there. If he could not find the committee, 
how can he ever hope to believe that he has found the 
panacea for all our present ills. 

No man has written to us to say that our discussions of 
the classifications have been "masterly productions." But 
to balance that, no half dozen men have said, "They are 
beneath contempt. The personal tone they take on is at 
once deplorable and unpardonable." 

It certainly implies a tremendous amount of courage in 
the one man who is shouting up to the blue vault: "I alone 
am right." Most of the men went at the work of recon- 
struction after prayer and fasting, so to speak. 

If a man who is a great athlete is fed, lodged and has his 
expenses paid from meet to meet is he an amateur? No, 
he is simply a hired man; so why weep over him. 

It is altogether too bad that the proposed changes could 
not be discussed cooly, philosophically; not with heat, or 
from the standpoint of blind, personal hatred. 

Motorcycle racing is not an athletic sport. It's the ma- 
chine a whole lot and the man very little. 

In any event Mr. Dwight Patterson and Master George 
W. Sherman, Jr., must not be sacrificed. 

The true definition of the genuine amateur to-day in all 
athletic sports is: A man who performs poorly. 

For our part give us the out-and-out "pro," providing he 
is an honest "pro." 

Ovington! Remppis! It's like flaunting a red flag at 
a bull. 



CURTISS flies his wonderful aeroplane for a whole week, 
fiies easily, gracefully and with perfect control. Then, 
on a Monday, a pupil takes it up and it comes down sud- 
denly, a wreck. After all, in most things in this world, it's 
the man who knows how that counts. In the old days, 
when one knew how exceeding well, they referred to him 
as the "man who can." This afterwards became ken, and 
finally king; and at one time a king was a man who could. 
Thus Curtiss is a King of the Air. 

WE note with regret the death of Mr. George T. Robie, 
founder of the Excelsior Supply Company. He was 
a gentleman, brainy and broad; a man of dignity and 
ability. 

The F. A. M. is upward of 3.000 strong. Let us have, at 
Indianapolis, a representation of at least 25 per cent. That 
would make an even 750, insure an interesting endurance run, 
exciting races, a fine convention and adequate enjoyment of 
all the opportunities for social intercourse. 



YOU who meet at Indianapolis to consider the new rules 
are to forget blind prejudice, personal bigotry, 
malice. What you have to do is to listen, discuss and 
decide. Look for logic; look for the practical. Don't ex- 
pect a rule that will ideally fit every case. There is none, 
nor ever will be. Vote for that classification which is prac- 
tical, which serves the majority; and don't be too con- 
founded sentimental. 

S J* 

A SENSIBLE Talk to Dealers is printed in this issue. 

It's good; deals with facts. The point made is that 

dealers start in too late and let up too soon. And the 
point is well taken. 

The F. A. M. is not incorporated. Vote to do so at 
Indianapolis. Its counsel informs us that it will cost only 
$13. At present each member of the F. A. M. is legally 
responsible for any and all of its liabilities. That is not a 
wise or entirely comfortable situation. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



Tips and Topics — By the Veteran 




WAS recently asked the reason for the almost uni- 
versal fitting of the spark plug over the inlet valve. 
In many early patterns we had the plug fitted in 
the center of the cylinder, but now the position over 
the inlet valve is almost standard. Theory, which 
*cems to be borne out by actual practice, teaches us that we 
get better running results when the plug is in this position. 
Theoretically, it is apparent that when the plug is fitted over 
the exhaust valve, the spark must occur in more or less dead 
gas, thus causing the ignition to be retarded. Again, there 
is danger of the plug points overheating. The universal adop- 
tion of a plug position over the inlet valve is based upon 
these two theories: The incoming mixture, being pure, is 
more likely to fire at once, and thus cause a more complete 
combustion of gas. Again, the incoming mixture tends to 
keep the plug cooler and this, of course, minimizes the chance 
of the plug points becoming incandescent, causing premature 
ignition. 

Jt Jt 

ON twin-cylinder design. — Recently the "pleasure" has been 
afforded me of pulling to pieces four well-known twin- 
cylinder engines, two of 1908 design, and two 1909 models. 
The most noticeable fault, common with all these "speedsters," 
was that the bearings of the engines seemed totally inadequate 
for the work they had to do. The big ends on a crank pin 
of almost the same size as that of a single-cylinder model, 
are much too short and, strange though it may seem, the 
centres of these, on three of the four machines, are not 
anywhere near in line with the centers of the wrist pin bush- 
ings. This gives one the impression that there is a very good 
chance of a "jam" occurring some unhappy day in the future. 
Surely, were the makers to slightly widen the crank case, 
this would not tend to make the machine look at all un- 
sightly. Then, one connecting rod could be made of fork 
shape, and could pass on either side of the other, giving it 
two bushes. This design would not be complicated and would 
certainly tend to bring the big end bushes central with those 
of the wrist pins, and thus effect the desired end. Again, 
the balancing of pistons seems to be a matter of guesswork 
nowadays. The fastening of the wrist pins was well attended 
to in three of the four motorcycles, but only one was fitted 
with light pistons, the others having pistons of far too great 
weight and solidity. The crank pins, too, should have been 
locked in some way; only one manufacturer attended to this; 
two of the others had attempted it, but the crank pins were 
slightly loose. However, I must confess a liking for twins 
(twin cylinders, I mean), for even in an imperfect present- 
day twin there is a charming smoothness of action, great 
flexibility, with a power to "pick up" on hills that delights 
the soul. 

HIGHWAY masonry.— "Many a time and oft" have I been 
tinkering, by the roadside, and have had good Samari- 
tans stop and proffer aid. This has doubtless happened to all 
of us at times, and even though we may not need help from 
the expert, it is good to feel that a brother extends his sym- 
pathy—whether he be car driver or motorcyclist matters not. 
Perhaps it is the "touch of nature that makes the whole 
world kin" which causes us to feel thankful for the kindly 
act. Road courtesy is a great thing, and should be culti- 
vated — not to the extreme of officiousness, however. Some- 
times kindly meant actions back-fire upon the Samaritan. 
Jt Jt 

A "TROUBLE" diagnosis.— A friend brought me a "sick" 
machine recently. It was of battery ignition and had 
developed a bad misfire. The plug sparked merrily enough, 
when laid upon the cylinder, but when m place, misfiring set 
in, until the engine stopped. The spark from the coil was 
strong and extremely healthy ; in fact I tested this by accident 
and got a goodly shock. The insulation of the plug seemed 



all right and there was no shake to indicate a crack, while 
the points were adjusted correctly. No moisture, or dust, or 
any "shorting" material was to be found outside the plug or in- 
sulator ; in fact, everything seemed in shipshape order. How- 
ever, as an experiment, I tried a new plug, and immediately 
the trouble vanished. Then we dissected the old spark plug, 
and when we broke up the old porcelain we found that the 
whole root of the trouble was a broken central wire, which 
was as firm as a rock at the electrode points and gave no 
sign of internal trouble. 

J* J* 

HOW to remove a rusted nut. — When overhauling, one 
sometimes finds a refractory nut which refuses to yield 
even to the gentle persuasion of the largest wrench. Yet there 
is a way to get the nut "unput," as an inventive friend of 
mine says. Wrap some cotton, soaked in kerosene, around the 
beggar, and leave it for half an hour. By that time the kero- 
sene will have worked into the threads, and a little further 
persuasion will do the trick. 

J« •* 

THE right way to make electrical connections. — At one time 
I spoke of the advisability of fitting strong terminal clips 
wherever they are needed. These rarely come adrift or give 
any petty trouble on the road, but there are times when one 
has to make an electrical connection without the use of these 
handy little aids to the lazy. When making such a connec- 
tion, remember that there is a right way and a wrong way. 
The right way is first to twist the strands of the wire up 
tightly, and then to form the required loop from left to right. 
Then, when the screw or terminal is tightened, it closes the 
loop automatically; otherwise, when the loop is made in the 
opposite direction, the tightening of the terminal spreads the 
wire. 

J« Jt 

A "STICKING" spark plug.— When writing the former tip- 
let on rusted nuts, it struck me that a word might be 
said at the same time regarding plugs which develop the 
obstinate habit of sticking. The best way to cure the evil 
is to smear some graphite on the threads. Sometimes a plug 
thread is not uniform, and an application of graphite will 
ease it in, and, generally speaking, after this treatment, it will 
not be obstinate on any future occasion. On one machine 
which I owned some years ago, a mysterious leakage of com- 
pression would set up from time to time. New plug gaskets 
worked well for a time, but when the gasket was compressed 
a bit, the old fault would crop up with irritating persistency. 
At length I found that the casting on the cylinder head at the 
base of the plug was uneven, and thus it was impossible to 
obtain a gastight joint for any length of time. 
Jt Jf 

A PECULIAR accident. — Several years ago, whilst out on 
a speed jaunt, I had a difference of opinion concerning 
objective direction with an ancient hen. The hen ended its 
declining years by getting mixed up in the back belt rim, 
and the natural result was that I spread my stalwart frame 
upon the surrounding landscape and the machine also fell 
with a tintinabulating kosh, so to speak; After the usual 
chord from the orchestra, I answered Shakespeare's query, 
"What was the opinion of Pythagoras concerning wild fowl?" 
in seven different keys and three languages 1 At length I 
arose and, on examining the machine, found that, beyond 
sustaining a few superficial scratches, it was unhurt. The 
ancient hen had peacefully departed to the "happy hunting 
ground," and her astral body is doubtless wandering about 
the glassy sea, awaiting the arrival of those of us who reach 
the gates of Paradise with a perfect score and a no-stop run, 
as the Prophet Ezekiel has it. The earthly body of her 
henship was decapitated and I took her home, and after try- 
ing to eat the remains had to have my teeth re-bushed. I 
thought no more of the incident until about a week later 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



25 



when, going round a corner, endeavoring to make a noise like 
De Rosier, my handlebars came away in my hands, and it 
was only by leaning over at an angle of about nine million 
and a half that I got round the corner at all. Anyhow, I 
finished up in a stone patch which kindly knocked a* hole in 
my gasoline tank. On investigation I found that the handle- 
bar must have cracked at the lug, underneath the plating, 
and this must have occurred when I had the collision with 
the hen. The sudden strain of going round a sharp corner 
at full speed completed the damage. This little incident 
proves the need of overhauling a machine and carefully test- 
ing for breakages after a smash. 

TALKING of smashes, it is a wonderful thing how a spe- 
cial Providence seems to look after the welfare of motor- 
cycle racing men. Time after time we see a spill which looks 
to be fatal, after which the racer calmly picks himself up 
and strolls off the track. My experiences in this direction, 
although luckily only a few, make me think there is a reason 
for it. I recently read an article, written by a doctor, which 
explained why a child or a drunken man rarely got hurt. 
The solution to the problem lies in the fact that, in falling, 
if the limbs are relaxed and you go "all in a heap," so to 
speak, the result is rarely serious, beyond perhaps a few 
superficial scratches and bruises. Now, if one tries to save 
oneself, and stiffens at all — a limb may easily be broken. 
& Jt 

DON'T over-oil magnetos. — I obtained a convert to our 
ranks a short time ago and he purchased a 3j4-h.p. 
niagneto ignition machine. He coughed up to my humble 



dwelling the other night and told me that "the blame thing 
was kicking." It appears that he had been a zealous student 
of the "A B C Motorcycling," and was full to the brim of 
the subject. He had evidently taken to heart the advice to 
oil the magneto. He had done so, I should think, every day, 
for the magneto sweated oil at every pore. The contact case 
was brimful of oil, with the result that chronic misfiring had 
set in. Truly, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing! 

A GOOD makeshift. — It does one good to see ingenuity dis- 
played by the hardy rider. Of late I have seen two 
methods of transferring gasoline from the tank of one ma- 
chine to another, when the latter had run dry. The first 
method was the easier, but seemed to the onlooker as hardly 
appetising. The machines were placed side by side, whereupon 
the rider detached the long rubber tube which ran from his 
generator to the lamp, and syphoned the gasoline in, getting 
a start by sucking the rubber tube. The other method of 
doing the same job was effected by one machine being placed 
higher than the other, on the top of the curb; the horn of 
one was detached and the horn part inserted to act as a gaso- 
line funnel. 

u'T'HERE'S a reason." — Often when riding a motorcycle 
<*• that has had a fair amount of use, one finds that when 
the exhaust valve is slightly lifted, an immediate increase of 
power follows, and the machine seems to pick up quickly. 
There are two reasons which may account for this, and both 
show lack of perfect adjustment. The valve tappet may be 
worn or the carbureter may require more air. 



A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF NAMES OF AMERICAN AND FOREIGN MACHINES. 



WE recently published a list of about one hundred names 
of American and imported machines, new and old. 
Our invitation to readers to add to the list has produced a 
number of lists, the most comprehensive of which is that 
forwarded by Miss M. Low, 23 College street, Homerton, 
London, England. Miss Low's list contains no less than 257 
titles, and indicates, by the initials which precede each 
name whether the machines are English, American, French, 
Belgian, German, Dutch, Austrian or Russian. Those marked 
(?) are of doubtful ancestry. Here is Miss Low's remark- 
able compilation : 

(E) A. C, (E) Acacia, (E) Acme, (G) Adler, (E) Ad- 
vance, (F) Alcyon, (E) Alldays, (A) American, (E) An- 
glian, (B) Antoine, (A) Apache, (A) Armac, (E) Ariel, 
(E) Arno, (E) Armadale, (F) Aster, (F) Atelier, (A) Auto 
Bi, (F) Auto-Fanteuil, (F) Auto-Motor. 

(E) Baddeley, (E) Barnes, (E) Barry, (E) Baxter, (E) 
Bat, (E) Benktink, (E) Bercley, (E) Bichrone, (A) B. I. D., 
(E) Binks, (E) Blizzard, (E) Bowden, (E) Bradbury, (A) 
Bradley, (G) Brannabas, (A) Branson, (A) Bren, (E) 
Brooklands, (E) Brough, (B) Brown. 

(A) Californian, (E) Caldert, (E) Campion, (E) Carlton, 
(E) Certain, (A) Chappell, (E) Shater-Lea, (E) Chase (?)> 
C. C. R.. (E) C. I. E., (E) Clarendon, (E) Clement, (E) 
Clement Garrard, (E) Clessold, (E) Clyde, (E) Comet, (E) 
Corah, (F) Cotterean, (E) Coventry Eagle, (A) Crouch, 

(E) Crownfield, (A) Curtiss, (A) C. V. S. 

(E) Daw, (E) Daymar, (E) D. E. C, (F) De Dion (tri- 
cycle), (E) Derby, (E) Diamond, (E) Dot, (E) Douglas, 
(G) Durkopf, (E) Durwent, (E) Due. 

(E) Eddie, (A) E. D. F., (E) Eland, (E) Elf Kink, (E) 
Elgin, (A) Emblem, (D) Eole, (A) Erie, (E) Excelsior, 
(A) Excelsior, (D) Eyesink. 

(E) Fairy, (?) Feilback, (E) Fleetwing, (B) F. N. 

(E) Gamage, (G) G. B. f (E) G. O. K.. (F) Gobron Miner- 
va, (A) Goricke, (A) Green Egg, (A) Greenhound, (F) 
Griffon, (?) Guarantee. 

(E) Hadlef, (A) Harley Davidson, (R) Harry R. Greer. 

(F) Hertle Bruneau, (E) Hewittson, (?) H. H., (A) Hila- 
man, (E) Hobart, (E) Holdert, (R) Holley Auto-Bike, (E) 
Hopper, (A) Hornecker, (E) Hulbert Bramleaf, (E) 
Humber. 



(A) Indian, (E) Invicta, (E) Ivel. 

(E) Jones, (E) J. A. P., (?) Jehle, (F) Jehu, (E) Jowett, 
(E) Juno. 

(F) K. D., (B) Kelecom, (E) Kerry, (E) Kynoch. 

(E) Lagonda, (F) Lanandere, (E) Langham, (Aus.) Lau- 
rin Clement, (?) Lazarus, (E) Leader, (A) Light, (E) Lin- 
coln Elk, (?) Linden, (E) L. M. C, (Aus.) Laurin, (Aus.) 
Lurquin Coudert. 

(E) M. A. B., (E) Mabon, (A) Madison, (G) Magnet, 
(E) Mansfield, (A) Munson, (E) Marlborough, (Rus.) 
Mars, (A) Marsh, (E) Matchless, (E) Max, (A) Metz, 
(A) Merkel, (A) Midget Bicar, (B) Minerva, (A) Minne- 
apolis, (A) Mitchell, (A) M. M., (E) M. M. C, (E) Mont- 
gomery, (E) Moorhampton, (F) Motor Reve, (F) Moto- 
sacoche. 

(E) New Century, (A) New Era, (E) New Hudson, (E) 
Noble, (E) N. L. G., (E) Norton, (B) N. S. U. 

(E) Oakleigh, (?) Onaway, (A) Orient, (F) Ormonde, 

(A) Ortona, (E) Osborne, (E) Osmonde. 

(E) P. A. C. E., (E) Pebok, (B) Peiper, (F) Peugeot, 

(B) Phanoman, (E) Phelon Moore, (E) Phoenix, (E) Pio- 
neer, (A) Pierce, (E) Precision, (E) Premier, (E) Princeps, 
(B) Progress, (G) Pugh, (E) Pumbret, (E) Quadrant 

(A) Racycle, (E) Raleigh, (?) Rambler, (E) R. & P., 
(E) Regina, (A) Reliance, (E) Rex, (E) Relief, (E) Riley 
Auto-Bi, (E) Rip, (E) Roc, (B) Romania, (E) Rover, (A) 
Royal, (E) Royal Ajax, (E) Royal Consort, (E) Royal En- 
field, (A) Royal Pioneer, (E) Royal Sovereign, (E) Rush- 
worth, (A) Reading Standard. 

(B) Sarolea, (E) Scott, (E) Scout, (E) Service, (E) 
Sharp, (E) Shaw, (E) Silver, (E) Simms, (A) Simplex, 
(E) Sinclair, (E) Singer, (E) Sprinter, (E) Star, (E) 
Starlet, (E) Stevens, (A) Styria, (E) Swallow, (E) Swift. 

(E) The King (Cambridge), (A) Thomas Auto-Bi, (E) 
Thomas, (A) Thiem, (A) Thor, (A) Thoroughbred, (A) 
Torpedo, (E) Trafalgar, (E) Triumph, (E) Trump Jap. 

(E) Vinco Minerva, (E) Vindec, (E) V. S. 

(E) Waddington, (A) Wagner, (E) Wallace, (Rus.) 
Wanderer, (E) Weller, (F) Werner, (E) Westfield, (E) 
Westlake, (E) Whitley, (E) Wolf. 

(A) Yale, (B) Zedel, (E) Zenith, (E) Zenette. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



THEY MAKE AND PUSH THE YALE 




W. F. McGUIRE, A. B. COFFMAN. 

Manager and Head of Selling Force of the Consolidated Manufacturing Company, of Toledo, O. 



A FEW REMINDERS WHICH THE NOVICE SHOULD TAKE TO HEART. 



There is a certain faculty which makes starting on a low 
gear an entirely comfortable task. With high compression 
engines it is not well to suddenly release the valve lifter, 
as this may produce skidding of the rear wheel. Rather, 
let it down gradually, so that some of the compression may 
escape. Practice alone makes the operator perfect in this 
particular. Of course, everything must be properly ad- 
justed before the start. 

Jt Jt 

When the piston rings become worn they expand some- 
what, part of the charge passing between the rings and the 
piston. Sooting then takes place in the bottom of the 
groove, forcing the ring out against the surface of the cyl- 
inder, thus causing a slight loss of compression. 
Jt Jt 

Misfiring is caused either by a cracked porcelain — some- 
times the defect is so slight as not to be readily detected 
with the naked eye — or as a result of the interruption or 
short-circuiting of the current because of the lodgment of 
foreign matter inside the plug. 

Jt Jt 

If, on finding evidences of loss of compression, the rider 
has assured himself that all joints are gas-tight and that 
the piston rings and valves are right, then it is advisable to 
seek the trouble in a crack in the cylinder. 



Look to your coil only after having assured yourself 
that your batteries are strong enough, your wiring un- 
broken, your connections good, and that there is no 
shorting of your circuit. 

Jt Jt 

Sometimes a small piece of carbon or dirt will lodge 
in the exhaust stem guide, causing the valve to halt or even 
stop the motor. Give the valve stem a few turns with a 
pair of pliers. * & 

Difficulty is often met with during an effort to run a 
machine slowly. The inlet valve springs may be too 
strong for that purpose, or the jet too large. 
Jt Jt 

Hill-climbing troubles may be due to overheating, often 
caused by under-lubrication, a dirty muffler or worn valve 
cams. ^ 4j 

The links of belt fasteners should have broad, flat hooks 
made of sufficiently substantial metal to prevent snapping. 
Jt Jt 
The compression of an engine may be tested by pushing 
the machine along with the valve lifter released. 
Jt Jt 
An over-heated engine is very often the result of riding 
with the spark lever too far retarded. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



27 



THE AGENTS SECRET OF SUCCESS 




pT seems to be a common tendency with 

the average dealer in motorcycles, and 

particularly he who has a local agency, 

to cut the selling season short; it begins 

too late and stops too soon. Just why 

the dealers will not try to push the sale 

of motorcycles during the late fall and 

early winter months, is more than I can 

quite understand. It certainly cannot 

be because the new models are not out, for they put in their 

appearance as early as October i of each year. The big auto 

shows all come during the early winter. 

Most dealers have learned how hard it is to get prompt 
deliveries from the factory either for parts or machines dur- 
ing the months of April, May and June. Knowing these 
facts, why should they fail to profit by their past experiences; 
why should they expect the manufacturer to deliver a year's 
output during these three months? Yet that is exactly what 
they try to force the manufacturer to do, and then complain 
bitterly during the greater part of the remaining nine months 
of how many sales they lost because they could not get the 
goods. 

Whose fault is this, the manufacturer's or the dealer's? 
Most decidedly the dealer's. Simply because he begins the 
season too late and ends it too soon. Most dealers try to 
make themselves believe that the season is practically ended 
July i, when in reality the best motorcycle season is from 
then on up to December I, and in more than one-half of the 
country it is possible to ride twelve months of every year. 

If dealers would carry as large and complete a stock of 
motorcycles, parts and accessories during July, August, Sep- 
tember, October and November, as they usually do during 
April, May and June, they would not only more than double 
their sales, but would actually find themselves booking orders 
during December, January, February and March for spring 
delivery. They would have less trouble from their customers 
and with the manufacturer, simply because they would get 
deliveries promptly, and at the same time allow the manufac- 
turer ample time in which to build and deliver more perfect 
machines. 

This has been tried and is actually being done by a few 
wideawake dealers. For example, the writer knows of one 
dealer in a large city who used to sell only about fifteen 
machines in every season, and only during four months of 



the year. This dealer always had a grouch against the manu- 
facturer, claiming he was handicapped on deliveries. He was, 
but it was not the manufacturer's fault It was simply a case 
of starting too late and stopping too soon. He never placed 
his order with the manufacturer until the rider really needed 
the machine to use, which means that the order would not 
reach the factory until the rush season was on. 

He then began kicking and complaining because he had 
to wait. This same dealer thought nothing of holding back 
his order and keeping the manufacturer waiting months for 
an order. The results of this kind of orders paralyzed this 
particular dealer's business to such an extent that he nearly 
gave up the agency. 

The manufacturer happened into this dealer's place one 
day in early January and was a little surprised to find the 
dealer sitting comfortably in his office chair, apparently wait- 
ing for Spring without a sample demonstrating machine on 
the floor. During the manufacturer's visit, three young fel- 
lows called to learn if the dealer had anything new in motor- 
cycles. The dealer advised the young fellows that it was a 
bit early for the new ones and he had none of last season's 
left. After the interested prospects left, the manufacturer 
said, "Ji m » why don't you get in a sample or two of the now 
models. I have had them completed since last October. If 
you had one or more on your floor now, it is more than likely 
you could have secured those young fellows' orders and a 
deposit on the machines, placed the orders with me for 
future delivery, and receive perfectly built and thoroughly 
tested machines promptly on the specified date of delivery." 

The dealer acted on this suggestion, placed his order for 
a few machines and carried as complete a stock as he could 
afford right through the season up to December I. The 
result was he had no grouch against the manufacturer for 
non-deliveries and increased his sales from fifteen to nearly 
seventy-five machines. Think of it, five times the business 
he had ever done, simply because he worked at his job twelve 
months instead of three. 

Brother dealers, try it this season, and you will be sur- 
prised at the actual increase. It is just as easy to sell motor- 
cycles in September or November as it is in June, if you 
only try. It is really possible to book orders in December 
and January, and deliver in April and May. But the best of 
it is this: You will always have "what you want when you 
want it."—/?. A. Pickens, in "Sparks." 



THREE Grand Rapids boys, Jacob Arkema and John 
and Noel Houze, propose to demonstrate that it is 
possible to take a long and most delightful vacation 
a-straddle the speedy M put-putters." Their vacation will 
carry them over several thousand miles and require from 
6o to oo days. It will take them as far from home as the 
coast of Maine, and will show them a great deal of the 
country at small expense. 

Carrying blankets and some light camping apparatus in 
knapsacks on their shoulders they will camp by the road- 
side at the end of each day's riding, and will blend the 
pleasures of a camping trip with those of a motoring vaca- 
tion. 

Almost the first lap of their long tour is a water ride, 
however, for they have determined to visit friends in Mil- 
waukee and Oshkosh before starting East. They will thus 
find it necessary to ferry Lake Michigan. From Oshkosh 
they will strike South for Indianapolis where they will 
attend the big meet. From Indianapolis they will make 
straight for the Atlantic. Passing through Ohio, Pennsyl- 
vania, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire they will reach their objective point in Maine. 
The return will be made through Canada. 



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Jacob Arkema, John and Noel Houze. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



THE LOWELL MOTOR CARNIVAL. 



SENSATIONS OF A RACER. 

By EDDIE L1K6ENFELDEB. 



F OLLOWING the issue of entry blanks for the so- 
called "National Stock Chassis Competition of the 
American Automobile Association Under the Aus- 
pices of the Lowell Automobile Club," comes the 
announcement that the week beginning with Labor 
Day, Sept. 6, will be converted into a pretentious motor 
carnival the like of which has never before been attempted 
in this country. The five days' racing will mark a new epoch 
in automobile history and will attract the attention of auto- 
mobile enthusiasts from all over the country, as well as 
motorcyclists and motorboatists, who have also been allotted 
places on the carnival's programme. Three of the five days' 
contests will be run over the Merrimac Valley course, and 
the other two, which are for motorboats and motorcycles, will 
be held on the Merrimac River and on the boulevard respec- 
tively. 

The carnival will be inaugurated on Labor Day with an 
automobile race for the smaller made machines. There will 
be auto races on Tuesday and Wednesday also, a series of 
five motorboat events Thursday and Friday, while as a grand 
^limax to the carnival will come the races given over to the 
motorcyclists, which promise to see the establishing of sev- 
eral new records, as the Merrimac course is said to be in 
good condition this year and exceedingly fast 

The Lowell Automobile Club plans to have the course in 
the fastest shape possible for the races. Those who have 
charge of the race hope to see the breaking of record of 
53.6 miles average speed, established a year ago by Strang. 
The boulevard is in fast condition, but there is much to be 
done along the course, especially at the upper and lower turns 
and on the back stretch. The fastest time is expected to be 
made along the boulevard, where a large grand stand is to be 
erected. This will be connected with the other side of the 
river by a bridge, which will be convenient for those who 
come in special trains. In order to meet the extra expense, 
an admission fee will be charged to those who wish to 
approach the boulevard by the temporary pontoon bridge. 
The entire course will be policed. 
Jl Jl 

TO increase the r.p.m. of an engine, nothing is so effective 
as the replacement of weak* valve springs with those 
of greater tension. The difference is sometimes as great as 
forty per cent. Ignition, carburation and general design may 
be quite adequate, and yet, owing to the weakness of the 
springs, the number of revolutions per minute may be small. 
On the other hand, with stronger springs, the valves pit more 
easily, the exhaust valve is more likely to break, and there 
is a material loss of elasticity. 

Jl Jl 

BRITISH motorcyclists are complaining bitterly because 
of the appressive taxes they are called upon to pay. 
While the attitude of the government is by no means due to 
taaf misusing their road privileges, conditions on the other 
state should serve as a warning to those American riders 
Who would make the most of their opportunities, even at the 
expense of the public at large. 

Jl Jl 

IT'S free, is Sparks, the name of a new motorcycle monthly, 
j a sort of house organ gotten out by the American Motor 
Company. The first issue is dated July and it contains 32 
pages of interesting stuff. 

I J* J* 

PERFECT adjustment of the carbureter is indispensible 
to easy starting. Again, the injection of a little paraffin 
into the compression tap will help not a little. 
Jl Jl 

A NOISY gear drive may result from the fact that one cyl- 
inder of a multi-cylinder machine is missing fire. 




AM frequently asked to describe the sensations 
I experience while riding at a speed of a mile a 
minute or better, and I find them very difficult 
to describe, because of the fact that I have never 
experienced like sensations in any two races. I 
will venture to say that the spectator, watching the race, 
feels a much keener thrill than does the rider himself. The 
racer, because of the close application he must give to his 
work, has but little time to devote to analysis of his sen- 
sations. The element of danger, which always accom- 
panies excessive speed, must be entirely overlooked by the 
successful racing man. In my own experience, the idea 
of danger has never appealed to me, until long after that 
danger is past. The ordinary man cannot grasp the idea 
of the tremendous speed at which a rider travels, until he 
realizes that in a single second a racer travels from 88 to 
135 feet. 

Taking the turns at this rate of speed on a saucer track 
requires perfect control. It must be remembered that it 
is a physical impossibility for the rider to steer his ma- 
chine by the handle-bars when going into the turns, for 
here, if ever, he must be a part of his machine and change 
his direction by throwing the weight of his body to one 
side or the other. 

My first thought in a race is to win, and I might say 
it is my only thought. In a recent race in Los Angeles in 
which I was compelled to lap the other contestants, and 
was forced to ride directly into the smoke thrown off by 
their machines, a smoke so dense that I could not see the 
other riders. I confess I wondered for a moment where 
I would land if one of them got in the way, for there is 
no stopping a racing machine, until it hits something or 
the engine runs down; for there is no brake. 

I believe that the rule requiring a rider to pass another 
on the right unless there is sufficient room on the pole, is 
a dangerous provision, and I know it prevents much 
higher speed being attained. This rule should be changed 
so as to compel a rider to pass another on the right at all 
times. For example, with three riders on the track, two 
going a mile a minute and one going about ten seconds 
faster, one of the mile a minute riders riding on the pole 
line, and the other man almost at the top of the track. 
Imagine the doubt in the mind of the faster man trying 
to go by, not knowing when the man at the top of track will 
make up his mind to try to come down to the pole. I also 
believe that a man who rides higher on the track than is 
necessary should be disqualified. 

Jl Jl 

AN English expert lists among the most urgent require- 
ments of the ambitious rider the following: More effi- 
cient mud-guards, combination of the gear drive with the 
two-speed gear, thus doing away with the pedalling gear; 
improved lubrication, specifically by means of a pump main- 
taining a constant level of oil in the crank case; perfectly 
oil-tight crank cases; automatic carburation, fixed ignition, 
lightness and absolute simplicity. 

Jl Jl 

THE next regular meeting of the Motorcycle Manufac- 
turers' Association will be held at the New Southern 
Hotel, August 6 at 10 a. m. Among other things, action 
will be taken on the death of F. C. Robie, who was secre- 
tary of the organization. 

Jl Jl 

NOW and then a machine refuses to take the required 
volume of air. This may be due to a partial stoppage in 
the jet or gasoline pipe, or to the fact that the gauze in 
the carbureter is choked up. 



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August 1, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 

BELL'S REMARKABLE "KILLING." A PRODIGY OF ENDURANCE. 



29 




WALTER BELL was the star of the race meet at Court- 
land Beach track, Omaha, Neb., Sunday afternoon, 
the 18, entering four races and winning first in all of them, 
them. The track was heavy on account of the recent rains, but 
some fairly good time was made and a large crowd watched the 
contests. The summaries: 

Three-mile chain driven {z l A h.p.). — W. E. Dewey (Indian), 
first; G Rosenberry (Indian), second; C. Mickel (Thor), 
third. Time, 4:26. 

Five-mile (belt driven).— W. Bell (Har ley-Davidson), first; 
R. Bates (Excelsior), second; Kinkenny (Excelsior), third; 
L. Flesher (Merkel), fourth. Time, 6:47. 

Five-mile, open (single-cylinder). — W. Bell (Harley-David- 
son), first; W. E. Dewey (Indian), second; R. Bates (Excel- 
sior), third; T. Berchel (Thor), fourth. Time, 6:45. 

Five-mile, private owners, novice (single-cylinder). — C. 
Rosenberry (Indian), first; A. Westerguard (Merkel), second. 
Time, 7:14. 

Five-mile, open (twin-cylinder). — W. Bell (Indian), first; 
W. E. Dewey (Indian), second; L. Lytle (Indian), third. 
Time, 6:35. 

Ten miles, dealers' team race. — Omaha Bicycle Co.'s team, 
W. Bell (Harley- Davidson), first; W. E. Dewey (Indian), 
second; C. Rosenberry (Indian), third; team score, 45 points. 



CHICAGO ENDURANCE RUN WINNERS. 

Yale Team— W. W. Ingram, S. J. Chubbuck and A. R. 
Oberwegner. 



NOWHERE in the annals of motorcycle races and en- 
durance runs can be found a pluckier, more nervy 
rider than Theo. Schlueter, Jr., a lad of 15. He left San 
Francisco on the annual endurance run of the San Fran- 
cisco Motorcycle Club at 4 o'clock Sunday morning, July 
4, with twenty-five other starters. Schlueter rode a single 
cylinder Excelsior. The run was from San Francisco to 
San Luis Obispo and return, a distance of 500 miles, over 
all kinds of roads and many steep grades. Schlueter 
finished the run with a perfect score, he being the only 
single cylinder rider to make the trip without a penalty. 

Jl Jl 

MINNEAPOLIS TO NEW YORK. 

THE cut below is from a photograph of A. R. Horn and 
P. B. Fillmore, of Minneapolis, Minn., who rode from 
that city to New York, arriving Thursday morning. They 
were mounted on Yales, equipped with M. & W. tires. Horn's 
cyclometer registered 1,73s miles, and two weeks were con- 
sumed in making the trip, as it was more for pleasure than 
anything else. The machines ridden gave excellent results, 
there being no trouble whatever, and only one puncture dur- 
ing the entire distance. The riders came via the same route 
as the Glidden tour, encountering very bad roads in Iowa. 
They were given a good send-off by motorcyclists in the 
various towns through which they passed, and report a splen- 
did trip. Horn is one of the firm of Johnson & Horn, Yale 
agents at Minneapolis. 




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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



Michaelson Winner of 144 Mile Road Race 



ON Friday, July 23, at 7 a. m., ten riders started on the Min- 
neapolis Motorcycle Club's championship race of 144 miles. 
The experiences of the different riders during the contest were 
such to which they may look back with a certain amount of pride, 
because, of the seven riders who finished, each one was in the lead 
at some time during the first half of the race. The course has 
plenty of sand and rough places. 

Of the seven riders who finished, J. M. Michaelson, mounted on a 
6-h.p. double Minneapolis two speed, finished first, in four hours one 
minute, thereby winning the Thiem championship cup, valued at 
$40, which must be won twice for complete ownership. First place 
also brought the lucky rider a pair of Kokomo 
two and three-quarter inch tires. Second place 
was won by Guy W. Webb, mounted on a 
4-h.p. Harley-Davidson, in four hours fifty-one 
minutes, but as he was the first rider to finish 
on a single cylinder machine, he won the 
Wagner championship medal, valued at $25, 
and, as a special prize for single-cylinder ma- 
chines, the Wagner Trophy gold watch fob, 
valued at $25, a pair of M. & W. 2^-inch tires. 
and $10 worth of merchandise, donated by 
James Buchanan. Bert C. Ostrander, on a 
4-h.p. Harley-Davidson, finished third. The 
others to finish were L. D. Wolff, W. Bucholz, 
R. W. Gates and A. Anderson. 



1 







THE following is the summaries of the closed meet held 
under the auspices of the New Jersey Club, at Olympic 
Park, July 17: 

Three miles— Won by Henry Malcolm, 3J4 Excelsior; sec- 
ond, Kenneth F. Moore, 3$4 Excelsior; third, George Reichey, 
3J4 Yale. Time, 7:38. 

Two miles. — Final heat won by Percy Drummond, 5 Indian; 
second, Howard O'Brien, 5 Indian; third, George Reichey, 
5 Indian Time, 3 :op 2/5. 

Unlimited pursuit — Final heat won by Watson Kluczek, 
Harley-Davidson; second, H. Malcolm, 3Y2 Excelsior; third, 
K. Moore, 3# Excelsior; distance, 11 miles. Time, 28:42 2/5. 

Three miles handicap.— Won by Howard Hill (30), 5 In- 
dian; second, Howard O'Brien (scratch), 5 Indian; third, 
George Reichey (20), 5 Indian. Time, 6:20 1/5. 

Five miles, singles.— Won by Watson Kluczek, 4 Harley- 
Davidson; second, Kenneth F. Moore, 3$4 Excelsior ; third, 
W. Stevens, 3# Yale. Time, 11 :4i i/S- 

One mile match.— First heat, standing start, won by How- 
ard O'Brien, 5 Indian; second, Percy Drummond, 5 Indian. 
Time, 1:3s Second heat, flying start, won by O'Brien. 
Time, 1:03. 

* ; ,;-f- 

AURORA, I1L— Harvey Bernard, of the Chicago Motor- 
cycle Club, mounted on a single-cylinder four horse 
power Harley-Davidson machine, carried off first honors 
in the motorcycle race meet held July 24, on the local 
half-mile t#ack. Riding in brilliant form, Bernard won the 
fifty-mile event during the morning in 1:10 3-5. In the 
afternoon events he won the five, ten, fifteen and twenty 
mile races. The fifty-mile race was originally billed for 
100, but was cut down owing to the small field. Summaries: 
Fifty-mile— Bernard, Harley-Davidson, first; Prior, Thor, 
second; time, r:io 3-5. Five-mile— Bernard, Harley-David- 
son, first; Delavan, Thor, second; Fisher, Harley-Davidson, 
third; time, 6:41 2-5. Ten-mile— Bernard, Harley-Davidson, 
first; Fisher, Thor, second; time, 13:5^ Fifteen-mile— 
Bernard, Harley-Davidson, first; Fisher, Thor, second; 
time, 20:42 4-5. Five-mile— Walsh, Harley-Davidson, first; 
Beck, Harley-Davidson, second; time, 8:14. Twenty-mile-»- 
Bernard, -Harley-Davidson, first; Fisher, Harley-Davidson, 
second; Green, M. & M., third; time, 28:04. 



WH. WELLS, on a 5 h. p. Indian, scored perfectly in the 
• recent six days' trials of the English A. C U. Ac- 
cording to the official report, the condition of Wells' mount 
was excellent throughout No renewals except tire fitted. 
Chains gave no trouble. Wells also distinguished himself in 
the record time trials, July 14, on the Brooklands track. He 
made the mile in 55 3-5» securing a certificate for the best 
performance in his class. As a matter of fact, his time was 
the fastest of all 

Jl Jl 

THROUGH the efforts of James Mayo, of 222 Penn 
street, Reading, Pa., R-S general agent for Berks 
County, Pa., a club has been organized there with a mem- 
bership of forty-eight active members. The officers are: 
J. S. Hartman, president; W. G. Schaeffer, vice-president; 
H. C. Becker, secretary; James Mayo, treasurer; G. F. 
Mack, captain; James Mayo, first lieutenant; R. G. Wilson, 
second lieutenant, W. G. Schaeffer, Jas. M. Dunkle, and 
Paul H. Smith, trustees. 

Jl Jl 

A PERMANENT organization of the Peoria, III, club 
was effected at a recent meeting, during which of- 
ficers were elected as follows: Toby Vanbuskirk, president; 
E. R. Shanemeyer, secretary-treasurer; Milton Hitchcock, 
captain of the club runs. The first club run was held last 
Sunday. 

Jl Jl 

CARLOS STORER, Lakewood, O., made remarkable 
time on an Indian between Cleveland and Toledo last 
Wednesday morning, covering 122 miles in three hours and 
10 minutes and lowering by 43 minutes the recent auto 
record set by Mrs. K. R. Otis. 

Jl Jl 

THE New Jersey Club, of Newark, is arranging for a 
big open carnival at Olympic Park on Saturday, 
August 21. Plans are afoot to make the event the Eastern 
Championship meet, and if this is assigned to Newark by 
the F. A. M., it will be a monster affair. 
] Jl Jl 

GEORGE POST has been awarded a gold medal by the 
New Jersey Club, of Newark, for having proposed the 
greatest number of members since January 1. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



31 




ONE RIDER'S IDEAL MOUNT. 

FOR four or five years I have paraded my advocacy of 
higher-powered motorcycles and the magneto ignition. 
Now that these two "mighty good things" are with us — 
and with us to stay — I feel that I am not inconsistent in 
going a step further and giving to the motoring public 
a description of what I would consider my ideal motor- 
cycle. My ideal embodies features of many different 
"makes." Be that as it may, here is what I have "up my 
sleeve," shorn of all refinements: 

Frame— 19-in. loop (Indian style). Wheels— 28-in.; 40 
heavy piano wire spokes. Wheel base — 56 ins. Forks— 
Thor spring fork preferred; second choice, "M. M." spring. 
Gasoline tank — 2# gallons. Motor — Thor, Hedstrom or 
Peugeot. Transmission — Direct from engine to rear 
wheel; shaft preferred (F. N. Big 4, or Pierce); second 
choice, chain from engine to rear wheel by chain some- 
what heavier than the standard roller now being employed. 
Engine — 7-h.p. double cylinder, 4 to 1. Gear — Two-speed, 
with fan attachment. Control— Double-grip ("Light" style 
preferred). Ignition — High tension magneto. Emergency 
band brake operated by Bowden wire and controlled by 
lever from handle bar. Add to these specifications a good 
coaster brake, first-class tires, a reliable carbureter and 
a comfortable saddle, and then decide whether this would 
not be "the" machine for all-around purposes. Give me 
such a machine and I'll make 'em all sit up and take 
notice. If, however, in view of my limited knowledge of 
gasoline engines, the machine I have described has any 
impractical features, I would be pleased to hear from the 
readers of Motorcycle Illustrated. 

D. H. Webster. 
J* JC 

OLD TYPE OF CARBURETER. 

HORACE H. CROW, Warren, Pa.— The wick carbure- 
ter was a feature of very early design in motorcycles. 
It was used on the first pattern Werner and on several 
other makes in the nineties. It was constructed in the fol- 
lowing manner: A separate compartment was arranged 
in or below the gasoline tank, with a feed-pipe or needle- 
valve leading thereto. On a central wire was hung strips 
of flannel, wick, or other absorbent material. The gaso- 
line dripped upon these wicks and was drawn in the form 
of vapor into the inlet pipe, where air was admitted to 
obtain the correct driving mixture for the engine. The 
difficulty in using these carbureters was the same as shown 
in the old surface pattern, namely, the letting in of too 
much gasoline, thus filling the carbureter compartment, 
so that no vapor could be given off from the wick or the 
gasoline surfaces. In some cases we have seen the air 
inlet leading directly to the carbureter — this inlet being, 
of course, adjustable, usually from the top of the tank, and 
it took a lot of experimenting to get the correct level of 
gasoline. The surface carbureter was a marvel of reliabil- 
ity, never gave trouble and always supplied fair power. 
This was merely a fair-sized compartment of the tank, into 
which the gasoline was admitted by a needle valve, and 
turned off when the carbureter was half full. Air was ad- 
mitted through a shaft, also adjustable, and the vapor 
passed directly through the inlet pipe into the engine, 
several gauges being fitted for safety, in case of a fireback, 
due to weakness of the automatic inlet spring. The sur- 



face carbureter still lends itself to experiments, and it's 
performances in the olden days hardly warrant its having 
been discarded — in fact, many a road race in Europe was 
won by the old surface-curbureter, two-cylinder Austrian 
Clement. 

<* <* 

STILL ANOTHER MUFFLER. 

AN English rider contributes to Motorcycle the follow- 
ing description of a muffler which, he declares, is 
proving an effective silencer: Length, 10 ins.; diameter, 
3 3-16 ins.; number of baffles, five; number of holes, first 
plate, twenty-five, % in.; number of holes, other plates, 
fifty, 3-32 in.; size of outlet, i-in. pipe flattened to 5-32 in.; 
cut-out tube, 1 in. There is no back pressure even when 
ascending long hills with throttle nearly wide open. One 
great advantage of this silencer is the ease with which, it 




can be cleaned out. By undoing three nuts at right end 
the whole of the interior can be drawn out without dis- 
turbing the rest of the silencer. The four thin baffles are 
kept in place between end plate and first baffle by pieces 
of tube slipped on to the three stays. 

HOW TO HAVE PLEASANT MOTORCYCLE 
DREAMS. 

ABOUT two years ago I hit upon a very novel scheme 
for a pneumatic pillow: Take an old patched 2 J / 2 -inch 
inner tube, fold and tie it so that you have four widths of 
tubing. Then all you have to do is to blow it up with lung 
pressure, screw on the cap and slip any kind of a pillow 
case over this "pneumatic head rest," and there you are. 
This pillow is very cool and restful on hot summer nights, 
and is guaranteed to produce air-cooled motorcycle dreams 
of the 40-mile per hour variety. 

I noticed what one of our brother F. A. M. men had to 
say about turning out for horse rigs on the highways, his 
idea being to keep in the left hand path until meeting a rig, 
when you simply cross over from the left to right path, this 
giving the horseman or horsewoman the impression that you 
are turning clear out into the corn-field in order to let them 
by. This is certainly a very "nifty" jolly, and generally brings 
a pleasant smile from the driver. I tried this on one of the 
fair sex the other day, and she said: "You are the first sen- 
sible man I have met." Honk! Honk!! 

Mendota, 111. 

F. A. M., No. 306. 



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Motorcyclists !youi 



Mean much to^four 

T\ON'T take chances in the great endurance 
run from Cleveland to Indianapolis. 

You can't tinker with troublesome tires and 
at the controls on tHe minute. 



I 



You can't slow up on rough stretches and pass 

the checking stations on scheduled time. — 

You can't be scared of slipping' tires and 
do your best. 

All of which means that you can't 
start with inferior tires and finish 
with a perfect score. 

And you won't get a medal 
fi nless you do. 




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• 

Tires will 

Score 




Use 
the tires 
that in sim- 
ilar endur- 
ance runs Have 
proven absolutely 
dependable. 

Use the tires that the 
best motorcycle manu- 
facturers Have selected for 
their machines. 

Use the tires that nine riders out 
of every ten Have come to. 
G <SL J Tires will eliminate all tire 
trouble — will let you g'o to the limit re- 
gardless of the road— will g'ive you that 
feeling of safety which means greater speed. 
In a word, start with G <& J's and keep your 
eye on the engine— Make it do the work and G $ 
J's will carry you to victory. 

Get our catalogue now and prepare right for 
the big meet. It shows not only the best tires but 
the best accessories too. Write today to 

G &6 J TIRE COMPANY 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

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Many a hair-raising finish of tf\ 
in the tires the winners are ordering. 

What good is a powerful motor am 

What good is a steadfast nerve 

You doubtless have both. W hy tisi 

Equip your machine with Indiana} 
any "ifs" on the tire question. 

G & J Tires have the speed. The 
they are the least liable to skid. In other wo 

1 hese are not idle claims — but fact 

It's economy to get the very best ti\ 
valuable you can't afford to let an inferior tin 

Again let us say— Equip your Motoi 



G&JTI 







•*- -. -- 



G & J Motorcycle Tire 

The Fastest Motorcycle Tire Made 




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§ is the tire 




Winners use 

lung National F. A. M. Race Meet is being decided right now in the supplies-^- 

f machine with tires that blow out? 

pr tires cannot be depended upon ? 

\ng their value and the races you enter by using any but the best tires ? 

\ G & J Tires and, after the prizes are awarded, you at least won't have 

[ the most resilient Motorcycle tires made. They can't slip off the rim and 
they can be relied upon to do their part to bring you to victory. 

wen again and again by riders who have broken many world's records. 

always— especially on such an occasion as this, as most of the prizes will be so 
m7 your chances. 

tie with Indianapolis G&J Tires and go in to win. 



\E CO. 9 Indianopolis, Ind. 



l^SS^WSgE; 




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36 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



* ^ ' 





M» 










IN CLUB CIRCLES 














A Group of Members of the Harley- Davidson Club of Auburn, N. Y. 




MEMBERS of the Worcester club think tarvia roads are 
tine sometimes, but not always. They struck a lot 
of roads down Boston way, on the 18th, on which tarvia 
had been spread within a day or two. They affirm the 
folks down that way didn't put enough sand on top to take 
up the surplus tarvia. The result was the wheels of their 
machines took up a goodly portion of it. It felt to the 
riders as if they took up several tons, but with tarvia for 
footing in case they dismounted, they decided to let it go 
at a gues>. 

It was the first reliability run of the club, and eight went 
the route from Worcester to Boston and back again. Three 
more started, including First Lieut. William H. Tanner- 
bring, who made a perfect score in the club runs last sea- 
son- But Shrewsbury was his limit this time. It is said 
that the "reason" was an exceedingly comely miss. 

The riders started from the lake clubhouse at 9:30. The 
party which made the run consisted of Capt. L. J. Vaud- 
reuil, E. R. Creamer, Casper M. Brown, Robert C. Kendall, 
Albert V. Amsden. Howard Clark, A. E. Darling and Ar- 
thur W. Lindberg. 

THE Detroit club has closed a contract with the Michigan 
State Fair management to hold races Sept 3, during the 
second day of the fall exposition. Roy Hunter, president 
of the club, hopes that this event will attract many celebrated 
riders. The State Fair management has agreed to give $500 
towards purchasing prizes, and others will be solicited from 
manufacturers throughout the country. The club itself will 
present a $50 watch. It is planned to give some prizes to 
even' man who enters the races, even though he finishes last 

SYRACUSE, N Y. — Unfavorable weather conditions on 
the 18th spoiled what would otherwise have been a 
delightful day's outing for the members of the Syracuse 
Club. Captain George Fenner had arranged for a turtle 
dinner at Little York Lake, thirty miles from Syracuse. 



Several times they had to stop under trees for protection. 
The route was through Lafayette and Tully to the lake. 
Owing, however, to an hour's heavy rain, accompanied by 
hail, the turtle dinners were untouched. 

At a recent meeting the club decided to give up its rooms 
and garage on the outskirts for a centrally located lodge 
room downtown, in order that the club may prosper dur- 
ing the winter months. Wesley B. Shane resigned as 
captain and First Lieutenant George Fenner succeeded 
him. A. V. Brewster advanced to the first lieutenancy. 

Some of the riders have recently discovered to their sor- 
row that there is an officer at each end of a bridge at 
Owasco Lake, backed up by a justice of the peace, who 
exacts a fine of $5 to $15 for crossing the bridge in excess 
of four miles an hour. 

& J* 

ONE of the most successful runs conducted by the Na- 
tional Capital Club took place last Sunday, over 
thirty riders participating. The destination was Great 
Falls, where dinner was had. This is one of the clubs 
which prohibits its members, while on a club run, from 
scorching or using the muffler cut-outs. 

THE picture at the top of this page is that of a section of 
the membership of the Harley-Davidson Club, of Au- 
burn, N. Y., recently organized by H. H. Pullman. Those 
shown in the photograph are W. J. Aldrich, L. C. Devendorf, 
G. L Wilder, S. C. Cooper, Seward Case, Carl S. Cooper, 
Joseph Cuskey and H. H. Pullman. 

AN installation of the following new officers of the Los 
Angeles Club took place recently: President, E. C. 
Kehl; vice-president, C. L. Hafer; secretary, H. White; 
treasurer, J. A. Scott. 

Plans are now under way for the construction of a 
$2,500 home for the Minneapolis Club. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



37 



AN OPPORTUNITY FOR THE F. A. M. 

SOME TIME in September a conference on the prepara- 
tion of a proposed uniform motor vehicle law for New 
York and the New England States will be held at the head- 
quarters of the Automobile Club of America. It is planned 
to invite the governors of these states to appoint repre- 
sentative members of the various legislatures as delegates 
to the conference. They will be expected to prepare one or 
more drafts of measures which they regard as likely to be 
acceptable by their constituencies. When an agreement 
has been reached, the provisions of the measure determined 
upon will be communicated to Washington for considera- 
tion at the conference on uniform laws, called by President 
Taft for December or January. It will be wise for the 
F. A M., whose convention is held at a most opportune 
time, to appoint a committee to get in touch with the pro- 
motors of the suggested uniform system of motor vehicle 
legislation. In fact, the Federation cannot afford to be un- 
represented at these important conferences. The law 
symposium, recently published in this paper, reveals so 
many possibilities of trouble in the near future, that the 
prospect of securing uniformity in legislation in the north- 
eastern States and, thereafter, probably throughout the 
Union, is so good that the- motorcycling fraternity should 
make certain that the nature of its interests are officially brought 
to the attention of the conferees. This is a most important 
matter, and it should not be overlooked by the Indianapolis 
convention. 




CjKfcVULjyfD Boy's Q*i^Cetf7V*f Hvf. 

S 



CLEVELAND. — The picture shows, a few members of 
the Cleveland Motorcycle Club on tour, the camera 
having been snapped at Elyria. George B. Knapp, who 
sends us the photograph, states that motorcycling is taking 
on much activity in Cleveland, one of the symptoms being 
the formation of the club. Mr. Knapp is agent for the 
Wagner, and is doing very well with the 3l/ 2 H.P. tourist 
models. 



Not one, but five styles of wrenches, especially designed 
for motorcycle use, are manufactured by the Coes Wrench 
Company, of Worcester, Mass. The firm is a hundred 
years old and has been manufacturers of wrenches for de- 
cades. Its reputation as wrench makers is world wide. 



Noting the growth of motorcycling, this concern has de- 
signed five styles especially for motorcycle use. The com- 
pany's advertisement in this issue hints at the various makes. 
Besides, there's a catalogue, a mine of information on 
wrenches. Get it. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



A Page. 

Auto-Bi Co 7* 

Aurora Automatic Machinery Co 47-49 

American Motor Co 62-63 

American Belting & Tanning Co 76 

American Motor Cycle Co 80 

B 

Bosch Magneto Co Cover IV 

Badger Brass Mfg. Co 75 

Breeze Carbureter Co 79 

Bnshnell & Cannon 79 

c 

Corbin Screw Corporation 41 

Coes Wrench Co S7 

Crouch Motor Co 71 

Consolidated Mfg. Co 51 

D 

Diamond Chain ft Mfg. Co 78 

• E 

Empire Tire Co 65 

Excelsior Supply Co 38-39 

Eclipse Machine Co 66 

Emblem Mfg. Co 71 

F 

F. A. M 79 

G 

G ft J Tire Co 3**33-34-35 •»<* 80 

Oossman Co., Emil 74 

Goodyear Tire ft Rubber Co 67 

Goodrich Co.. B. F Cover III 



H Page 

Harley-Davidson Motor Co 58 

Heitger Carbureter Co 78 

Hendee Manufacturing Co Front Cover 

Heath & Co., S. F 78 

Hornecker Motor Mfg. Co 80 

Hansen Mfg. Co., O. C 79 

Herring-Curtiss Co 69 

J 

Jeffrey ft DeWitt 56 

Jones Speedometer Co 60 

Jenkins, Geo. P 80 

K 

Kokomo Rubber Co 68 

Karl ft Co., Adolf 79 

Lyons Motor Co., Geo. V 80 

M 

Morgan & Wright 52-53 

Minneapolis Motorcycle Co 76 

Merkel-Light Motor Co 73 

Majestic Mfg. Co 77 

Mesinger Mfg. Co., H. & F 44 

McLaughlin & Ashley 80 

Morrison-Ricker Mfg. Co 78 

Motorcycle Equipment Co 78 

Miami Cycle ft Mfg. Co 61 

Mart, The 54 

N 

New Departure Mfg. Co Cover II 

N. S. U. Motor Co 59 and 75 

New Era Gas Engine Co 79 



O P*gc 

Ovington Motor Co 54 

P 

Pierce Cycle Co 64 

Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory 77 

Persons Mfg. Co 77 

Prospect Motor Co 80 

Prest-OLite Co 73 

Pittsfield Spark Coil Co 70 

R 

Reading Standard Co 42-43 

Rose Mfg. Co 74 

Reliance Motor Cycle Co 70 

Royal Motor Works, Inc 55 

s 

Sheppard, W. S 78 

Splitdorf, C. F 46 

Shaw Mfg. Co 78 

Standard Thermometer Co 76 

Shaler ft Co 55 

T 

Tingley ft Co., Chas. 80 

Troxel Mfg. Co 72 

Thiem Mfg. Co 80 

Tiger Cycle Works Co 46 

V 

Veeder Mfg. Co 77 

w 

Whipple, I. H 79 

Widmayer Co., F. B 79 



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UAOJTMMmSELIE 





The Triumph oi Scientific Construction 

Note the clean cut, Straight line frame with low hung Motor, low 
comfortable saddle position and generally business-like design. No 
weak and unsightly bends in the tubing but double triangle construc- 
tion throughout; the strongest form known to mechanics. Note the 
double, independent adjustment of belt and chain. Adjust the belt 
by setting the rear wheel in the extra long rear fork slots and then 
adjust the chain by means of the eccentric hanger. This is a vital 
point. 

Note the tension idler that increases the traction of the belt with- 
out materially increasing the strain on the belt and bearings. 

These are some of the points that have made 

THE EXCELSIOR AUTO-CYCLE 

The one that makes good every time, • 

EXCELSIOR SUPPLY CO. 

Established 1876 

233-37 RANDOLPH STREET - - - CHICAGO, ILL. 



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LAAOnrcilMIESKBILIE 





THE. POWER 

MOTORCYCLE 

Lies in the 

ENGINE 




THE 

EXCELSIOR 

is the 

MOST 
POWERFUL 

SINGLE 

CYLINDER 

MOTOR 

Ever put in 
a Motorcycle 

NOTE the large perfectly adjusted valves with direct acting valve lift. 

NOTE the quality and finish of the cylinder castings; the perfectly balanced 
and ground piston with three rings, ground on both sides and face. 

NOTE the positive, sight feed oiling system that always delivers clean, fresh 
oil to every moving part and leaves nothing to chance. 

NOTE the valve and ignition gears with fixed relation between valve action 
and spark, thus precluding the possibility of the motor getting M Out of Tune/* 

NOTE the oil tight crank case and breathing tube for equalizing the crank 
case pressure without allowing the oil to be thrown out on the machine or 
rider. 

Then NOTE the power and steadiness of running without noise or vibra- 
tion and its positive reliability and dependability 

ALL THE TIME AND EVERYWHERE. 

EXCELSIOR SUPPLY CO. 

Established 1876 

233-37 RANDOLPH STREET - CHICAGO, ILL. 

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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



A "NIFTY" SIDE CAR— THE VEEDER COMPANY'S NEW CYCLOMETER 

THE photograph published herewith is 
of the N. S. U. 6 h.p. Model de 
Luxe, with two-cylinder engine measur- 
ing 75M bore by 90M stroke, which pro- 
vides ample power for pulling the side- 
car attached, and for which this model 
is specially adapted. The engine, which 
is very low in the frame, has mechan- 
ically operated inlet valves, worked by 
overhead rockers, and the front cylinder 
in a more inclined position forward than 
on most twins, which permits of cold air 
reaching the rear cylinder for cooling 
purposes. The magneto is in a well pro- 
tected position behind the crank-case, 
and is gear driven. New pattern spring 
forks and extra long handle bars are 
fitted. The wheel-base measures about 
60 inches. The stand and luggage carrier 
form part of the standard equipment, in 
addition to a very neat metal hood case 
fixed in the frame under the saddle. A great convenience 
when dealing with tire trouble on the rear wheel is the 
removable mudguard, which may be completely detached, 
leaving the wheel entirely exposed. The N. S. U. two- 
speed gear and free engine clutch are fitted on the engine 




shaft and operated by a convenient lever on the top tube. 
For those who prefer it, the gear can be fitted in the rear 
wheel. A fan insures the engine keeping cool when the 
low gear is used for hill climbing. The car is of the rigid 
variety and substantial. The seat is coach built. 



The Veeder Mfg. Co., of Hartford, Conn., has recently 
placed on the market a type of cyclometer which is espe- 
cially adapted for motorcycles. Small attachments used on 
motorcycles are subjected to very hard usage, and it is with 
this knowledge that the new motorcycle trip cyclometer 
has been constructed. 

The case is increased in size, the gearing is heavier, and 
the device is equipped with a larger star wheel and motor- 
cycle striker, with the adjustable bracket, which is regularly 
supplied. 

The adjustable bracket is a feature which deserves spe- 
cial mention. This bracket can, by simply loosening one 
nut, be made to fit any American or foreign motorcycle. 
This can be readily appreciated by the dealer who before 
has been obliged to stock with special attaching fixtures 
for various makes of motorcycles. 

The mile figures are in white with black background, the 
tenths of miles in red, black background. With this com- 
bination of color the rider can easily distinguish from the 
seat the reading of his cyclometer at all times. The retail 
price pf this instrument is $3.00. 

the Eclipse Machine Company, Elmira, N. Y., 
announces that while it intends to continue manufacturing the 
Eclipse motorcycle coaster brake in its present form it 
will also bring out a model de luxe, which will be made 
larger and heavier, and will be designed especially for use 
on double cylinder, high-power machines. The new and 
heavy Eclipse coaster brake will measure 6>g ins. from out 
to out of cones, whereas the present model measures 5^ 
ins. The present model has been very successful and has 
given satisfaction to users. There is demand, however, for 
a larger and heavier brake, and the company proposes to 
meet that demand with its new model. 
J* # 

In the production of Standard speedometers the Parker 
Manufacturing Company has been succeeded by the Stand- 
ard Thermometer Company, whose address is 65 Shirley 
street, Boston, Mass. The high-class work done by the 
Parker Company will be continued and improved upon by its 
successor. 

«* J* 

It is more than likely that the creditors of the 20th Cen- 
tury Mfg. Company will accept twenty-five cents on the 
dollar on their claims. This company had long been lamp 



manufacturers at 17 Warren street, New York. Through 
their attorneys, McLaughlin, Russell, Coe & Sprague, 165 
Broadway, they are offering creditors 25 per cent., payable 
in ten days. 

JC «* 

A rubber concern of national repute, after months of 
preparation, is about ready to enter the motorcycle tire field. 
In fact, a few makers have already received samples of 
the new tires for trial purposes. The concern, which is 
located in New England, is capitalized in the millions and 
is certain to be a big factor in the motorcycle industry, as 
it already is in the automobile field. 

Princeton, 111. — The Bureau County Independent Tele- 
phone Company is planning to supply each exchange office 
throughout the county with a motorcycle for the use of 
the "trouble chaser." A Harley-Davidson machine has been 
purchased for the Princeton office and some of the others 
will be similarly equipped as soon as possible. 

The Hafer Automobile Company, of Joplin, Mo., and the 
Peter M. Adams Company, of Stevens Point, Wis., have 
taken Harley-Davidson agencies. 

H. T. Roberts, formerly with the Consolidated Manufac- 
turing Company, has joined the travelling staff of the 
Harley-Davidson Company. 

Auburn, N. Y. — Herbert H. Pullman, local Harley- 
Davidson agent, wants catalogues from makers of equip- 
ment and parts, of which he intends to carry a fair-sized 
stock. 

Morgan & Wright report a rapidly increasing sale on 
their closed end or butt end type of tube. It has become 
very popular with tourists and on endurance runs. 

Clinton, Iowa. — A. T. Skelley and J. L. Pettingrew are 
New Era agents here. 

«£• «£• 

Indian literature has another increase in the form of a 
house-organ gotten out by L. J. Mueller, of 6417 Woodland 
avenue, Cleveland. It is called the "Flaming Arrow" and 
all good Indians will want to read it 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



41 



YOUR SAFETY IS ASSURED 



IF YOUR MACHINE, ALL THINGS 

ELSE BEING EQUAL, IS FITTED 

WITH A CORBIN BRAKE 



DOUBLE THE BRAKING 

SURFACE 
OF ANY OTHER MODEL 



DURABLE, SIMPLE AND POSITIVE, THE 

CORBIN SPELLS RELIABILITY 



MAKE YOUR 
MOTORCYCLE 

UP-TO-DATE 




1 1 



just m 

A CORBIN and 
FEEL SECURE 



FOR EITHER CHAIN OR BELT 



COMPLETE CATALOGUE ON REQUEST 



OUR BRAKES ARE BUILT 

THROUGHOUT 
FOR MOTORCYCLE USE 



WE ARE LICENSED COASTER 
BRAKE MANUFACTURERS 



WE MAKE THEM AT NEW BRITAIN, CONN., 
AND SELL THEM EVERYWHERE 



Corbin Screw Corporation 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



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42 



i 



f 



.♦* 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



^ l l&l O l^lOl^l^l^l^l^l^ l ^^ ^ '^^")^'^'^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^"^"^ 1 ^ 1 & —$>•> $ • & • < ♦- l >.|^» ^N>^»f 




MODELS 

Single and Twin 
Cylinder. 

Mechanical 
Intake Valve. 

Motors from 3 to 
7 Horse Power. 

Battery and 
Mag'neto 
Ignition. 

Chain and Belt 
Drive. 



Tricars, 

Delivery Cars, 

Chair Fore Cars, 

Tandems, 

Tricycles, 

Etc. 




R-S MOTO 



£ tf. 



AIS/1 



Built and Tested in the Mountains 




King of Hill 

It Climbed 



MODEL NO. 1, 3-3i/ 2 H.P. 



Its Stock Machines won many Victories, defeatin 

Power, Strength, Speed, Simplicity and 
—which with other exclusive and 




the most practical ma 

Live Agents wanted in unoccupied territory. 



READING ST 

Bingaman and Water Streets 



i • .♦*♦.•.»*•.#.»*•.# A mt^MM 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



43 



^**W*&+4fr+ , $ • ' $ ■• ♦ '•' Q • frfr • $ 9 « fr •>$' • <$ •'♦ »Q ■■^■•■fri» Q i»i fl ' »$ l ■ $'»$ ■ " •'^■ i ^I^ I ^H I^I ( ^ l ^ |i^» ^ » fri «i fr • fr ■ • ♦' • '^ • ft • ^ > 



RCYCLES 




No Limit to Speed but the Law 



limbers 

Pike's Peak 




MODEL NO. 4, 7 H.F. 



Specials and Racing Machines ridden by Experts 

Economy are the distinguishing marks 
progressive features make the 




hine for universal use 

Write for catalogue and information to 



AND ARD CO. 



READING, PA. 




FEATURES 

R-S Spring Fork. 

R-S Transmis- 
sion with Inde- 
pendent Chain 
Adjustment. 

R-S Double Grip 
Control. 

R-S Frame 
Construction. 

R-S Muffler. 

R-S Compensat- 
ing' Sprocket. 

R-S Oiling' 
Device. 

R-S Automatic 
Cut Out JSwitch. 

R-S Gasoline and 

Oil Tank, 

Etc. 




^•^^♦.•^♦♦.•^♦.•^•♦.^♦^•^•.♦♦^•^ 



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44 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



COMFORT and 
ENDURANCE 




"CAVALRY" No. 3 

(PATENTED.) 



Are two of the Qualities which have so wonderfully popularized 

MESINGER MOTORCYCLE SADDLES 

That is why most of the Two, Three and Four Cylinder Machines are 
equipped with Mesinger Cavalry Type Motor Saddles. They have the Right 
Shape for Comfort and have Fibre Friction Shock Absorbers. 

The Mesinger Cavalry Saddle is made like a horse saddle — it prevents you 
from slipping and avoids that crampish hold of the hands on the handle-bar. 

No Machine Can Give Satisfaction Unless the Saddle Be Right 



Investigate the Mesin- 
ger Fibre Friction Shock 
Absorber, which check 
the Rebound and prevent 

the Sidesway. 



There is little differ- 
ence in the price, but a 
large difference in Com- 
fort, between the Mesin- 
ger and the others. 



Consider : If you insist 
you can have the Mesin- 
ger Cavalry or Standard 
specified as equipment 
without extra charge. 



THE BEST FOR LONG DISTANCE 

Whether used for Touring Purposes or 
merely riding in the vicinity of your home, 
The Mesinger saddle always satisfies. It 
is honest value. It is the result of many 
years* experience in the manufacture of 
motorcycle saddles. 

H. 6 F. MESINGER 

MFG. COMPANY 

1801-1803 First Avenue, New York 

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CAVALRY" No. 5 
PATENTED 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



45 




THE STANDARD VERY POPULAR. 

The Standard Speedometer, which was put on the market 
last winter, seems to have made a hit with both the riders 
and the trade. As evidence of its popularity, it is being 
used by motorcycle police of several cities, among them 
the metropolitan police in and near Boston and the police 
of St. Louis. Motorcycle Patrolman Lee A. Ferguson, 
who has had a great deal of experience with both motor- 
cycles and speedometers, says that the Standard is the best 
he ever rode behind. 

The principle of this instrument is entirely different from 
any other. It is a centrifugal governor, made with two 
weights, opposed to each other, which slide in and out 
from the center, on a small cross rod, instead of swinging 
on pivots. The arrangement of the sliding weights makes 
the instrument perfectly steady. It is also of such durable 
construction that the intense vibration on the handle bars 
does not effect its accuracy. Attachments for all the differ- 
ent makes of machines have been perfected, so that it is a 
matter of but a few minutes to fit a Standard to any make 
of machine. 

The Standard is manufactured by The Standard Thermome- 
ter Co., 65 Shirley street, Boston. 
1* # 

NEW MACHINE AT F. A. M. MEET. 

The attention of cur readers is called to the fact that the 
Miami Cycle and Manufacturing Company, of Middletown, 
O., one of the oldest and most substantial concerns in the 
country, announces in the advertising pages of this issue 
that the 1910 model of the Racycle motorcycle, a new ma- 
chine, will be ready for competition in the F. A. M. En- 
durance Run. This machine will be a 4 h. p., single cylinder 
belt drive, equipped with the new Musselman coaster brake, 
the engine being upright and well forward in the frame, 
the wheels to be either 26 or 28 ins., at the option of the 
purchaser. The manufacturers will also make this model 
for chain drive, and furnish it either with or without mag- 
neto. It will have double grip control. A new spring fork, 
and large capacity for both the oil and gasoline, with an 
emergency reserve gasoline tank, and 2^2-in. tires, are other 
features. The concern has been long and favorably known by 
the motorcycle trade and their machine is certain to excite 
keen interest among agents and riders. The specifications of 
the Musselman brake are as follows: 

Cooling flanges which add over 13% square inches of cool- 
ing surface, making the total surface 42 square inches. A 
very large brake shoe, 
giving a total of 15 
square inches applied 
on the inner surface of 
the shell under the 
cooling flanges. A %- 
inch pitch. This gives 
one as good a leverage 
in applying the brake 
as a lifting jack. A 
large axle. 9-16 inch 
in diameter. No arm, 
thus causing the pres- 
sure, when brake is applied, of an end pull on rear forks and 
end push on the- rear stays. A grease chamber, surrounded 
by the braking shoe. This chamber holds sufficient grease 



USED TO DELIVER CREAM. 



White Cross Dairy 
Company, of New York, 
Finds that R. S. Delivery 
Van Renders Very Effi- 
cient Service. 





— 


(■LA 




tffijSv ^ 


^ -1 



■r 




THE innovation recently started in New York by The 
White Cross Dairy Company promises to become a 
permanent institution. The above company has placed 
on the streets of the metropolis for the delivery of the 
half-pint bottles of cream, a Reading-Standard non-con- 
vertible delivery van, specially constructed for the purpose. 
This vehicle is enameled white, with red trimmings. The 
van is 22 ins. by 24 ins. by 36 ins., and is propelled by a 
3^-h.p. R.-S. motor. 



for keeping the hub automatically lubricated for a season. 

The sprocket set is fitted with two chain line rings; these, 

with the straight and 
offset sprocket, will 
give seven chain lines, 
running from 2% 
inches to 2y 2 inches, 
making it unnecessary 
to order special hubs 
for certain motor- 
cycles. >8-inch steel 
balls are used 
throughout, also long, 
strong axle nuts, built 
so as to accommodate 

any kind of stand. The principle of this brake is the same 

as the Musselman Bicycle Coaster Brake, which allows the 

hub to run perfectly free at all times. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED August 1, 1909. 

A SPRINTER OF THE GENTLER SEX. 



782,8th Ave., New York City 

Off Leon Ling Fame 

Is to-day the best known address in the world 
That is Our Address 

THE TIGER CYCLE WORKS CO. 

Distributors of the 

PIONEER and RELIANCE MOTORCYCLES 

Large Stock of Second Hand Machines (all makes) 
Full Assortment of Parts, Supplies and Specialties 

Son J Stamp for Catalogue H. A, QLIESMAN, Prop. 



You wouldn't be without a 

SPLITDORF 
Motorcylce f Plug 



WILL OUTLAST YOUR MOTOR 



tOFP&n **»*!>» est o, 



one day if you knew 
the satisfaction it gives 
to other motorcyclists. 

This Plug is designed 
especially to meet con- 
ditions that exist only 
in motorcycle engines, 
and its wide adoption 
by the leading makers 

5 T *G«.< t T and riders is a pretty 
safe indication of its 

*V V merit 



Put one in your engine on your next ride and note the perfect ignition 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Walton Ave. and 138th St. 

Branch, 1679 Broadway 




iM»U COMP«L$$IOM 



New York 



NEW EDITION— JUST OUT 

"CONSTRUCTION. MANAGEMENT AND CURE OF MOTORCYCLES*' 

Revised and Enlarged— 60 Pages. 25 Cents 

Contents. — The Motor, Mechanical Valves, Working 
of Valves, General Motor Parts, Twin Cylinder Motors, 
Motor Tips, Removing and Replacing Cylinder, Over- 
heating, Piston Rings, Knocking and Pounding, Timing, 
Weak Springs, Life of Motors, Care of Valves, Lubri- 
cation, Ignition, Ignition Troubles, Trouble Chart, Mag- 
netos, Carburetor, Transmission, Spring Forks, Tires, 
Two Speed, Attachable Outfits, Belt Don'ts, Other 
Dont's, Cause of Breakdowns, Points to Remember. 

MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO.. 2ff BmdWiy, Hew Yst 







, 








isr a^^^H 




"""^JMP 




P^"^C 


arm 


■ Js^B^Li^B^Ci 


■ _*^^g^ 


mttr^' 





This photo was taken on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. 
It is that of a great enthusiast of the gentler sex, Miss Florine 
Travis, mounted on a Thor racing machine. 

An English rider contributes to Motor Cycle the follow- 
ing suggestions with a view to solving the much-mooted 
stock-racing machine controversy: "Pick from a maker's 
stock of not less than ten (to prevent the building of sev- 
eral fakes) two machines at random, and seal and com- 
pete with tools and the usual touring spares. At the com- 
petition, the machines would be unsealed and handed over, 
one to the trade rider chosen by the makers, and one to 
an amateur, and these riders would be allowed one hour, 
in full view of the judges and the public, in which to tune 
up and test the machines. Riders should bring no tools 
or duplicates, and remove nothing from the machines. 
The competition would then take place and would prob- 
ably be divided into three sections. First, trade riders; 
second, amateur riders mounted on the same machines the 
trade riders have just used; amateur riders on the other 
machines." 

To keep a leather belt in proper working condition, the 
rider should scrape it now and then with an old knife, in 
order to remove from the belt all particles of dirt and 
grit. A periodical dressing with oil is also necessary. 

1* # 

This appears to be a motor boat. As a matter of fact, it 
is a boat, but, instead .of going on water, it is made to run 
on land. On July 5 there was a motorcycle parade in Pitts- 
field, Mass., and this picture shows Dr. Archie Boudreau 
seated in the decorated boat which he built around his F. N. 
Big Four, to participate in the parade. Dr. Boudreau won 
the first prize, a handsome cup valued at not less than $100. 




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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



47 




ii 



Designed and made by men who have for nine years 
produced what is best for a Motorcycle and the Motor- 
cyclist. This brake is always ready to perform the work. 
The brake you can depend upon when danger ahead 
presents itself. That's why so many leading Motorcycle 
Makers have adopted it, and why thousands of riders 
demand and use it. 



Aurora Automatic Machinery Co. 

LICENSED COASTER BRAKE MANUFACTURERS 

1307 Michigan Avenue, Chicago 

10 > # • Q • ft »' ft »' ft • ' ft »»' ft l »' ft '« ' ft '« ' ft '* ft -»«S— ft -«' ft - »ft '»' ft l l j ll ft • ft • ft »' ft • ft • i j ll Q ■ { »>♦«« $ « •■ ft .». ft .«. ft .«.ft^ ft '»i ft .«.ft » ft » ft » ft .« ft ■ ft » * 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



ACTIVITIES OF MANUFACTURERS AND AGENTS 




This is the Sidecar which Whipple, the Motorcycle Man 
of Chicago, has had in constant use for six seasons. The 
engine has never been taken apart, nor have any of the 
bearings been renewed. In addition to two persons it 
usually carries merchandise, and quite often its freight has 
been as many as three persons. It is needless to add that 
Whipple knows how to take care of a machine, otherwise 
such remarkable serviceability would never have been 
secured. 

The Corbin Screw Corporation, of New Britain, Con- 
necticut, practically the pioneers of the coaster brake in- 
dustry, will this year place on the market a motorcycle 
band brake, Model No. it. The success of this company 
during the past season with its Models 9 and Q-A was un- 
precedented. The combining of the practical ideas of the 
concern's inventive force has resulted in the perfection of a 
band brake, which, it is anticipated, will be greatly in de- 
mand by motorcycle manufacturers. 

The Corbin Coaster Brake and Two-Speed Brake arc 
known throughout the country and, with the addition of the 
band brake, the line will be practically complete. The 
company manufactures also an extensive line of motor- 
cycle and automobile parts and, owing to the increased 
demand for this class of product, the Corbin people are 
obliged to erect a large addition to their plant. 

The Chicago endurance run was certainly a gruelling 
contest, designed to test the men and to severely try the 
machines. It was a 600-mile run, 200 a day. The Yale team 
won the highest honors possible, three perfect scores and 
the team trophy, which was awarded them because, at the 
finish, their machines were best fitted for further services. 
To score a record of that sort in such an event spells ma- 
terial and design and workmanship, the whole equaling 
and meaning dependability. The Consolidated Manufac- 
turing Company is talking large about this Yale victory; 
and they are justified in doing so. 

C. L. Waters is manager and principal stockholder of the 
Marvel Motorcycle Company, recently incorporated to 
do business at Hammondsport, N. Y. The capital stock is 
$50,000. In announcing the incorporation of the new com- 
pany, Mr. Waters said to a representative of this paper: 

"I found my business, that of the Motorcycle Equipment 
and Supply Company, increasing so rapidly that I needed 
additional capital and incorporated with a view of selling 
stock. Mr. G. H. Curtiss, being some time ago interested 



with me in the motorcycle business, gladly consented to 
act as an incorporator and director. He has not severed 
his connections with the Herring-Curtiss Company, and his 
small connection with this company in no way effects his 
other interests. Mr. C. P. Rudd, one of the stockholders, 
will be superintendent. We have 500 motorcycles under 
other interests. Mr. C. P. Rudd, one of the stockholders, 
now building a 115x30 feet two-story addition, and plans 
are being perfected for a big increase in business. 

"The Motorcycle Equipment & Supply Company will be 
known as the Motorcycle Equipment Company. The 
amount of business this company is now doing will sur- 
prise you. We keep three men busy shipping goods to all 
parts of America and Canada. The name "Marvel" is used 
because the new motorcycle will be a wonder. Nothing 
we have been able to coax to go up against it has anywhere 
equalled it for power per cylinder capacity." 
J* J* 

Work has been started on the 90x120 addition to the 
Harley-Davidson plant, at Milwaukee, Wis. They have just 
established the following agencies: Harry E. McAfee, 
Greely, Colo.; H. O. Oleans, Iola, Wis.; Joseph Stack, 
Spokane, Wash.; Joseph Miller, Burlington, Iowa; Motor- 
cycle & Bicycle Equipment Co., Seattle, Wash.; L. H. 
Skinner, Colorado Springs, Colo., and the Whitney-Becker 
Motor Co., Denver, Colo. 

Gary, Ind. — The Harley-Davidson machine is in the 
hands of an enterprising agency here, that of Sax & Sav- 
age, of 585 Broadway. These H.-D. representatives are 
securing good returns from a lively campaign of local 
newspaper publicity. 

1* # 

Morgan & Wright offer the trade a new motorcycle grip, 
in both the long and short styles. They claim that the 
knob on the end affords a secure hold and an easy position 
for the wrist. 

J* 1* 

The Pacific Sales Corporation, 50 Van Ness avenue, San 
Francisco, now represents the Emil Grossman company 
on the Pacific Coast. 




J. S. TORMEY, THOR SALES AGENT. 



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August 1, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 49 



twe. MoIorCyci£- 

imreme 




NOTATHOf 



^&i£i "fee a Tr&tfer* 



9* 



Over the Santa Cruz Mountains, up the long, steep San Juan 
grade, Thor left the trailers in the 

Greatest of All EnduranceTests 

A 2 days run 500 miles 

21 starters, 15 fell by the wayside Only 5 perfect scores 

3 Thors started 3 Thors finished 
3 Thor SCORES WHICH ARE PERFECT SCORES 

It's on the road you ride your motorcycle, and it's here where 

Thor IS SUPREME 

It takes a Thor to catch a Thor 

Aurora Automatic Machinery Company 

1307 MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 

DISTRIBUTORS 

A. FREED. Saa Francisco and Los An«alas FRED. WILLIAMS. Danrar. CoL J. S. LENG A SONS CO.. 33 Murray Streot. Naw York 

MOTORCYCLE SPEC CO.. 288 Columbus Avenue. Boston 



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50 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



TWO NEW MODELS OF THE JONES SPEEDOMETER— OTHER TRADE JOTTINGS. 



SEASON ODOMETER 
TRIP ODOMETER 



Two new Jones speedometers have 
been brought out, known as Models Nos. 
31 and 32. No. 32 is an entirely new in- 
strument, having every feature of the 
very expensive automobile types. No. 31 
is an improvement over the old Model 26. 
It is similar in appearance and construc- 
tion, with the same 60-mile scale and sea- 
son odometer. In addition to this it has 
a separate trip odometer. This instru- 
ment is listed at $20. 

Model No. 32 will, however, no doubt 
meet with most popular favor. This 
speedometer is certainly a most complete 
mileage and speed-indicating device. It 
has a 60-mile scale, a maximum speed 
hand with an instantaneous reset button, 
and both season and trip odometers. The 
latter indicates both miles and tenths of 
miles. The well-known Jones driving 
gears, consisting of a large gear attached 
to the wheel and a small gear carried by 
a ball bearing shaft at the end of the 
flexible cable, are used. 

Both of the new Speedometer-Odo- 
meters indicate variable and maximum 
speed and register the distance traveled. 
The season mileage to 99999/10 and the day or 
mileage to 999/10, is cumulatively recorded, whether the 
machine is moved forward or backward. The trip register 
can be instantly reset to zero by pushing the button. 

The copper maximum contrasts with the black variable 
hand. It is carried forward by the latter, but stops auto- 
matically at the highest speed attained, showing that speed 
as a permanent record until released by a push of the re- 
setting stem at the bottom of the cup. When released, the 



MAXIMUM 
SPEED HAND 







INSTANTANEOUS I SET 



"trip" 



maximum hand instantly returns to the speed at which 
the motorcycle is at that moment traveling, and there it 
remains, even after it is subsequently stopped; thus giving 
absolutely indisputable evidence of the speed at the mo- 
ment of resetting. By pushing and giving the resetting 
stem a half turn, the two hands are made to work as one, 
indicating variable speed only. This instrument is listed at 
$25, and is now ready for the market, with prospects of a 
big sale. 



The New Departure Manufacturing Company, of Bristol, 
Conn., announces a new and greatly improved coaster brake 
of the internal expanding band type. It has been tested 
out by numerous disinterested riders and several manufac- 
turers and, according to the New Departure Company, it 
has been found to be practically faultless. The tests have 
been of the severest kind, covering a period of several months. 

Mr. DeWitt Page, secretary of the company, states that 
to a man the riders report that the brake works perfectly, 
responding promptly to the slightest back-pedal pressure, 
and with no suggestion of binding; it does not easily heat 
up, and it is noiseless. The pedals positively do not "pick 
up" when riding. They say further that it is possible to 
hold the rear wheel instantly against high-powered motors. 
The new model meets the demand of the rider for a larger 
and stronger brake, the size having been increased suf- 
ficiently to allow for heavier parts. At the same time, the 
weight is not by any means excessive, or sufficient to cause 
objection by either rider or manufacturer. The popular 
concave design of former models is retained. 

The principal improvement is in the brake end of the 
hub. This is of the simplest construction. There are but 



two working parts, each built heavily for wear and hard 
service. These parts are a thick tool steel, especially 
tempered spring brake ring, three-quarters of an inch wide 
and a heavy cam dog pivoted on a steel stud. The brake 
ring is anchored with a heavy stud. Upon applying back 
pedal pressure the rider instantly rotates a new and heavy 
clutch, and actuates the cam dog against the free end of 
the brake ring, forcing it into positive, even and smooth 
contact with the inner wall of the brake drum at all points. 

The brake spring opens against the direction of the rota- 
tion of the wheel, making it mechanically impossible for 
the brake to bind, lock or wind up. Upon releasing the 
back pedal pressure, the spring instantly returns to its 
normal position. It is assisted in this by the forward 
rotating of the hub. The steel employed is especially 
treated to give long life under the friction necessary to 
the operation of the brake. 

The diameter and width of the brake drum have been 
increased, doubling the braking surface and obviating pos- 
sibility of injury by heating. Riders will be interested in 
reading the opinions of riders, printed on the inside cover 
of this issue. 



The Chicago 600 mile endurance, 200 miles a day, was 
particularly severe on the tires. The team cup, the highest 
honors possible, were won by the Yale team of three. Of 
these two rode on Kokomo tires. The Kokomo Rubber 
Company are quiet folks. Their advertisements are not 
noisy and they never ask for a line in the reading pages — 
they didn't ask for this — but their victory in the Chicago run 
is worth turning the calcium on. A line to Kokomo, In- 
diana, will bring you the complete story of their enduring 
tires which, it is almost unnecessary to add, are so made as 
to be thoroughly dependable. 



Morgan & Wright, who introduced the single-clinch rim, 
which has been used almost exclusively by the factories 
this year, report that it has given perfect satisfaction, and 
they will soon have a 2-inch racing rim of the same pattern 
ready. The rim, being properly shaped, will absolutely 
prevent tires from blowing off rims. 

"Bouquets" is the title of an interesting little booklet 
published by the Harley-Davidson Company, which will be 
sent gratis to any reader of this paper. The company's 
address is Milwaukee, Wis. 



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August 1, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 51 

Price with Endless Flat fp— M Shamrock Gloria ¥ 

Belt and Idler ? fi!f ^ d^^^Belt optional Here 

Magneto 
extra 




$35 



THE YALE £ H. P. MOTORCYCLE WINS 

SILVER TROPHY CUP 

Every Claim Proved by Actual Demonstration 

The Yale team of three riders won The Chicago Motorcycle Club Endurance Contest, with carbu- 
retor, vibrator, battery box and spark plug sealed, in competition with most of the prominent makes on 
July 9th, 10th and 11th. 

600 miles without a single adjustment, making 
perfect team score, with every seal intact 

AVERAGE SPEED TWENTY MILES PER HOUR 

Conceded by all Contestants to be the Mest Severe Contest Ever HeM 

The Chicago Tribune, July 13th, says : "The Yale team, composed of S. J. Chubbuck, W. \Y. Ingram 
and A. R. Oberwegner was awarded a perfect score and declared the winner of the silver loving cup by 
the technical committee in the six hundred mile Endurance Run held under the auspices of The Chicago 
Motorcycle Club, which was completed on Sunday. 

'The Excelsior team was given second place, the Harley-Davidson trio third, Pierce fourth and the 
Armac team fifth. 

"When the committee examined the machines of the winning trio yesterday it could not discover a 
single defect in the mechanism, while in the others penalties were levied for various reasons." 

This performance establishes a record for dependability unheard of in the history of motorcycle 
building and substantiates our claim that the Yale 3V 2 H. P. motorcycle is the MOST RELIABLE 
MACHINE ON THE MARKET. 

Correspondence Solicited from Aggressive Agents 
PROMPT DELIVERIES 



THE CONSOLIDATED MFG. CO. 

1731 FERNWOOD AVE., TOLEDO, OHIO 

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52 



MOTQR CYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 





CORRUGATED TREAD 



BAILEY TREAD 



THE THREE TIRES AND THE TUBE 
WRIGHTS NAME FAMOUS WHE1 



Morgan &WrightTires 
are good tires 



of the fact that endurance riders 
tires for their long, hard grinds; 
man who is going round 
is using Morgan C& Wright 
this is still more convinc- 
in hardest test of all — 
vice — one and all give 



There are good substantial reasons back 
almost invariably choose Morgan C& Wright 
Reasons why Riley, the 
the world on a motorcycle, 
tires; Reasons why (and 
ing) riders who use them 
everyday, everywhere ser- 
this testimony. 

Here are a few of the reasons: 

In the first place Morgan C& Wright tires are made much stronger than is 
required for ordinary service. Thus they are able to easily withstand those unusual 
shocks and strains of service that would put an ordinary tire "out of business" in 
short order. 

They are made out of the same material and by the same wrapped shaped 

MORGAN & WRIGHT 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



53 




BASKET WEAVE TREAD 




BUTT END TUBE 



WHICH HAVE MADE MORGAN & 
EVER MOTORCYCLES ARE RIDDEN 

method of construction as we use for our automobile tires. Because of this, when 
the first tread is finally worn down the fabric will be found in perfect condition for 
a re-tread, thus nearly doubling the mileage at small extra expense. Before the first 
tread is worn down on a tire made by ordinary methods, the fabric is usually in such 
poor condition that re-treading is impossible. 

Our different treads are made not by squeezing the ordinary allowance of tread 
stock up into corrugations but by adding additional tread stock. This insures long 
service even after the tread is worn smooth. 

The time-saving Butt End tube is making a big hit among riders the country 
over. It permits of removing the tube and making repairs without removing the 
wheel and spoiling chain or belt adjustments. 

All our tubes are made out of the finest quality of stock and in the shape they will 
assume when in use. 

Tires can be supplied in either single or double clinch. 

Dealers everywhere sell them. 

- - - DETROIT, MICH. 



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54 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE MART— IT SELLS THE STUFF 
Buy; Sell; Exchange. Two Cents a Word* Cash With Copy 



FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE 



FOR SALE.— Tandem attachment for R. S., good as 
new, with bars and Mesinger cavalry saddle; $io takes it; 
fit most any make. Wm. L. Williams, Greenfield, Ind. 

FOR SALE. — Brand new Quick Action Stand, complete; 
$2. Leland Wright, Bordentown, N. J. 



FOR SALE.— Wagner, run 300 miles. Geo. Dobling, 
Lost Nation, Iowa. 

FOR SALE. — Absolutely new four-cylinder Pierce 
Motorcycle; never used; $300; a rare bargain. Inquire E, 
care Motorcycle Illustrated. 



FOR SALE. — Brand new 1909 3j4-h.p. single cylinder 
Magneto M. M. Motorcycle; V belt, variable speed pulley; 
never used; $190. Address H., care Motorcycle Illustrated. 



FOR SALE.— F. N. four-cylinder motorcycle, good as 
new; new Bailey tread tires, horn, cyclometer, lamp, gen- 
erators and tools; outfit cost $400; a bargain for cash. F. 
W. Miller, 116 Pleasant Valley, Methuen, Mass. 

MOTORCYCLES bought, sold and exchanged. Bar- 
gains in Indian, Pierce and M. M. machines. Collwell's 
Motorcycle Agency, 10 Golden street, Newburgh, N. Y. 

FOR SALE.—1009 3-h.p. Curtiss, spring fork and stand; 
also Curtiss side car; sold together or separately. Best 
offer takes them. Fred Trubshaw, 881 Mound street, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

FOR SALE. — Harley-Davidson, speedometer, horn; a 
fine machine in excellent condition. Make offer. A. W. 
Osborne, 139 South Bay street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

ALMOST new Schebler Model H Motorcycle car- 
bureter and Persons tourist tool bag for sale, cheap; 
satisfactory trial or no pay. Win. G. Lauterbach, Men- 
dota, 111. 

FOR SALE.— Late model twin cylinder 5 h.p. Indian. 
Owner going abroad. $125. J. Eblen. Ridgedale, Tenn. 

WANTED.— Will pay cash for Motorcycle, 354-h.p. or 
over. Front Post, Ridg edale, Tenn. 

FOR SALE.— 1908 Curtiss twin, lamp and generator, 
standard robber pedals, new belt, stand, luggage carrier, tool 
roll, new weight pomp, fine running order ; cheap. J. R. Hen- 
derson, Annapolis, M<L, Room 318* U. S. N. A. 

FOR EXCHANGE.— Oldsmobile runabout, in good condi- 
tion, for double cylinder motorcycle, 1909 model E. O. 
Shoulin, Viola, Rkhland County, Wis, 



CURTISS 1909 twin, a month in use, run 500 miles; $225; 
seen any time; perfect. Vreeland, 37 Danforth avenue, Jer- 
sey City, N. J. 

FOR SALE.— N. S. U. Motorcycle, 6-h.p. twin; complete 
with fan, two-speed gear and side car; better than new; 
has been ridden very little. Wellington A. Francis, 164 
Union street, New Bedford, Mass. 

FOR SALE.— F. N. Big Four; a bargain. T. E. F. Hos- 
kins, 249 Washington avenue, Brooklyn, N, Y. 

FOR SALE. — F. N. four-cylinder new 1909 model, in per- 
fect condition. $300. Address "Opportunity," care Motor- 
cycle Illustrated. 



AGENTS CARDS, ETC. 



MOTORCYCLES — 35 second hand machines on hand, all 
makes; $40 up. Send stamp for descriptive circular. Tiger 
Cycle Works Co., 782 Eighth avenue, New York City. 

MOTORCYCLES thoroughly overhauled and repaired. 
Agents for Thor motorcycles, parts and sundries. Braze nor 
& Ruderman, 849 Bedford avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

M-M and R-S MOTORCYCLES— East End Cycle Co., 
Highland & Beitler, near Centre Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

FOR SALE. — 1909 Curtiss, magneto twin, spring forks, etc 
Cost $325, used 500 miles. Sell $175. Architects & Engineers 
Supply Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

FOR SALE— New 5-h.p. twin Indian $200; second hand 
5-h.p. twins, $125 up; singles, $75 up. F. B. Widmayer 
Company, 2312 Broadway, New York City. 

FOR BARGAINS in second hand motorcycles, Merkels, 
Indians and M. M., call at the M. M. Motorcycle store, 38 
Belleville Ave., Newark, N. J. 

MOTORCYCLISTS' friend, black hand cleaner, in small 
collapsible tubes, 15 cents; by mail, 17 cents. Send for sample; 
can be carried in tool bag. F. B. Widmayer Co., 2312 Broad- 
way, New York City. Agents wanted.* 

FOR SALE.— 1907 twin Curtiss, 5 h.p. in good condition 
and running order, $125. R. Julian, 1007 Lowman Bldg., 
Seattle, Wash. 

SECOND - HAND m! M. BARGAINS.— Exhaust 
Whistles, Hand Idlers. M. M. Branch, 895 Main street, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

FOR SALE. — Fifteen new B. & C two-speed gears; fit 
any Indian; can save you 30 per cent. Carpenter, 1405 E. 
&?d street, Cleveland, O. 



r.N. 



ALL SOLD OUT! 

We ere dad to ann o un ce we hare sold all of the F. N. Bag Four 
Motorcycles we contracted for the 1009 season, bat sorry to say that 

00 acconnT of tbc enormons demand in Europe we are enable to pet any 
more. Please don": serd n< anr orders therefor, for we mill onlr have 
Jo return tbem with thanVs and regrets. Well soon be ready to 

1*11; J 03 tO you. 



r.N 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



55 






The Only 

MOTORCYCLE 

VULCANIZER 

Mr. Repair Aan : 

Grasp this opportunity —Tear off the above coupon and 
mail it at once — Be the FIRST repair man in your vicinity to have' 
a Shaler Motorcycle Tire Vulcanizer — Get in on the ground floor- 



Cinch the business. 

The Shaler Electric Vulcanizers have been 



1 The Acknowledged Standard " for 



automobile tire repairing for years. They were in use in 4,895 Garages in the 
United States, July 1, 1909. 

We now offer to Motorcycle Repairmen, The Shaler Motorcycle Vulcanizer. 
It puts the heat right on the inside of the tire where the new fabric is applied and 
does away with the necessity of cutting away a lot of good rubber. 

IT WILL PUT A BIG PROFIT IN YOUR CASH-DRAWER 



The PIONEER For 1910 




NOW 

READY 

FOR 

DfflVEKY 

THE 

ONE 

SILMT 

MOTORCYCLE 



Motor, tfA" Bore; 4— 4 l / 2 H.P. 



Hose-Bright Auto. Size Annular Ball Bearings 

Vahres in Head. Mechanically Operated 

Single Cam Operate* Through Pull Rods 
Bosch Magneto, Shaft Driven 

Seamless Brass Tanks 



Crank Hsnger Adjustable All Directions 
Triple Compound Spring Forks 

Genuine Watawata V Belt 

Wheel Base 56 Inches 

Wheels 26 or 28 Inch 

Write For More Information 



THE ROYAL MOTOR WORKS, Inc., Worcester, Mass. 



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56 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 




NONE LIKE IT 



This spark plug is the only plug of its kind— it is abso- 
lutely the only plug made that is infallible— no 
amount of short-circuiting matter will affect the 
sparking qualities in Reliance Spark Plugs. 

Mechanically correct in every detail— even 
the porcelain is different— made of a new heat 
proof composition— if by accident you break a 
porcelain the plug remains proof against leakage 
of current, it being provided with a mica tube 
through which a copper quill or central electrode 
(which makes contact with a hair-like platinum 
wire) passes. 

SEE THAT POINT- 

It means perfect ignition in every sense 
of the word. Owing to its smallness and 
unique construction it assures you of a spark 
always. Even water, which is the worst of 
short-circuiting matter, has no effect. How 
then can soot or other fouling matter mar 
the sparking qualities ? 

Ask your dealer or send direct for val- 
uable information about perfect ignition. 

Made in porcelain or mica backs. 



Jeffery-Dewitt Co. 

230 High Street, NEWARK, N. J. 

5. & F. Stephenson, Agents for United Kingdom, 19 Canning PL, Liverpool, Eng. 

Armand Frey & Co., Agents for Continental Europe, Berlin, Germany 









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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



57 



THE NEW MOTORCYCLE 
COES WRENCH 




To meet the needs 
of Motorcyclists 
who want a small 
wrench of strength 
and reliability 

Coes Standard 
quality, opens 

IV- 6" long 

We make fifty sizes in 

five styles 
Order thro your dealer (tf;:, c 
or of any cycle supply 
jobber 

Get our Catalog 





COES WRENCH CO., Worcester, Mass. 



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58 MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED August 1, 1909. 




3 HARLEY- 
DAVIDSONS 



started in the strenuous Endurance Contest held by the Chicago 
Motorcycle Club, July 9th, 10th, and 11th, and ALL OF THESE 
MACHINES FINISHED THE CONTEST WITHOUT ONE 
SINGLE ADJUSTMENT AND 

WITHOUT BREAKING ONE SINGLE SEAL 

MORE THAN THIS, it was the opinion of everyone who saw 
the HARLEY-DAVIDSON machines at the completion of the 
trying ordeal that both the machines and their riders were in 
the best condition by far of any machines or riders in the con- 
test. After 600 miles of hard riding, over roads which in 
places were really no roads at all, all three of the HARLEY- 
DAVIDSONS were in the very 

PINK OF CONDITION 

and willing and ready for 600 or 6000 miles more without 
one second's preparation. 

No other motorcycle in the world has the ability to STAND 
UP like the HARLEY-DAVIDSON. 

SPEED? WELL I GUESS!!! 

The latest killing was at Omaha, Nebraska, July 18th, when 
Walter M. Bell (not a factory expert either), riding a single 
cylinder HARLEY-DAVIDSON, won every race in which it 
was possible to enter, defeating a classy bunch of racers into 
the bargain. 

Harley-Davidson Motor Co, 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



59 




Performances of the Past 

Are the Surest Guarantee of the Future 




THE N. S. U. WORLD'S RECORD "7" 



P' ERSONALLY you do not care for speed. What you want to know is : How does the N. S. U. 
behave in the hands of its owners ? How reliable is the N. S. U. Motor? What are the 
enduring qualities of the N. S. U. Motorcycle in general ? 

These are questions which the N. S. U. enjoys, questions which can be answered by actual 
performances on the Track, Road 1 or Hill. It is a proven fact that no matter what the nature 
of contest may be, if the N. S. U. enters, its performances prove to be almost marvelous and verify our 
assertion as to its standing. 

THE WORLD'S BEST MOTORCYCLE 

IN SPEED CONTESTS we can boast of numerous World's Records, both amateur and professional. So phenomenal were 
the limes made by the N. S. U.. that protests were filed claiming over size ol the N. S. U. Motors. 

IN HILL CLIMBING the N. S. U. attain proves itself little short of a marvel. N. S. U. Motors almost half the size of 
ffs competitors perform so miraculously that the protests which attain prevailed were not surprising. 

IN ENDURANCE CONTESTS, also, the performances of the N.S. U. have'never been equalled. Both durintt 1908 and 1909 
the N. S. U. has covered itself with ttlory. Perfect scores and Gold Aedals seem to tto in confunction with the N. S. U. 
Its pertecl desittn and its absolute mechanical perfection place it in the front rank as the most serviceable, economical 
and thoroutthly dependable motorcycle on the market. You surely will be interested in a motorcycle which approaches 
nearer the Ideal than any other machine manufactured; therefore write lor our beautiful catalogue M lo-day. 

N. S. U. MOTOR CO., 206 W. 76th St., New York City 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



You Need A 

JONES SPEEDOMETER 

Whether you ride in the F. A. M. Endurance Contest or 
whether you never leave the streets of your own city. 
Speed Laws are strict — more so now than ever before. 
The Jones is accepted in Court as undisputable testimony in 
cases of arrest for speeding. In riding to a schedule you 
simply have got to have a JONES. The new Jones 
Model 32 is the most complete and accurate motorcycle 
speedometer made. 

JONES SPEEDOMETER DEP'T, UNITED MANUFACTURERS, INC. 

BROADWAY AND 76th STREET, NEW YORK 



MAXIMUM 
HAND 



SEASON ODOMETER 
TRIP ODOMETER 







INSTANTANEOUS RESET 



Model 32 Price $23.00 



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August 1, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 61 



The New 1910 



RACYCLE MOTORCYCLE 



will appear in the F. A. A. Endurance Run from Cleve- 
land, Ohio, to Indianapolis, Indiana, on August iOth. 

<| Watch for it, and see how it performs—for it is sure 
to make a "hit." 

<f The Racycle Motorcycle has ALWAYS had a good 
reputation. It is not an experiment but a machine 
that has "delivered the goods." 

qThe New 1910 Model incorporates all the BEST 
ideas in Motorcycle construction and many improve- 
ments over otd ideas. It is equipped with 

The Musselman Motor Coaster Brake 

<f Watch that, too, for it is a decided improvement over 
the old style Aotor Coasters and is the only motor 
brake on the market that has the air-cooled feature 
and that does not require a side arm. 

"It's as Powerful as an Air-Brake * f 

Write for Free I 11 as tr a ted Catalog, describing in detail, both the Racycle Motorcycle 
and the Musselman Motor Brake 

THE MIAMI CYCLE & MEG. CO, Middletown, Ohio 

Licensed Coaster Brake Manufacturers 



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62 MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED August 1, 1909. 



Comfort Sileri 



'T^HESE are the most striking characteristics of the 
M. M. Motorcycle, positively the easiest riding 
machine ever produced in this or any other country. 



M. M. Riders 

Stick to 

M. M. Machines 

WHY? 




SPKCIAL MAGNETO. 



Y 

Y 
? 

I 

I 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
I 

A 

Y 

I 

Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

Kindly always mention the paper ivhen writing to advertisers. 



Simply because they give the best possible all-around 
service, regardless of the amount of money invested. 

DISTRIBUTING 

American Motor Company - - 218 Clarendon St. - - Boston, Mass. 

Geo. P. Jenkins - - - - 10 W. 60th St. - - New York City. 
L. E. French 895 Main St. ... Buffalo, N. Y. 



American Motor 



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August 1, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 63 



ce *> Efficiency 



'TpHE key to success for any agent is to have his 
riders keep riding and maintain their enthusiasm 
over the same machine — all the time. 

That is the 
Certain Result 

of an 
M. M. Agency 




TWIN. BATTERY. 



Our Agency Proposition is a Hummer, a Genuine, 
Positive Money-Maker. If you're wise you will write 
for our proposition. 

STORES: 

G. M. Greene - Mgr. Am. Motor Co., 1536 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

American Motor Co. of Texas - - M. M. Building - - - Dallas, Tex. 
Lincoln Holland .... 1034 So. Main St. - Los Angeles, Cal. 



A 



Co., Brockton, Mass. 



r 
r 

T 

_lY 



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64 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 




4-CYLINDER 




SHAFT DRIVE 



The Pierce Four-Cylinder Motorcycle combines all the advantages of design and construction that will be 
demanded by any discriminating rider. The Pierce is best appreciated by those who have had a broad motor- 
cycle experience, and their unanimous verdict is that it is the best designed and best built motorcycle on 
the market. 

THE YEAR'S RECORD 

During the present season the Pierce has been sold in all sections of the country, as well as abroad. In 
many instances the machines have gone into the hands of inexperienced users. Universal satisfaction has been 
the rule, and the machines have met and overcome most trying conditions in all parts of the country. 

Asido from superior construction wo claim to have advantages over all other motorcycles in 
the following f oatnrts : 

4 Cylinders, shaft drive, large frame, automatic oiling system, no tanks, magneto, two braKes, 
low position and easy control. 

We have increased our original estimate of production for 19C9, and are able to take care of all orders 
received. 

Correspondence is solicited. Literature on request. 

We also manufacture the world-famous Pierce Bicycles in rigid and cushion frames. 



THE PIERCE CYCLE CO., 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 

BrancHess DENVER, COLORADO, and OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



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Augi-st 1, 19C9. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



65 



(ft 



$ 



BRANCHES, Boston — 202 Devonshire St. Chicago— 20 La Salle St. 
Philadelphia — Empire Tire Co., 322 N. Broad St. 



Ave. 



Newark— 264 Halsey St. Detroit — 842 Woodward _ 

Chicago — 130 1 Michigan Ave. Philadelphia — Empire Tire Co., 322 N. Broad St. New York — 73d St. & Broadway. 

New York — 148 Chambers St. 
AGENCIES. 
Atlanta, Ga. f Dunham Rubhcr Co.; Atlantic City, N. J., Perm Auto Supply Co.; Boise, Idaho, Randall Dodd Auto Co.; Buffalo, 
N. Y., Empire Sales Co.; Cleveland, O., Motor Supply Agency Co.; Denver, Col., Denver Auto Goods Co.; Dallas, Tex., Munger 
Auto Co.; Jacksonville, Fla.. Savell Rubber Co.; Los Angeles, Cal., Empire Tire and Rubber Co.; Minneapolis, Minn., Empire 
Tire and Rubber Co.; New Orleans. La., H. A. Testard; Norfolk. Va., Wm. H. Grover; Pittsburg, Pa., Consumers' Auto Supply Co.; 
Portland, Me., James Bailey Co.; Providence, R. L, Watte Auto Supply Co.; St. Louis, Mo., Gorman Bros.; Savannah, Ga., Harris 
Tire Co.; Syracuse, N. Y., Central City Rubber Co.; Toledo, Ohio. W. G. Nagel Electric Co.; Auto Specialty Co., Kansas City, Mo. 



EMPIRE RAISED TREAD MOLDED 
MOTORCYCLE TIRES 

THESE TIRES are extra heavy; made with heavy, 
closely woven fabric, and a lot of good rubber. They 
are tires that will give long and satisfactory service. 
With these tires we supply our molded, detached Map, 
which has proved such a great success with our auto- 
mobile tires. 




EMPIRE RAISED TREAD. 

EMPIRE LIGHT MOTORCYCLE TIRE 

This tire is of lighter construction than the molded 
tire, and is cured flat. It is, however, a thoroughly 
strong and serviceable tire. It is the best tire obtain- 
able at the very reasonable prices charged. 

Empire tires wear longest because they arc made by 
skilled workmen on modern machinery and of the best 
material obtainable. 



EMPIRE PEERLESS V BELT 




Strong, flexible, durable, practicable, non-stretchable. 
Made in four sizes for 28 pulleys only; length, 8 ft. 
7 ins. 

We solicit a trial order, and are confident you will 
pronounce it the best belt you have ever used. 

EMPIRE MOTORCYCLE TUBES 




Both the endless and the butt-end styles are fur- 
nished in two grades and weights of rubber. The 
Empire gray tubes are of the standard thickness and 
weight, and made from fine Para rubber. The Empire 
Peerless tubes are made from red rubber, and are very 
much thicker, heavier and stronger than gray tubes. 
The Empire Peerless red tubes are put through a 
special process which prevents deterioration. These 
are the best tubes that have ever been offered for 
motorcycle use. 




Empire Tire Co. 



RENTON, IM. J. 




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66 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 




The Chicago Endurance 

Run Winners all Rode Machines 
with Eclipse Coaster Brakes 



Read and be Convinced 



Mr. Ralph D. Webster, Toledo, O., July 21, 1909. 

c/o Eclipse Machine Co., Elmira, N. Y. 
Dear Sir: 

Doubtless you will be pleased to know that the three Yale Motorcycles ridden by the 
Yale Team, which won the Chicago Motorcycle Club Endurance Contest, July 10th and 
nth, being awarded the Silver Trophy Cup, were fitted with Eclipse Coaster Brakes. 

Six hundred miles without making an adjustment of any kind, at an average speed of 
20 miles an hour, establishing a record for dependability unheard of in the history of Motor- 
cycle building, and establishing a world's record for reliability. Respectfully yours, 

The Consolidated Mfg. Co., A. B. Coffman, Sales Manager. 



Our Front Motorcycle Hubs, 
illustrated above, have been 
greatly improved by the use 
of the knock-out axle. The 
ball cups of the hub shell are 
turned from bar steel and ac- 
curately ground. The cones 
are turned from special cone 
steel and are screwed on a 
centra] quill with wrench- 
tight fit. The axle passes 
through the quill, thus making 
possible easy removal of the 
wheel. 



Is a Comment Neces- 
sary ? If, however, you 
still desire to be shown, 
see our representative 
at the store of the 
HEARSEY-WILLIS CO. 

Indianapolis 

during the F. A. M 

Meet, or write directly 

to 



The Eclipse Motorcycle 
Coaster Brake is the first of 
its kind designed for motor- 
cycle use. The mechanical 
principles are similar to those 
used in the Eclipse Bicycle 
Coaster Brake — the screw, the 
wedge and the lever. The 
Eclipse is made from 3-inch 
round bar stock, and it runs 
and coasts on perfectly de- 
signed ball-bearings. Special 
attention has been paid to 
lubrication. 



ECLIPSE MACHINE CO., ELMIRA, N. Y. 

LICENSED COASTER BRAKE MANUFACTURERS 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 67 

This Tire 

Drives Your Tire Troubles Away! 

The Goodyear Strong Fabric Moulded Clincher Motor- 
cycle Tire is the toughest — yet easiest riding — motorcycle 
tire made. 

It wears the longest, causes the least trouble — costs the 
least for upkeep — and is most easily repaired. 

The fabric which goes into this tire — the toughest fabric 
known — is such that even if the tire is cut or jagged by sharp 
stones, or other obstacles, it can be repaired with ease. 

The fabric, being so closely woven, does not separate. 

Unquestionably, the 




Note the oaiinf of thii most 
durable of all motorcycle tires. 
8end for a sample section and 
examine the four plies of the 
strongest, toughest, most closely 
woven fabric pat into any motor- 
cycle tire on the market. 

We can furnish this tire in 
either sincle or . doable olinoh. 



(jOODjfftAR 



saves the user money in all ways as compared 
with any other tire, as you will see. 

The wise motorcyclist who figures up the 
cost at the end of the season knows that the 
Goodyear is really the LOWEST PRICED 
tire on the market. It will outwear several 
pairs of the ordinary kind. 

For the cover stock is of toughened rubber, 
the strongest made, especially treated, built 
for the extreme of wear, yet still retaining its 
resiliency. This is strengthened by the casing 
— moulded type — which has four plies of the 
strongest, toughest, most durable, most closely 
woven fabric put into any motorcycle tire. 
This is the famous Sea Island fabric, which 
costs 55c a yard. We could use common mus- 
lin at 5j/£c a yard. But it requires 300 pounds 
to break Sea Island fabric, while common 
muslin breaks at 40 to 60 pounds. Hence it 



Strong Fabric 
Motorcycle Tire 

wouldn't do for the Goodyear Strong Fabric 
Moulded Clincher Motorcycle Tires. 

The Goodyear Tire can be permanently 
repaired. Some motorcycle tires are "done 
for" just as soon as they are slightly 
damaged. 

The tube is of the same stock we use in our 
famous Red Seal Automobile Tubes. Butt end 
or endless type. 

The only rubber used in Goodyear Tires is 
the finest of new Para, quoted at $1.50 a pound 
today. We could use "Borneo" or "Guayule" 
at 35c a pound, or even "reclaimed" rubber 
from the junk pile at 10c a pound. But this 
wouldn't do for a Goodyear, any more than 
common muslin. With all their strength and 
durability Goodyear Motorcycle Tires are the 
most resilient, easiest riding. We can furnish 
them in either single or double clinch. Write 
for sample section. Get our special agency 
proposition. 



The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., s?r°e"t Akron, Ohio 

RBAMrRsTQ- Atlanta ' 9 ° **• P rv or St.; Boston, 261 Dartmouth St.; Chicago, 82-84 Michigan Ave; Buffalo. 719 Main St.; Cincinnati. 317 E. Fifth 
DIUUlyl&XtJ. St. ; Cleveland. 2005 Euclid Ave; Denver, 28 W. Colfax Ave.; Detroit, 251 Jefferson Ave.; Los Angeles. 949-95» S. Mam St.; New 
York City, 64th St. and Broadway; Philadelphia, Broad and Fairmount Aves. ; Pittsburg, 5988 Center Ave.; San Francisco, 506 Golden Gate Ave.; 
St. Louis, 3935-37 Olive St.; Washington, 1026 Connecticut Ave. 

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68 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



K 



WHAT IS THE 
MATTER WITH 
YOUR TIRES? 



O 



Our 

Gridiron 
Tread Will 
Hit You Right 



K 



THAT'S A QUESTION 
SELDOM PUT TO 
THOSE WHO USE 
THE KOKOttO 
BRAND 



o 




K 




o 



MONO RUBBER CO. 

KOKOMO, IND. 

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August 1. 19C9. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



69 




Don't buy on guesswork* Don't take every claim at its face 
value* Investigate before you decide* We invite this because we 
know our product will stand investigation* 



I 



WE CAN TELL YOU 



all Curtiss engines develop more power and 
speed for the same cubic capacity than 
any other engines in the world. 

we won the only Diamond Medal in the 
1907 F. A. M. Endurance Run and High- 
est Awards in both classes of the 1908 
F. A. M. Endurance Run. 



1 



Roller Bearings are better than bronze, 
the Curtiss "V" Belt Transmission, with 6 

years of experience behind it, is the best 

in the world, 
the Curtiss Frame and Fork Construction 

has proven superior to all other types. 



Write, us and ask for Catalog C, describing the famous "World's Record" Motorcycles. Most romplete line ever 
offered. One to three cylinders ; three to ten horsepower. Sidecars, Delivery Vans, etc. Some good territory still 
open. Write to-day. 

THE HERRING-CURTISS COMPANY 

HAMMONDSPORT, N. Y. 

Successors to The G. H. Curtiss Mfg. Co. 

New York Distributors, " Curtiss Motorcycle Co./ 9 1203 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pacific Coast Distributor, G. A. Faulkner, 351 Twelfth Street, Oakland, Cal. 



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70 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



REL4AINGE 



f\ NAME THAT 
"MEANS SOMETHING 



THIS machine is made to 
live up to its title — and 
it does it. Manufac- 
tured in singles and twins — 5 
models in all — the Reliance is 
the machine for the rider of 
moderate means. Our Model C. 
for example, costing only $200, 
is so perfectly balanced that a 
test on the stand showed a max- 
imum of over 4,000 R. P. M. 
and a minimum of well under 
250 R. P. M. In both cases 
spark was fully advanced, and 
the result obtained entirely by 
throttle control. The valves are 
mechanically operated by separate 
cams, doing away entirely with 
outside push rods and rocker 
arms, making many less parts to 
wear and get out of adjust- 
ment, a mo^t important feature 
with m e c ban i c a 1 1 y operated 
valves. 

This machine is a big favorite 
jwith both dealers and riders, for 
it always makes good. 




RELIANGE MOTOR GYGLE COMPANY, OWEGO, N. Y. 



BE SURE 
YOU 
KNOW THE 




rPAYS 
TO 
KNOW 




5 Leod Motorcycle Coil 



MOTORCYfT TSTS • avail yourselves of the best in ignition 

AUV * ****** * VijW A M * SYSTEMS— USE A PITTSFIELD SYSTEM 

Don't get caught on the road with a defective 
Coil and have to trundle your motorcycle miles 
to the nearest repair shop. 

The Pittsfield Motorcycle Coils will shoot 
the same steady, efficient spark into your 
motor at all times. 

The mica insulation of the Pittsfield Motorcycle 
Spark Plugs does not crack. It is practically one solid mass 
of mica. Specially prepared electrodes afford the maximum resistance to the high tension current. 

Magneto spark Plug Is your Motorcycle a single orTwo cylinder one ? We have coils for both in flat and conical ends. 





4 Lead Motorcycle Coil 



TRY ONE 



PITTSFIELD SPARK COIL CO., Dalton, Mass. 

Sales Representatives: New England States, W. J. Connell, 36 Columbus Avenue, Boston; Atlantic States, Thomas J.Wetzel, 29 West 
42nd Street, New York; Central States, K. Franklin Peterson, H.V. Greenwood, 166 Lake Street, Chicago; Michigan, L, D. Bolton, 319 
Hammond Building, Detroit; Pacific Coast, The Laugenour Co., San Francisco, Cal. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



71 



WATCH TBI EMBLEM'S FIRST EXPERIENCE IN THE ENDURANCE RUN 

CLEVELAND to INDIANAPOLIS 



34 H.P. 

$175J»2 




4H.P. 

$200i5» 



EMBLEM MOTORCYCLES 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Emblem Manufacturing' Co., angola, n. y. 



THE STRENGTH OF SAMSON 

— - IS CHARACTERISTIC OF — =^^ 

THE CROUCH MOTORCYCLE 

This is no fad machine, no freak — The CROUCH is built to 
withstand the hard knocks of road riding, and it makes good 



THOROUGHLY 
UP - TO - DATE 



DOUBLE BAR FRAME -LARGE TANK- NEW 
GRIP CONTROL - NEW BELT TIGHTENER, 
GIVING FREE ENGINE AND OTHER FEATURES 



ENTIRELY 
DEPENDABLE 



If you want a first-class machine at a moderate price, you 
will buy a CROUCH Single : Agents wanted 



BEST VALUE FOR THE MONEY 

WRITE TO-DAY TO - 

CROUCH MOTOR COMPANY, "fflS^ 

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72 MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED August 1, 1909. 



THE 1910 GREYHOUND 

has been in active preparation for a long time. 

The orders under which this model was designed and produced contem- 
plated just one thing — that it should be in all respects the best motorcycle that 
it is possible to build. The designers were not hampered by the first consider- 
ation of cost nor of factory precedent nor of ny stock parts to be used — it is 
a new motorcycle from blue-print to crate, and if it doesn't surprise some of 
you and delight all of you it will be passing strange. 

In lines it is all grace and symmetry in metal. 

In weight, just that medium that gives strength to take all the grief of 
the road and keep doing it, and at the same time to eat up the hills with any 
weight rider. 

In control, the most flexible thing you ever saw, almost answering your 
thought ! 

In short, you must see it to know what the modern motorcycle should be. 

Keep your eye out for 

THE 1910 GREYHOUND 



" THE ONE BEST BET " 

T^O USE in buying imported motor and bicycle saddles now. 
The Troxel Eagle . Motor and Bicycle Saddles are recognized 
by the motor and bicycling public 
to be, without question, the best 
saddles ever offered to the trade. 
You can have the best by specif y- 
ing same. 

We do not ask you to take our TROXEL EAGLE 

word. Just compare the style, MOTOR SADDLE 

quality of leather, springs and work- L ^ n .^ ^Jjjfjjf 9 

manship with anything that is offered 
you and we will leave it to your own good judgment. Our guaran- 
tee is very peculiar in one way, that is, we live up to it. Write for 
catalog and guarantee to 

THE TROXEL MFG. COMPANY, Elyria, O., U. S. A. 




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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



73 



Night's Curtain Draws Asid 
When Touched 




Over 100,000 automobile owners use Prest-O-Lite. 
Most of these have lea rned^th rough sorry experi- 
ence, that feeble oil lamps and treacherous generators 
are sources of trouble, danger and expense. 

Motorcyclists, with the same old lighting problem. 
are reaching the same solution. 

With Prest-O-Lite there is no uncertainty, no 
dirty work, no spurts of light, no intervals of 
darkness. 

The road is flooded with light. The flame is steady, 
no matter what the bumps. Turned on and off like 
a gas jet. 



The Prest-O-Lite Motorcycle Gas Tank is 12 m. long 
and 4 in. diameter. Weighs 7 pounds. Holds 10 ft. of 
gas — 40 hours of light. 

PRIPF ^Ifl FULL TANK 75c. 

1 1X1WJ-I ylV (In Exchange for Empty) 

Thirty-day trial plan. See your dealer, or write us. 

The Prest-O-Lite Co., KS«— SSR in*: 

Branches at New York, Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco 
and Cleveland. 3,000 Exchange Agents 




TRACK RECORDS BROKEN BY THE 

FLYING MERKEL 



At Point Breeze track, Philadelphia, on June 12th 
Stanley T. Kellogg on Twin Merkel won the five 
mile and twenty-five mile open events, breaking 
the track records — both events. At the Hill Climb of the N. Y. M. Club at 
Hastings-on-the-Hudson, June 19th, Kellogg again demonstrated the speed of the 
Merkel by running a tie — the free for all class — the fastest time ever made on the 
hill. At Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 23rd, Emil Buerges on a Single Cylinder Merkel 

won the five mile open, the three mile 30.50 class, 
the Marathon distance race, 26 miles 385 yards, 
and was second in the 10 mile handicap. 

There is SPEED, COMFORT and RELIABILITY in the Merkel 

MERKEL-UGHT MOTOR COMPANY 

POTTSTOWN, PA. 

OVINOTON MOTOR CO., 2234 Broadway, New York Distributor*. 

0LLIER & WORTHING TON, 1100 S. Main St,, Los Angeles; 500 Golden Gate Are., 

San Francisco, Cal., Pacific Coast Distributors. 

CATALOG ON REQUEST 




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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Ari;usT 1, VX9. 




MOTORCYCLE OIL LAMP 

Showing a Red Rear Light 

A combination of headlight and tail light 

in one lamp. 
The Neverout burns kerosene oil 16 hours 
with one filling and will stay lighted under 
any and all conditions. 

All riveted — will not rattle apart over 
the roughest roads. 

Sold on ten days' trial. Price $3.00 
complete. 

The Neverout is 
equipped with a 
patent glass-cov- 
e r e d reflector, 
made of pure Ger- 
man silver; in- 
stantly removable; 
never loses its 
original brilliancy. 
Guaranteed to stay 
lighted or money 
refunded. 

Made in gun 
metal, brass and 
nickel finish. 

The only perfect 
and reliable motor- 
cycle lamp made. 

If your dealer 
cannot supply you, 
write us direct. 

Dealers: Write 
at once for our 




The Neverout Motorcycle Lamp, with 
combination tail light, showing rear view. 



(Patented,) proposition. 

ROSE MANUFACTURING CO. 



933 Arch Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 




MOTORCYCLE GAS LAMP 

And Independent Gas Generator 

(Patent Air Cooling System) 





Just HVhat You Havt B««n Looking For 

The most powerful motorcycle lighting apparatus made. 
Mirror Lense Reflector. 

SATISFACTORY 01 MOUSY BACK 

All First Class Dealers. Write For Literature. 

ROSC MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
Main Office. 933 Arch St. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



TRADE 



MARK 



The Spark Plug of Achievement 



q Adopted by prominent manufacturers — fea- 
tured by leading supply houses — used by thou- 
sands of motorcyclists. 

q What a mighty tribute to the superiority 
of the RED HEAD. 

q No other plug has so completely won the 
confidence of all three factors. 



q Simply and substantially constructed. 
q Its success was inevitable. 
q Highest grade materials. Porcelain or Mica. 
q Porcelain laughs at the heat. Guaranteed 
not to crack. 

q All sizes and styles. One popular price. 
91.00 EACH 



Send for Booklet M. C. 



EMIL GROSSMAM COMPANY, Manufacturers, 232 West 58th Street, New York 

CHICAGO: I486 Michigan Ave. DETROIT: 872 Woodward Ave. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.: Pacific Sales Corp., 50 Van Ness Ave., carry complete stocks. 



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August 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



/:> 



Solar 
Lamps 

live up to their reputation. 
Their good name is the result 
of twelve years of successful 
lamp building. If you want the 
very best there is, the one lamp 
that will make night riding posi- 
tively safe, then get a Solar. 
To insure a steady flow of gas 
you need a Solar Generator also. 



THE BADGER BRASS MFG. 
COMPANY 

Two Factories 

KENOSHA, WIS. 

437 Eleventh Ave., NEW YORK 




SHAMROCK 

GLORIA 

BELT 



THE KEYSTONE 

OF THE MOTORCYCLE 

There is no belt which can afford the motor- 
cyclist absolute satisfaction unless it be that 
of the rubber and canvas type, and 

THERE IS ONLY ONE 
RUBBER BELT; IT'S 

SHAMROCK GLORIA 

known throughout motorcycle circles as the 
only perfect, troubleless motorcycle trans- 
mission in the world. Every Belt is 
molded separately, inspected, and a Per- 
fect Product is the Result. 

AVOID SUBSTITUTES, 
INSIST ON THE GENUINE 

Every manufacturer supplies them, every 
dealer handles them; if not, we'll tend to 
your wants. 

N.S.U. BELT LINK 




The life of your belt whether rubber or leather 
depends considerably on the fastener; it must be 
flexible, strong and of the correct principle. There's 
only one fastener to consider, the N. S. U. 
Sent by mail. I 11 30c; i" and 1 " 40c. 

There are many other specialties you need, too, fully 
illustrated and explained in our specialty booklet. 

WRITE TO DAY. 
N. S. U. MOTOR COMPANY, 

206 West 76th Street, New York City 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 



BEAVER WATERPROOF LEATHER BELTING 

THE IDEAL MOTORCYCLE BELT 

BEAVER Belting is tanned by a secret process, making an absolutely insoluble leather 
of great tensile strength. Is not affected by climatic conditions and resists the action of 
water, oil and the fumes of gases. Will transmit more power, stretch less, wear longer, 
and is the only belt on the market that will not slip when wet. 

In writing for prices specify dimensions and description of Belt required. 

American Belting & Tanning Co. wSIS^Smu 242 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



AGENTS. LOOK HERE 

The MINNEAPOLIS DIRECT-DRIVE MODEL FB $185.00 




Thor Motor 

and very best 

equipment 

all around 



MINNEAPOLIS MOTORCYCLE CO., Inc. 



517 SOUTH 7th STREET 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 




STANDARD SPEEDOMETER 
Price $15.00 



IT IS TIME TO EQUIP 

your motorcycle with a Speedometer or a 
combination Speedometer-Odometer. 

When you do, get a good one. 

The STANDARD is guaranteed to be and 
to remain both accurate and steady even 
on rough roads, and it is a good looker. 

Strong Cast Fitting* for 
Every Make of Machine. 

STANDARD THERMOMETER COMPANY 

65 Shirley Street, - - - BOSTON 




SPEEDOMETER-ODOMETER 
Price $20.00 



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Augcst 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



If You Were Buying 
Theatre Seats 

and paid the price of a cushioned orchestra chair, would 
you be content with the discomfort of a hard bench in 
the gallery? You know you would not. 

Then, in buying a High-Grade Motorcycle, why accept 
it if fitted with a "hard bench" when, by insistence, you 
can obtain what you are entitled to, the Perfect Com- 
fort of a 

PERSONS CHAMPION SADDLE. 




PeiisoNsCHAMPION Motor $txt m 
lwctmu WIDTH 12M Dittoed THjmc&h- 
wt to Straddle Frame Bitot Confound 5wax.sl 
. torwnio*. Side Sww or SojutAKiNO imA^t'o^s 

PERSONS SADDLES ARE ALL CUSHIONED SEATS 

Cushioned by Compound Springs and Oak-tanned Steer 
hides. Every Dealer or Rider who pays the price of a 
High-Grade Machine is entitled to a PERSONS. If he 
takes less he should pay less for his machine. The Wise 
Dealers everywhere specify and recommend PERSONS 
Saddles above all others. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

THE PERSONS MANUFACTURING CO., 

WORCESTER, MASS. 



PFANSTIEHL COILS 

FOR MOTORCYCLES 




ARE 

Guaranteed Absolutely 
for 5 Years 

Our patented system of Pancake winding explains 
this, and also the wonderful efficiency of all Pfanstiehl 
Coils. 

Three reasons for our great popularity : 

INDESTRUCTIBILITY 

RELIABILITY 

PRICE 



Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory 

NORTH CHICAGO, ILL. 



Motorcycle Trip Cyclometers 



Made specif, lly 
for Motorcycles. 
Made larger and 
stronger to with- 
stand the rough 
usage to which 
it is subjected to 
on the Motor- 
cycle. 



Fully 
Guaranteed. 



Supplied for 26" 
or 28" wheels. 




With the new 
adjustable 
bracket (which 
is regularly sup- 
plied) The Vee- 
der Motorcycle 
Trip Cyclometer 
can be attsched 
to all makes of 
Motorcycles. 

Price $3.00 

complete with 
Motorcycle 
Striker. 



THE VEEDER MFG. CO., 

42 Sartfeant St., - Hartford, Conn. 

Makers of Odometers, Cyclometers, Counters, Tacho- 
meters, Tachodometers and fine castings. 



THE GENUINE WATAWATA 




INCREASES YOUR POWER. INCREASES YOUR SPEED. 

REDUCES YOUR EXPENSE. 

One Inch width, per Inch, - - Ten cents. 

Seven-eighths Inch width, per Inch, - Nine ** 

"Belt Cost" is determined by the number of miles a dollar's 
worth of belting drives you. It a belt costing you five cents per 
inch drives you for one thousand miles, that is at the rate of 
fifty cents per inch or six dollars per FOOT FOR TEN 
THOUSAND MILES. 

FUTURE IT OUT YOURSELF. 
The Genu i he Watawata Belts are good for from eight to 
fifteen thousand miles, and so are the cheapest belts on earth. 
S,ooo MILES WITH FORECARRIAGEI! 
Mr. G. S. writes: "Since purchasing in June, I have run the 
Watawata 5,000 miles on a j>4 Bat, mostly with forecarriage 
fitted." 

10,000 MILES AND STILL GOING!! 
Mr. H. R. Fowler, Birmingham, writes: "I have one of your 
Watawata belts which has now been ridden about 10,000 miles. " 
A MINISTER'S EXPERIENCE. 
The Rev. H. B. Davies writes: "The J^-inch belt on my 3 h. p. 
has done well over 7,000 miles this season, including 1,270 miles 
in the six days' record. Their immunity from trouble has made 
me an enthusiastic supporter of your belts." 

2.750 MILES WITHOUT REPAIRING. 
Mr. T. Morrison Gar rood writes: "The ^-inch Watawata has 
already run some 2,750 miles without tightening, and it has 
greatly increased the pace of my machine. 

A Fastener free with each Belt. Send Money Order with 
Order for prompt service, to 

MAJESTIC MANUFACTURING CO., 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

New York and Brooklyn Retail, F. A. Baker & Co. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, 1909. 




Grinnell Auto Gloves 

are made of "Reindeere" and CoUskin 
- the sollesl and most serviceable of 
filove leathers. They are 

VENTILATED 

by rows of tiny holes across the back, 
too small to admit dust. The gauntlet is 
kept from safifiinfi by the patented 

"RIST-FIT" 

a ■' V" of soft leather set into the cuff, which allows a 
mig, comiortable fit at the wrist. 

ATTENTION, DEALERS , No other Auto Glove is made so 
wen or possesses the superior features of the G.innell 
Glove No glove Is so widely known. Your customers 
want them. If you are not handling them, write us for 
prices and terms. 

fe M0RRIS0N-RICEERMFG.G0. 

27 Broad St.. Grinnell, Iowa 

Originators and Patentees of 
"Ventilated" and "RUt-Fit" Glove* 










Catalogue 
explains all. 



THE HEITGER 
MOTORCYCLE 
CARBURETER 

is giving satisfaction to 
numbers of manufactur- 
ers and hundreds of 
riders. Why not try 
one ? Satisfaction guar- 
anteed or money back. 

HEITGER 
CARBURETER CO. 

208 W. South Street, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



ERIE » H. P. 2-SPEED MODEL 




D I f\ 17 D Q osk f° r our 36 page accessory cat- 
I\ 1 mJ d I\ O alog and free copy of new magazine 



MOTORCYCLE EQUIPMENT CO., 



HAMMONDSPORT 

N. Y. 



LET THE MOTOR DO THE WORK 

A MOTOBCYCLE can be made quickly FROM ANY BICYCLE by 
using our 2 H. P. Motor Outfit. Unequalled for POWER. SPEED 
and RELIABILITY. Anyone can easily attach our Outfit by follow- 
ing the directions we send with each Attachment. Best material and 
workmanship. 



FULLY 
GUARANTEED. 

Immediate d e- 
llvery. Send for 
Catalog B. 



Shaw Nig. (o. 

Oalaiburg. Kansas 





ARE YOU TIRED 

of using cheap belts ? 
There is no satisfaction or 
economy in them. 

Heath's Challenge Belt 

Absolutely most efficient, 
durable and economical. 
Our first belt, over year old, 
7,000 miles, still in use. 
All sizes "V" or flat. 

S. F. HEATH & CO. 

887 Boylston Street. Boston. Mam. 



Diamond 
Motorcycle Chains 



Because or their powerful driving 
qualities and extraordinary lasting 
service. Diamond Chains make ideal 
drives lor motorcycles. Through 
their smooth, positive performance 
they protect delicate motorcycle 
mechanism, and reduce to the mini- 
mum thecost of machine maintenance. 

By right of superior material and 
distinctive features of manufacture. 
Diamond Chains have for eighteen 
years maintained the (highest stand- 
ard of chain efficiency. 

Sold by Jobbers and dealers 
everywhere. 



Diamond Chain 6 Mfg. Company 

No. 251 W. Georgia St., Indianapolis, Ind. 



44 



IDEAL," 

MOTORCYCLE OIL 

Is selected for endurance runs. It has 
a reputation for perfect scores in the 
east. Better use the best all the time. 

SEND FOR BOOKLET 



W. S. SHEPPARD, BWA&& 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



79 



NEW ERA AUTO-CYCLE 

Two Speeds, Free Motor, Hand Cranked Motor 




The New Era Gas Engine Company 

22 DALE AVE.. DAYTON. OHIO 



INDIAN 

AND 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON 
MOTORCYCLES 

PARTS. SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS 

Send for Largest Motorcycle Accessory Catalogue Ever Issued 

Great Bargains in Second-Hand MOTORCYCLES 

$50 up Twins $150 up 
F. B. WIDMAYER CO. 

2312 Broadway NEW YORK 



WHIPPLE 



THE MOTORCYCLE MAN 



The best in the world is none too good 
for our customers. Motorcycles and ac- 
cessories at lowest prices. Pierce 4 
cylinder, $350; Indians, nine models, 
$175 to $325. Good second hand, all 
kinds, down to $40. Send for our sun- 
dry catalog. 



WHIPPLE 



THE MOTORCYCLE MAN 

260 W. Jackion blvd. CHICAGO 




Br C* Two Speed and 
• ** ^ Free Engine Gear 

Easily attached to any chain-driven 
motorcycle of the countershaft type. Puts 
your mount in the up-to-date class with- 
out remodeling. Fifty per cent, reduction 
from the normal speed, or free engine, at 
the will of rider. 
One lever only. Starts from slow speed 
without jolt or jar. The ideal equipment for a tricar. 
Write for particulars. You will be interested, pleas- 
antly surprised. So write to-day. 

Bushnell (EL Cannon, 

1268 K. SOtH PI. CUvaland, O. 



MAIL THIS TO-DAY 

EARLE L OVINGTON. 
President F. A. M., 

2232 Broadway, New York, 
Dear Sir : I (eel that I ought to be a member of the 
F. A. M. We must have a national organization to 
promote motorcycling and to guard and care (or its 
many interests. Please send me particulars. 

(Signed) 

State 

City 

Street 




, HANSEN'S 

// AUTO and DRIVING 

/ J£\ GLOVES 

/ fitting, V: 

uonderfully soft and pliable 




and wear Hke iron. 
Write today for hand- 
some descriptive price- 
list and circular. 

O.C.HANSEN MFG. CO. 

337 East Water Street 
MILWAUKEE 



Tire Troubles? 

USE PERMANIT 




For particulars write or send 
53 cents for a sample carton 
which is sufficient for a bicycle 
tire. 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 

Guarantee Policy furnished to every 

user of "PERMANIT." 

The Adolf Karl Co. 

(Inc.) 

243 Washington Street 

NEWARK, N. J. 




The Baby "Breeze" 

CARBURETER 

For Motorcycles, made of 
polished aluminum, small parts 
of brass, weighs fourteen 
ounces; small in size, big in re- 
sults; price ten dollars. Dur- 
able, light and strong — a hand* 
ful only — special connections for 
popular machines included in 
price; 80 to 95 miles per gallon 
under normal road conditions. 
Write for special literature. 
Send ten cents for our Engine 
Trouble Text-book, 



One-half Actual 5ne 



Breeze Carbureter Company 

266 Haliey St. Newark. N. J. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 1, l'X)9. 




Order your motorcycle equipped wtlh 

G & J ROUGH-RIDER GRIPS 

Mode ol Rubber. They relieve Ihe vibration. 
Price. SI. 50 Per Pair 

For Sole by All Dealers. 

G & J TIRE CO. 

INDIANAPOLIS 



McLaughlin & Ashley 

206 W. 76th St.. New York. 

N. S. U. MOTORCYCLES 

1 Immediate delivery in all new models. 

1 Bargains in 2nd hand machines. 
Supplies and accessories at prices that 
are right. Repairs promptly and effect- 
ively made. Storage. 



TORPEDO MOTORCYCLES 

WHY HESITATE? Unless you ride 
the BEST you cannot be a SATISFIED 
MOTORCYCLIST. You know there can 
be but one BEST and that is the TOR- 
PEDO. Write for catalog and agent's terms. 

The Hornecker Motor Mfg. Co. 
Geneseo. III., U. S. A. 



ADVERTISE IN THE MART. 

2 CENTS A WORD 

IT SELLS THE STUFF 



Motorcycles in Stock 

3k H. P. Single Cylinders 

With Bosch Magneto, $225 

7 H. P. Twin Cylinders 

New York Headquarters. 8 W. 60th St. 




C. O. T. Gum-Gim. Ask your dealer how nicely it 

repair* digouts in your auto shoe. For sale by jobbers, 

CHvS. o. TlNr.LEV ft CO., Rahway. ft. J. 




IMPROVED Belt Hook. Detachable roller Jink 
and self-locking screw. Price 25 cents. 

PROSPECT MOTOR C6MPANY, 1900 Oraataf, N. Y. 



— ^OTOR(YCLE- 

The British Motor Cycle 

NEWSPAPER 

American subscription rate, $2.60 per annum | 
"Tha Motor Cycle," 20 Tudor St., London, E.I 



-THIEM 1909- 



If you or your friends or your friends friends are in- 
terested in the latest and best improved Mot rcycles, 
regardless of how highly you regard other makes — do 
not purchase a Motorcycle until you have written us 
for Our Latest Catalogue describing in detail, all 
about Our New and Original Models. Best Agent 
Proposition to Date. 

THIEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
Box 498, Minneapolis, Minn. 



THE MINERVA TWIN, 

with Bosch MnOneto, Spring Forks, Double 
Grip Control and Continental Non-Skid Tires, 
is the best for the money on the market to-day 



5 H. P. 

8 H. P. 



nplete $300.00 
K 32S.00 



GEO. V. LYONS MOTOR CO., 

Broadway, near 87th St., New York City 



9 



American X Agency=$ 



We have the best money- 
making Agency Proposition 
yet. We give a discount that 
will make you money. Write 
today. 

American Motorcycle Co. 

Wells and Stfailler Sts.. Chleaco, IIL 



NEW EDITION— JUST OUT 

"CONSTRUCTION, MANAGEMENT 

AND CARE OF MOTORCYCLES" 

Revised and Enlarged— 60 Pages. 25 Cents 

Contents.— The Motor, Mechanical Valves, Working of 
Valves, General Motor Parts, Twin Cylinder Motors. Motor 
Tips, Removing and Replacing Cylinder, Overheating, Piston 
Rings, Knocking and Pounding, Timing, Weak Springs, Life of 
Motors, Care of Valves, Lubrication, Ignition, Ignition Troubles, 
Trouble Chart, Magnetos, Carburetor, Transmission, Spring 
Forks, Tires, Two Speed, Attachable Outfits, Belt Don'ts, Other 
Don'ts, Cause of Breakdowns, Points to Remember. 

MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO. 



299 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 



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OTORCYCL 



ILLUSTRATED 



^ 



<. y 




August 15, 1909 



PUBLISHED BY THE MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



INDIANAPOLIS GETS F. A. M. PRESIDENCY 

FRED WILLIS NAMED AS THE HEAD OF THE FEDERATION, AND LE ROY COOK, OF 
NEW YORK, AS ITS SECRETARY— FOUR SESSIONS OF THE CONVENTION, WELL 
ATTENDED AND INTERESTING— SECRETARY AND CHAIRMAN OF COM- 
PETITION COMMITTEE TO HAVE STENOGRAPHIC HELP— $400 
FOR NEW MEMBERS— TO REVISE CONSTITUTION AND 
AFFILIATE WITH THE AUTO CYCLE UNION. 



WELL attended and wonderfully enthusiastic, the F. A. M. 
1909 meet at Indianapolis, with its convention, endur- 
ance run, speedway races and entertainment of visitors, closed 
Saturday night with the election to the presidency of Mr. 
Fred Willis, of the Hersey-Willis Company, whose home 
and place of business is in the capital of the Hoosicr 
State. The selection of Mr. Willis proved not only a 
worthy crowning of a week's series of important events, 
but, as well, the establishment of a new precedent, the 
election of a western executive. That the Indiana motor- 
cyclists deserve to call the F. A. M. president their own 
was proven time and time again during the week. It was 
shown that motorcycledom in that part of the country is 
in a position to call upon men of unusual executive 
ability, unbounded enthusiasm, and the quality of doing 
things as they ought to be done. The arrangements had 
been made so as to measure almost to the point of per- 
fection, and while one important feature, the speedway 
races, fell flat, it certainly was not because G. H. Hamil- 
ton and his fellow-workers had not done all within reason 
to make every portion of the programme entirely success- 
ful and wholly satisfactory to the hundreds of F. A. M. 
members who came from all parts of the country to make 
the most of the fine programme which those in charge of 
the meet outlined and subsequently carried out. except 
as to one hitch, entirely beyond their control.. 
The New Officials. 

The government of the F. A. M. during the current year 
will be the privilege and responsibility of the following: 
President, Fred Willis, Indianapolis; Eastern vice-presi- 
dent. C. C Wilbur. Keene. N. H. : Western vice-president, 
Charles Wyatt, Indianapolis ; Southern vice-president, E. M. 
Hughes, Louisville; Pacific vice-president, C. M. Frink, 
Los Angeles; Secretary. Le Roy Cook, New York; treas- 
urer, Dr. G. B. Gibson, Wcstboro, Mass. 

Dr. J. P. Thornley, who is now chairman of the com- 
petitive committee, will in all probability be reappointed. 

Mr. Willis was nominated by Mr. Ovington, w T hile Mr. 
Griffith nominated Dr. C. J. Berrick. of Buffalo. Speeches 
were made in behalf of both candidates, whereupon Dr. 
Thornley, who had taken the chair at Mr. Ovington's 
request, named as tellers Eugene C. Kircherer and J. Leo 
Sauer, both of New York. When the ballots had been 
counted, and it was found that Mr. Willis had been elected 
by a vote of 84 to 37, the defeated candidate moved to 



make the election unanimous. This was done, to the tune 
of hearty cheers, skillfully engineered by Mr. Ovington. 
The president-elect responded felicitously, proving himself 
a gentleman of a pleasant personality, a fund of good ideas, 
and one possessed of both executive ability and the faculty 
of reasoning logically. 

Le Roy Cook Made Secretary. 

There was only one nominee for this office, Le Roy 
Cook, secretary of the New York Motorcycle Club, and 
formerly editor of Motorcycle Illustrated. Mr. Cook 
was one of the competitors in the Endurance Run, and 
won the admiration of all who witnessed or heard of his 
plucky performance in the face of most discouraging ob- 
stacles. Cook's election was made by acclamation, the sec- 
retary casting the ballot. 

The vice-presidency of the Western District went to 
Charles Wyatt, president of the Indiana Motorcycle Club. 
Mr. Wyatt's opponent was Frederic B. Hart, of Chicago, 
who, because of his capable presentation of arguments 
during debate on the convention floor, had been prevailed 
upon by his friends to stand for the office. The vote was, 
Wyatt. 5Q; Hart. 35, and upon Mr. Hart's motion, the elec- 
tion of his opponent was made unanimous. 

The Indianapolis boys almost succeeded in capturing 
another office. Had it not been for the self-sacrifice of 
Harry Graff, who declined the nomination for treasurer, he 
would undoubtedly have been chosen, for he admittedly 
had the votes. As it was. Dr. Gibson was re-elected. The 
nominees for vice-presidents of the Eastern, Southern and 
Pacific Coast districts were unopposed, and in each case 
the election was by ballot cast by the secretary. 

The Opening Session. 

At the convention's opening, Friday morning, after Sec- 
retary Wehman had read the minutes of last year's session 
in New York, President Ovington, in his annual report, 
called attention to the fact that the membership of the 
Federation had almost doubled during the past twelve- 
month, that a healthy interest was being evinced in the 
development of the organization, and that the large at- 
tendance at this meeting, among other things, justified him 
in predicting still greater growth and more active interest 
during the current year. 

First of all. the retiring president recommended radical 
changes in the constitution and by-laws, particularly to 



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£ 


BIG THINGS 


^E»*A 


AT THE 


KW 


F. A. M. 1909 MEET 


wjV 


AT INDIANAPOLIS 


Prcsidcnt-Elcct Willis. 


AUGUST 10-14 



ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

President, Fred Willis, Indianapolis; Vice-President for the Eastern District, C. C. Wilbur, Keene, N. H.; 
Vice-President for the Western District, Charles Wyatt, Indianapolis; Vice-President for the Southern Dis- 
trict, E. M. Hughes, Louisville, Ky.; Vice-President for the Pacific Coast District, C. M. Frink, Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Secretary, LeRoy Cook, New York; Treasurer, Dr. G. B. Gibson, Westboro, Mass. 

THE NEW COMPETITION RULES. 

Three Classes— Private Owner, Trade Rider and Professional. Amateur Status of the Trade Rider es- 
tablished. Possibility of breaking away from the A. A. U. eliminated. Provisions to enable American amateurs 
to compete abroad without being professionalized. Only professionals permitted to change machines during 
any one track event. Stock machine defined. Corrupt practices clause strengthened. 

THE ENDURANCE RUN. 

From Cleveland to Columbus, the first day, and from Columbus to Indianapolis the second. Ninety-six 
started and thirty-eight finished with perfect scores. Nineteen makes of machines were represented.^ Arrange- 
ments perfect; thousands of enthusiastic spectators; one of the most gruelling tests to which motor vehicles 
have ever been subjected. 

BUSINESS OF THE CONVENTION. 

Committee of twenty-five to be appointed to propose a complete revision of the constitution and by-laws. 
Chairman of Competition Committee and the Secretary were authorized to employ stenographic help. An ap- 
propriation of $400.00 to be used to increase the membership. Arrangements to be made to affiliate with the 
A. C. U M cf England, with a view to having international competition. 

SPEEDWAY RACES. 

The big track was not ready and only one day's races were held. The track was so rough that record 
riding was out of the question; in fact, the danger was so great that there were few starters in each event. 
Jake De Rosier was seriously injured by a fall in the ten mile professional. 

ENTERTAINMENT OF VISITORS. 

About five hundred F. A. M. members participated in the Meet. Three hundred of these were in attend- 
ance at the first session of the convention. The Meet Club did all in its power to make the stay of its guests a 
pleasant one, and it was the consensus of opinion that the Indiana Club had achieved unqualified success in 
that particular. 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



the end of giving every member proper representation, and 
of reducing the present excessive prerogatives of the 
president. Subsequently this suggestion was acted upon 
in the form of a resolution, which was unanimously 
adopted, authorizing the incoming president to appoint 
a committee of twenty-five to make the necessary changes, 
and thereupon to notify each member of a special meet- 
ing to be held as soon as possible, at which the revised 
constitution and by-laws may be acted upon. Incidentally, 
Mr. Ovington called attention to the fact that the only 
rival organization of the F. A. M. was now practically 
defunct. 

Another suggestion made by the outgoing executive was 
that a committee be appointed to arrange to have manu- 
factured metal replicas of the F. A. M. emblem, to be 
attached to machines; also cloth designs to be worn on 
sweaters, caps, etc., and to be sold to the members at 
practically cost. 

With respect to the affiliation with the Auto Cycle Union 
of England, also proposed by Mr. Ovington, the conven- 
tion authorized the incoming president to appoint a com- 
mittee of three for the purpose of bringing about such a 
connection, and, as a result, international competitions. 

In pursuance of another suggestion contained in the 
president's annual report, the convention decided to allow 
both the chairman of the competition committee and the 
secretary of the Federation, the privilege of engaging 
stenographic services at a cost not to exceed $10 a week 
each. 

Mr. Ovington expressed the thanks of the Federation to 
Motorcycle Illustrated for inserting, free of charge, the 
membership advertisement which, he declared, had brought 
hundreds of replies. Mr. Ovington also thought it would 
be well to make this paper the official organ of the Fed- 
eration. The editor of Motorcycle Illustrated being 
called upon, he explained to the chairman and convention 
that it was best for both the F. A. M. and the paper that 
no such arrangements be made, simply because both the 
organization and the paper should be perfectly free and 
independent. Mr. Sauer moved, however, that the secre- 
tary be directed to periodically prepare F. A. M. matter 
for such publications as were willing to use it. He as- 
sured the convention that Motorcycle Illustrated would 
publish official Federation material to the extent of a page 
per issue. 

Mr. Ovington and Mr. F. P. Prial, the latter chairman of 
the membership committee, and whose report was read 
later, were substantially in agreement that at least 25 per 
cent, of the funds now in the treasury of the organization 
should be applied towards increasing its membership. Mr. 
Prial's report declared that the 1910 slogan of the 
F. A. M. should be "Ten thousand members or nothing." 
Pursuant to the recommendations of the president and 
the chairman of the membership committee, the conven- 
tion authorized the expenditure of $400 by this committee, 
said outlay to be devoted entirely to the purpose of enlarg- 
ing the membership of the Federation. 

In concluding his report, Mr. Ovington thanked the 
other officers and the members of the Federation for 
their help and encouragement, and informed the conven- 
tion that, owing to the pressure of his business interests, 
he would under no circumstances accept a re-election. 
The demonstration accorded the retiring president when 
he had concluded the reading of his report, must have 
pleased him far more than could have any formal vote of 
confidence. 

Eastern Vice-President Buffington reported a member- 
ship of 258 in his territory; also the appointment of W. F. 



Mann and E. L. Estabrook as commissioners of Massa- 
chusetts and Maine, respectively. Mr. Buffington also re- 
ported that at the organization meeting of the Eastern 
District the reinstatement of Mr. W. T. Marsh, of the 
American Motor Company, had been voted favorably upon. 
Later the convention took up this matter, and the rein- 
statement of Mr. Marsh was directed by a unanimous 
vote. 

Mr. Hart called attention to the fact that, owing to a 
train of peculiar circumstances, the Western District had 
no vice-president, and was in a rather disorganized state. 
He explained, moreover, that in several important particu- 
lars, the constitution and by-laws of the Western District 
conflicted with those of the Federation, and he suggested 
that this matter be carefully examined into by the com- 
mittee to be appointed to propose changes in the national 
constitution. 

R. A. Holmes, vice-president of the Pacific Coast Dis- 
trict, reported that he believed the district officials should 
have more authority. Chairman Thornley declared that 
chaos in the rules would result, and that while there was 
cause for complaint about prevailing conditions, this would 
be removed when, with the assistance of a stenographer, 
he was able to do his work with greater dispatch and 
more thoroughness. 

There was no report from E. Y. White, vice-president 
of the Southern District. 

Treasurer Gibson reported the following : Receipts, $3,839.07 ; 
expenditures, $3,415.40; balance, $423.67, with $187.85 re- 
ceived from Secretary Wehman after the treasurer's books 
had been balanced. President Ovington explained that 
the secretary's accounts had been brought entirely up to 
date, and that, though there had been a little unpleasant- 
ness, a proper adjustment of everything had been made. 

Dr. J. P. Thornley, chairman of the competition com- 
mitteee, reported his receipts and expenditures, urged that 
he have stenographic assistance, and explained some of 
the troubles he has had in the appointment of referees. 
He held that all things else being equal, the fairest man 
was likely to make the most enemies, and that it was 
hard to decide just how to take the complaints and protests 
which he is accustomed to receive now and then, regard- 
ing this or that referee. He promised simply to do his 
utmost to treat everyone fairly. Dr. Thornley's remarks 
were very cordially received. 

Dwight Patterson, of New York, chairman of the legal 
committee, reported that owing to the illness of his 
father, he would be unable to be present. His report was 
read by L. H. Cornish. The report was similar to his 
able article in the August 1 issue of this paper. In addi- 
tion; he cited the test case of the city of St. Louis 
against L. J. Mueller, in which the presiding judge ren- 
dered a decision that, under the law of the State of Mis- 
souri, a motorcycle is not a motor vehicle. Since this 
case has not been appealed to a court of record, the de- 
cision could not be regarded as a very important 
precedent. 

In this connection it may be noted that, since Mr. Patterson 
wrote his report, the above decision has been reversed by the 
Attorney General. 

As an evidence of its appreciation of their services, the 
convention voted an appropriation of $100 wherewith to 
purchase two cups, to cost $50 each, for the retiring presi- 
dent and secretary. 

The secretary of the Springfield, Mass., Club filed an 
application in favor of that city as the place for the toto 
meet. Of course, this matter will not be acted upon until 
next summer. 



PASADENA, Cal.— Owing to the speed laws in South 
Pasadena, limiting the speed of automobiles along 
the boulevard between Pasadena and Los Angeles, two 
motorcops have been placed there. 



ONE of the recent converts to tri-car riding is J. G. 
Phelps Stokes, of Stamford, the well-known socialist. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stokes are to be seen almost every clear day, 
riding in and about their home city. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



## 


THE ENDURANCE RUN 


## 



THE most notable motorcycle contest ever held in the (Reliance), 949; B. V. Chambers, Rome, Ga. (R-S), 973; 
United States, viewed from the standpoint of the number V. H. Moss, Rome, Ga. (R-S), 990; Clarence R. Bailey, 
of entries and starters, was the Endurance Run conducted Binghamton, N. Y. (Reliance), 952; LeRoy Baker, Ham- 
August 12 and 13, under the auspices of the F. A. M. One mondsport, N. Y. (Marvel), 986; R. J. Buxe, Louisville 
hundred and three had filed their entries, and of this number (R-S), 990; P. J. Kuhn, Louisville (R-S), 956. 
ninety-six faced the starter, at Cleveland, early Tuesday The following get bronze medals for finishing not more 
morning. Besides, the contest was well representative of the than two hours late: M. E. Gale, Angola, N. Y. (Emblem), 
trade, nineteen different makes of machines having been en- 856; Charles H. Drude, Detroit (N. S. U.), 682. 
tered. Finally, the run was managed to the point of per- Viewed from the standpoint of the reliability of the 
fection, the route was well chosen, the weather conditions machines, a table showing the number of starters, number 
were ideal, the competition close and interesting, and the en- of perfect scores, and the percentage of points scored 
thusiasm among both riders and spectators was far in excess of the total possible in each case, is printed below: 
of the anticipations of the most hopeful among those con- Tota l p i nts x ota i p j nts p cr - 
Cerned in the Success of the meet. . Machine. Started. Perfect. Possible. Scored, centage. 

Curtiss 1 1 1,000 1,000 100 

The Honor Men. ^ mblc ? 1 4 1 4,000 2,842 .71 

excelsior 5 4 5,000 4,000 .80 

Perfect scores were made by thirty-eight competitors, Harley-Davidson .... 7 4 7,000 5,933 .84 

divided as follows: &*£ ;;;;;;;;;;;•; 2 \ 12 *;•££ l *> 9Sl 6 - 66 

Private Owners, Single Cylinder Class.— R. E. Un- Marvel .... '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 1 <> i.'oo^ 986 .98 

derhill, Chicago (Harley-Davidson); L. Wipperman, Buffalo Merkel 7 4 7tQ oo 6,908 .98 

(Excelsior). iL^F™ 3 ' 3 '°° I * 000 11 

Private Owners, Twin Cylinder Class.— C A. Kent, Erie, NS .u ..\\\\\\\\\\ 6 \ oiooo **2 7 6 

Pa. (Merkel); J. A. Turner, Chicago (Merkel); Don Klark, Pierce 3 1 3 [ooo 1,000 .33 

Detroit (N. S. U.) ; B. C. Ogden, Ashland, Ky. (Indian); ^7 cle « ° i»°oo ... 

A. G. Chappie, New York (Indian); A. H. Crocker, Chi- £&??///////. 1 '.'. 1 15 3 l \Z°o ITsl f* 

cago (Thor); R. D. Sporleder, Wawatosa, Wis. (Indian); Thor 8 3 8,000 5)925 .74 

R. W. DuSell, Aurora (Thor). Torpedo 1 1 ,, oo 1,000 100 

Trade Riders, Single Cylinder Class.— John McCarver, YaIe 4 x 4 '°°° *' 973 ' 7A 

Indianapolis (Excelsior); A. G. Lyon, Chicago (Excelsior; The Start from Cleveland. 
Joseph De Salvo, Chicago (Excelsior) ; J. G De Gruchy, The machines were marked under the direction of Mr. Ham- 
Columbus (Thor); George A. Heil, Angola (Emblem); S. ilton, on Monday afternoon. None of the parts were sealed, 
Lacy Crolius, Milwaukee (Harley-Davidson); Frank Aller- as, owing to the unexpectedly large entry list, it was found 
man, Milwaukee (Harley-Davidson); Walter Davidson, impossible to do this. As it was, a half dozen men were 
Milwaukee (Harley-Davidson); S. J. Chubbuck, Toledo kept busy all the afternoon getting the various mounts in 
(Yale); J. C. Turpin, Dayton (New Era); G. W. Lyon, shape. Just before supper, Hamilton called the boys together, 
Chicago (Indian); C. S. Hinckley, Aurora (Indian); Wil- with a view to explaining anything that may have presented 
Ham Staudt, Chicago (R-S); Glenn C. Crandall, Akron the slightest difficulty. He advised them all to be ready not 
(R-S); W. Bewley, Reading (R-S); Guy M. Green, Chi- later than half past four, in order to be sure to get their ma- 
cago (M. M.). chines down to the starting place on time. Most of them 

Trade Riders, Twin Cylinder Class. — F. E. Wilkinson, followed his suggestions, with the result that there was no 

Providence (Indian); B. A. Swenson, Providence (Indian); sleep for anybody in the Hollenden after that hour. It is need- 

P B. Whitney, Cleveland (Indian) ; L. J. Mueller, Cleveland less to explain that, with five score riders running as many 

(Indian); Wendell White, Pottstown (Merkel); Albert H. machines on the stands to give them a final test, it was quite 

Peters, Buffalo (Torpedo); E. M. Hughes, Louisville (In- out of the question for any of the hotel guests to attempt to 

dian); A. G. Schmidt, Sharpsburg, Pa. (Indian); F. L. continue wooing Morpheus much after sunrise. 

Hunt, Rochester (Pierce); Charles Spencer, Springfield Promptly at six o'clock the first riders were started off. 

(Indian). They were John McCarver, A. G. Lyon, Joseph De Salvo and 

Well-earned gold medals were awarded to each one of Dr. Harold J. Levis, all mounted on Excelsiors. One minute 

the above perfect scorers. The following, with upwards of later, four of the Indian tribe, F. E Wilkinson, B. A. Swenson, 

000 points each, won silver medals: Wm. Tuebner, Potts- P. B. Whitney and L* J. Mueller, were sent away. Seven of 

town (Merkel), 990; Chas. D. Foht, Erie (Merkel), 943; H. these eight reached all the checking stations, all the controls, 

J. Kiefler, Buffalo (Kiefler), 936; John C. Glass, Angola and their final destination at Indianapolis on time. Levis was 

(Emblem), 986; H. H. Gansen, Buffalo (Indian), 997; W. the only one who fell by the wayside. Owing to a broken 

J. Lister, Cleveland (Harley-Davidson), 975; A. W. Lees, exhaust valve, he was forced to give up at the first control, 

Cleveland (Harley-Davidson), 958; C. W. McDonald, Ash- which was at Wooster, 54 miles out from Cleveland. Levis 

land, Ky. (Indian), 984; Robert S. Gray, Cleveland may be excused, however, in view of the fact that he had 

(N. S. U.), 910; W. W. Ingram, Rutland, 111. (Yale), 090; just completed a ride from Rochester to Chicago, a distance 

George W. Reinhold, Philadelphia (Yale), 983; E. L. of about 675 miles, in two days and three hours, having had 

Morse, Columbus (New Era), 975; J. S. Tormey, Chicago no opportunity to clean up his machine. 

(Thor), 975; O. J. Oberwegner, Chicago (Thor), 975; The balance of the ninety-six starters were sent off in fours 

George H. Squier, Gucago (Thor), 975; Jack G. Rice, at intervals of one minute, the last bunch, including L. R. 

Indianapolis (R-S), 950; II. B. Lyons, New York Baker (Marvel), Dr. James P. Thornley (Indian), R. J. 

(N. S. U.), 007; J. F. McLaughlin, New York (N. S. U.), Buxe (R-S), and T. J. iKuhns (R-S), going away at 6:25. 

97Q: J. A. Schuster, Columbus (Merkel), 975; C. K. Ball, The first four were due at Indianapolis at 5:26 Wednesday 

Owego, N. Y. (Reliance), 986; Frank Walling, Owego, afternoon, the last four at 5:51, and the others, in groups of 

N. Y. (Reliance), 982; Sanford Davidson, Owego, N. Y. four, at one-minute intervals, between those times. 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Between Cleveland and Coshocton. 

The riding was easy enough until the outskirts of Cleve- 
land were reached. Here, for an eighth of a mile, the road- 
bed was in a horrible condition, and the boys got their first 
taste of what was in anticipation. Ten miles further on, the 
road was being repaired for one and one-half miles, between 
Strongville and Brunswick. It is between these two places 
that one of the worst hills is located. It is not a long ascent, 
but the road-bed is full of ruts, and more than half of the 
riders found it necessary to push their mounts up to the top. 
From Strongville to Wooster the road averages from fair to 
comparatively poor, through rolling country. 

The first two men who experienced trouble were Harold 
B. Alderman, of Buffalo, on a Thor, and Albert H. Peters, 
of the same place, who rode a Torpedo. The former, hidden 
in the dust, was struck by two other riders, and sustained a 
broken saddle. He went on, but gave up after reaching 
Richmond Wednesday afternoon. Peters, in riding over some 
of the rough ground just outside the limits of Cleveland, broke 
several spokes in his rear wheel. He finally decided to ride 
back in order to procure a new wheel. He did this and 
returned in time to check in at Wooster, and to complete the 
run with a perfect score, a rather remarkable performance. 

Two Machines Disabled. 

H. R. Lock, on an Emblem, was the next one passed. He 
was stalled because of a broken valve. He completed the first 
day's journey, but did not check out at Columbus. Fourteen 
miles out, Erwin G. Baker, riding an Indian, reported that 
one of his cylinders was missing fire, and, further on, Herbert 
J. D'Errice, also on a Springfield machine, stated laconically 
that he couldn't "get her to climb." Neither of these two 
got beyond Coshocton. At Medina and Seville, fully thirty of 
the riders were ahead of their schedule, and ninety-four out of 
the ninety-six checked in at Wooster. 

Over Fairly Good Roads. 

The distance from Wooster to the noon control at Coshocton 
is 41 miles. It had rained in this district the night previous, 
and the dust was not at all as bad as it was found to be 
along practically all of the remainder of the route. In fact, 
the riders experienced more trouble on this account than was 
due to any other single cause. Elsewhere, the dust rose in 
clouds wherever a rider was making more than ten miles 
an hour, the conditions being such that many minor acci- 
dents were caused by blinded men running into deep ruts, 
over culverts and into ditches by the roadside, or failing to 
notice sharp turns ahead. In this particular section, how- 
ever, the roads were in very good condition, and the traveling 
comparatively easy. There were several short hills, and one 
or two long ones, the most difficult to negotiate being a wind- 
ing one-mile ascent near Clark, eighty miles from Cleveland. 

It was when approaching Keene, 80 miles away from the 
start, that the Kokomo machine, containing Lon Spraker, of 
the Kokomo Rubber Company, a representative of the Con- 
solidated Mfg. Co.. and the editors of the Bicycling World and 
Motorcycle Illustrated, broke down. The machine was 
stalled nine miles away from Coshocton all the afternoon, until 
a rough substitute had finally been made for one of the front 
springs, which had broken completely in half when the auto 
crossed a deep rut in the road. The machine was brought 
into Coshocton on its own power and stored there over night. 
Those who occupied it took the train to Columbus. They 
did not reach the Hollenden Hotel until nearly three o'clock 
Wednesday morning. 

Arthur B. Porter, on an Indian, experienced disablement 
between Wooster and Coshocton because of a broken exhaust 
valve spring. He reached Columbus, however, but did not 
start the next morning. W. T. Morse, one of the New Era 
team, ran into a wall while negotiating a sharp turn just 
north of Coshocton. His nose was bruised and his face badly 
scratched up, but he managed to continued the journey, finish- 
ing with a score of 975. Kenyon Y. Taylor, on a Pierce, had a 
similar accident, and although he himself was not hurt, his 



machine was so badly damaged as to put him out of the con- 
test. The bridge at which Taylor met with his accident 
bought several other riders to grief, but none of them was 
hurt. 

Green Runs Into Wall. 

Guy M. Green, on an M. M. machine, in an effort to avoid 
running into a rider ahead of him, dashed into a stone wall 
and, although himself unhurt, badly bent one of the forks of 
his machine. Green lost no time at the controls, however, and 
finished with a perfect score. 

W. Brewster, on a Twin M. M., had trouble twelve miles 
north of Coshocton, and withdrew. 

H. B. Lyon was delayed at various intervals owing to his 
rear tire's picking up a nail. Lyon, however, reached all of 
the checking stations and controls on time, but had the mis- 
fortune of losing three points at one of the checking stations. 
While warning the N. S. U. rider against a bad depression in 
the road, J. G. DeGruchy, on a Thor, had a very pretty fall, but 
escaped injury. Lyon saw another rider, whose number he 
could not get, make a complete somersault with his machine, 
and then continue on his way as though nothing out of the 
ordinary had occurred. 

Ten Miles of Sandy Road. 

Between Coshocton and the next checking station at Newark, 
the distance is 42 miles. On this stretch, between Conesville 
and Fraceyburg, ten miles of sandy road-bed alternates with 
fairly good roads. Between Newark and Hebron, which is 
146 miles away from Cleveland, there is a bad hill, which had 
been washed out by a recent rain. From Newark to Colum- 
bus the distance is 36 miles, making the total from Geveland 
173.7 miles. The first men out were due at Columbus at 
twenty-nine minutes after five in the evening. 

Davies Blames Himself. 

When near Newark Andrew H. Davies, on a Harley- 
Davidson, gave up the attempt to complete the run. Davies 
was quite willing to blame his failure entirely upon himself. 
He said that he had ridden his machine so fast as to have 
caused ignition troubles and overheating, thus putting his 
mount temporarily out of commission. 

Rice, on an R-S, had a fall, with the result that he lost 
ten points on the hill at Connersville and forty points at 
Indianapolis. .Whitney, and his riding mate, Mueller, both on 
Indians, were the first to reach Columbus, where they found 
a crowd of two thousand cheering enthusiasts awaiting their 
arrival. Altogether, seventy riders reached the night control, 
at Columbus, on time. 

The boys made no attempt to "burn up the town" upon their 
reaching Columbus. In anticipation of another day's ex- 
perience like the first one, most of them simply cleaned up 
and immediately retired. A few loitered about the Southern 
Hotel for an hour or two after dinner, but very few indeed 
were to be found outside their rooms after nine o'clock. 



THE SECOND DAY. 

McCarver, Lyon, and De Salvo were the first to be started 
off in front of the Southern. These three men began the 
second day's journey just at seven o'clock, and, as at Geve- 
land, the others were started in groups of four every minute, 
until all who had reached Columbus had been sent on their 
way. The second day's trip, undertaken by eighty-eight men, 
was not at all as trying as had been that of the day previous. 
From Columbus to Dayton, the first checking station, the road- 
bed is of macadam and quite smooth. Large stones, how- 
ever, are distributed about quite liberally, despite which fact 
almost everyone let out his machine over this course, the 
distance between Columbus and Dayton being sixty-eight 
miles. Except at Vienna and Harmony, where there are a few 
low hills, the grade is almost level. In fact, road conditions 
were quite satisfactory except for the amount of dust which 
the fast-traveling machines threw into the air. The roads 
from Dayton to Richmond, one hundred and six miles from 
Columbus, and the noon control, are equally good. In fact, 



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i.— Spectators at one of 
the checking stations 
along the route of the En- 
durance Run. 



♦ * 



a.— F. E. Wilkinson, 
B. A. Swenson, P. B. 
Whitney and L. J. Muel- 
ler (Indians), all perfect 
scorers. 



♦ ♦ 



3« — The scene of the 
hill-climb at Connersville, 
where two thousand peo- 
ple gathered. 



♦ ♦ 



4. — Doctoring a machine, 
also the "innards" of rider 
and members of the tire 
repair corps. 



♦ ♦ 



5.— McCarver and De 
Salvo (Excelsiors), perfect 
scorers and the first to ar- 
rive at Indianapolis. 



♦ ♦ 



6.— The Harley-David- 
son perfect scorers — S. 
Lacy Crolius, Frank Oiler- 
man, Walter Davidson and 
R E. Underbill. 




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7.— Charles Spencer (In- 
dian), perfect score. A. J. 
McCullom (Racycle) and 
J. A. Schuster (Merkel). 



♦ ♦ 



8.— Wendell White (Mer- 
kel), perfect score, and 
Wm. Tuebner (Merkel). 



♦ ♦ 



9. — Emblem team, among 
them George A. Heil, per- 
fect scorer. 



♦ ♦ 



10.— Albert H. Peters 
(Torpedo) perfect score. 
H. J. Kiefler (Kiefler). 



♦ ♦ 



11.— J. C. Crandall(R-S), 
perfect score; A. E. Grif- 
fith (R-S); W. Bewley 
(R-S), perfect score; R. C. 
Sporleder (Indian). 



♦ ♦ 



la.— Part of Merkel 
team, three of whom W. R. 
Kellam, Charles A. Kent 
and J. A. Turner, made 
perfect scores. 



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8 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



while there are a few hills between Liberty and Indianapolis 
the entire second day's route, 188.3 miles in all, is uniformly 
fair. 

The Hill Climb. 

At Connersville, the hill-climb took place. This hill is about 
one-fifth of a mile long with a sharp turn at the bottom and 
a slight turn in the middle, the grade being about ten per 
cent, and the road-bed fairly good. Under ordinary condi- 
tions, ninety per cent, of the riders would probably have 
ascended without dismounting, or even pedaling, but that was 
not the case on Wednesday. Many were penalized owing to 
the existence of one or more of the following three circum- 
stances: First, the fact that about two thousand people were 
gathered on the hill, leaving only a narrow lane through 
which the iders could pass; second, the difficulty of securing 
a good start and the fact that the ascent was steady; third, 
of course, the condition of many of the machines and their 
riders because of their having traveled about three hundred 
miles in a day and half previous to their arrival at the bottom 
of the hill. 

Two More Withdraw. 

Among the riders who failed between Columbus and Day- 
ton were George C. Smith (R-S), who took his engine apart 
and finally gave up the attempt when near Dayton. A. R. 
Oberwegner, on a Yale, had a broken shaft and pulley. He 
and Smith rode into Indianapolis by trolley. 

LeRoy Cook (M.M.) missed a perfect score owing to tire 
troubles the second day. He had a number of punctures, and 
the tubes which he substituted persisted in blowing out. He 
was about an hour late at Dayton, and something like two 
hours behind time at Indianapolis. Cook, though of slight 
build, pounded away to the last, giving an exhibition of 
plucky riding in the face of disheartening circumstances. Dr. 
J. P. Thornley began to lose time between Dayton and Rich- 
mond and, although he ultimately reached Indianapolis, it was 
after the two hour time limit had expired. R. L. Davis, 
mounted on an R-S, injured his ankle by a fall and, with 
brake troubles in the bargain, he retired at Richmond. 

Lees's Daring Ride. 

A. W. Lees, on a Harley-Davidson, did some wonderful 
riding on the last leg of the course. When near Liberty, 
owing to the thick dust, Lees ran into another rider and put 
his chain out of commission. That made it necessary for him 
to ride the rest of the distance — seventy-five miles — without 
using either pedals or brake. When near Indianapolis he had 
a blowout, which delayed him some time, and made him a few 
minutes late. Lister, another Harley-Davidson rider, lost a 
few points on the Connersville hill. However, with Underhill, 
Crolius, Alderman, all Harley-Davidson men, and perfect 
scorers, he reached Indianapolis on time, so that, with seven 
entrants, the Harley-Davidson team scored 5,930 points. 

L A. Baker, on the Marvel, completed the first day's 
journey and almost all of that of the second day without 
trouble. It was not until he reached Rushville, not far from 
Indianapolis, that he broke an inlet valve spring. Having re- 
paired this he continued on his way for a short distance, when 
his exhaust valve broke. He completed the trip, being only 
fourteeen minutes late. 

Some More Troubles. 

Harry Graff, on a Reading Standard, rode pluckily until he 
reached a point within an hour's distance of the end of his 
journey. It was here that his exhaust valve caused him 
trouble. Griffith, his riding mate, waited for him and they 
finished together, about two hours late. 

Harry J. Kiefler, who rode the five horse Kiefler single, 
reports that while he had no engine troubles, his six falls 
delayed him so that he lost 64 points at Indianapolis. 

Drude, who rode an N. S. U., made the first day's journey 
and that of the second day without any serious trouble. Dur- 
ing his Wednesday afternoon's trip, however, breakage of the 
Bowden wires in his control mechanism delayed him so that 
he did not reach Indianapolis until 7:29. Schmidt (Indian) 



made a clever repair by substituting for a broken axle a car- 
riage bolt, thus succeeding in finishing with a perfect score. 

Glass and Gale, riding Indians, made all the controls ex- 
cept the last. Geiger did not reach Columbus, while Gansen 
lost three points there, the only penalties he suffered. Van 
Sickle gave up early, while MacDonald held out until the 
second afternoon. Gray lost ninety points at Columbus, Con- 
nersville and Richmond, respectively. Ingram dropped ten at 
the hill-climbing contest, and Reinboldt seventeen at the Tues- 
day night control. Tormey, Oberweger and Squier each lost 
twenty-five points by dismounting on the hill, and Rice ten 
for pedalling, and 40 for being late at Indianapolis. Le Fevre 
having lost twenty-five points at Columbus, did not get beyond 
Richmond. Graff did not start from Columbus, although 
his first day's score had been perfect. Schuster, Walling and 
Sanford Davidson lost points at Connersville, scoring 975, 
982 and 949 respectively. Ball lost only fourteen points, at 
Richmond. Griffith lost ten on the hill and, with Cook, Graff, 
Klebes, Paul, Samuelson, and Reinholz, was disqualified for 
finishing more than two hours late. Chambers lost twenty- 
seven points at Richmond, Moss, ten at the hill-climb, and 
Bailey, twenty-eight at Columbus and twenty at Indianapolis. 
Buxe lost only ten points on the Connersville hill, and Kuhn 
forty-four for being late at Columbus. 

Arrival of Official Machine. 

The official automobile arrived at Indianapolis at' 4.50 
o'clock. It carried G. H. Hamilton, Earle L Ovington, Oscar 
Hedstrom, and C. H. Wallerich, the latter of the Overland 
Automobile Company. 

The Indianapolis crowd began gathering around the Denison 
hotel about three o'clock. The first riders to arrive and re- 
ceive the welcome signal that their long tour was over were 
Joseph De Salvo, of Chicago, and John McCarver, Indiana- 
polis. They checked in at 5.24 o'clock. Harry Sturm and W. 
B. Harding were the official checkers. The riders did not 
sign the checking sheet until after they had visited the most 
welcome and "more most" needed bath tub. All were smiles, 
despite weary legs and aching heads. 

The riders entered Indianapolis by way of Washington 
street. The machines were taken from the exhausted men 
at the checking station by members of the Indiana Club, 
and pushed to the Cadillac automobile garage, half a square 
away, where they were housed under police vigilance. 

A Well Managed Run. 

That the reception along the route was far more en- 
thusiastic than the most Utopian dreamers had anticipated, 
was largely due to the fact that the riders had used caution 
and pulled off a conservative run, as well as making excellent 
time. It was a cause of mutual help on the part of riders 
and travelers along the roads. The route was carefully dotted 
with signboards, and no difficulty was experienced by riders 
losing the way. 

A change was introduced in the rules governing this year's 
run. Instead of a schedule giving a fixed average rate of 
speed for the whole distance, an innovation was used by vary- 
ing the rate of travel according to the locality, so that the 
riders could be entirely respectful of the speed limitations. 
From Cleveland to Coshocton the running schedule and ar- 
rival at checking stations and controls was based on an average 
speed of fifteen miles an hour; from Coshocton to Columbus, 
seventeen miles, and from Columbus to the end of the run, 
nineteeen miles an hour. A five minute allowance, ahead or 
behind, was given for variation of watches. After that, for 
every minute, not in excess of thirty minutes, a penalty of 
one point was imposed; after thirty minutes, and up to two 
hours, the penalty was two points per minute. Those who 
were more than two hours late suffered disqualification. 

Fine Arrangements. 

The arrangements for the run were well nigh perfect. Under 
the able direction of G. H. Hamilton, the preparatory work 
was done in a most systematic manner. In fact, nothing had 
been neglected which could reasonably serve to make the con- 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



test by far the most successful in the history of motorcycling 
in the United States. Mr. Hamilton had selected a score of 
capable assistants, though, without seeking to discredit the 
efforts of any of these, it must be said that the bulk of the 
work fell upon his shoulders. What is more, he proved him- 
self able to bear the burden like a man. 

It was generally conceded that the route was beautifully 
adapted to giving every machine a proper test. It was not 
too severe, although harder by far than would be experienced 
on the average run of four hundred miles or so. While Swen- 
son and Chappie expressed the opinion that the Catskill 
run was a harder proposition from the standpoint of the 
riders, the others were almost unanimous in their conviction 
that it would have been difficult to have found a more trying 
route. 

Very Few Accidents. 

The journey was characterized by very few accidents. 
About one dozen riders went into ditches, but serious damage 
did not result. The official auto kept about half an hour 
ahead of the caravan of cracking, spurting machines. As soon 
as its occupants had warned the country side that the "dare 
devils" were coming, the entire populace turned out. Farmers 
drove wagon loads of sightseers to points along the course 
and stationed themselves beneath shade trees; others placed 
chairs in front of their homes and children waved flags, while 
all along the route the greeting was uniform and profuse. 

Roads Force Dismounting. 

Some parts of the roads were so bad that the riders were 
forced to dismount and "walk" their machines through the 
deep sand. This, of course, caused them to increase their 
speed as soon as a clean stretch was found. Pedestrians and 
travelers along the roads cleared the track and gave them the 
right of way, driving into the ditches in order not to hinder the 
prize-seekers. 

In the lobbies of the Southern Hotel, at Columbus, the 
riders spoke in profane terms of the wretched roads between 
Coshocton and Newark, but were very enthusiastic in de- 
scribing the welcome received along the way. Near Newark a 
benevolent father had taken out his five young hopefuls to see 
the riders as they went by and, these gave them greeting by 
waving American flags. Buggies were drawn up at almost 
every farmhouse, threshers were tied up and cheer after cheer 
sent the contestants on rejoicing. 

Frame Repaired with Wood. 

One of the interesting side-lights of the trip was an ex- 
perience which befell J. A. McLaughlin, of New York City, 
who rode an N. S. U. machine. In a recent race at Brighton 
Beach he had broken the frame of his machine, but in the 
htnry he had not mended it. When well out of Cleveland the 
break threatened to put him out of the race. But he had an 
inspiration and stopped at a wayside blacksmith shop, where 
a wooden frame was built around the damaged parts. He ar- 
rived in Indianapolis a little late, but with the frame still doing 
service. 

P. B. Whitney, one of the perfect scorers, who rode an 
Indian, gave an exhibition which amused his team mate, A. G. 
Chappie, very much. Whitney - left both Cleveland and Colum- 
bus with a grinning Billiken seated on his handle bar. But 
when, almost simultaneously with two punctures, Whitney 
damaged his pedal, he reached the end of his patience with 
his mascot and before making repairs tore the thing from his 
machine and threw it far into the field. 

Tire Men Worked Hard. 
Too much credit cannot be given to the representatives of 



the G. & J., the Morgan and Wright and the Kokoma Tire 
companies. Messrs. Stephens, Mason and Tower, and, before 
the accident to the Kokomo machine, Mr. Spraker, were al- 
ways ready and anxious to help any rider out of his troubles. 
It can be stated without any possibility of contradiction that 
the tire men never put in a harder two days' session. Not only 
did they make tire repairs and substitutions, but they did 
practically everything else that was possible to assist the boys 
in their efforts to make perfect scores. Again, they repaired 
not only their own tires, but, in a most gracious way, were 
always ready to do similar service for riders using the tires 
of a competing manufacturer. The riders were loud in their 
praises of the hearty spirit and the energy which characterized 
the work of the tire men throughout. Fortunately for these 
overworked individuals, tire troubles were not as serious as 
might have been expected, but they made good use of the 
opportunity thus afforded them to aid the riders in other 
ways, with a view to enable them to be as comfortable as pos- 
sible under the circumstances. 

Those entered who did not start were Edward Buffum, 
Charles Balke, H. J. Wehman, Stanley Kellogg, C. P. Rudd. 
Fank D. Shomo and C. P. Rodgers. 

There were four controls, Coshocton, Columbus, Richmond 
and Indianapolis. Penalties were imposed, as above stated, 
for late arrivals at these points. At Connersville, where the 
hill-climb took place, those who pedaled or dismounted were 
penalized. The tabulated result shows the penalties, if any, 
imposed upon every rider at each control, together with his 
final score. 

The Endurance Run Officials. 

Contest Committee: G. H. Hamilton, (Chairman), In- 
dianapolis ; Frederick B. Hart, Chicago. At Cleveland, Ohio — 
Gerk of Course, D. R Foote ; starter, Geo. Collister ; Checker, 
E. M. Bell; Technical Committee, C. J. Forbes, O. C. Forster, 
E. A. Foss. At Wooster, Ohio — Checkers, J. M. Ginter, R. 
Drabenstot. At Coshocton, Ohio — Clerk of Course, S. 
Siegrist; Starter, Joe Johnson; Checker, Joe Thompson; 
Technical Committee, Geo. Siegrist, U. G. Rolston, Fred 
Simmons. At Newark, Ohio— Checkers, Geo. T. Stream, C. E. 
Wyeth. At Columbus, Ohio— Checkers, J. A. Yates, E. M. 
Gorrell; Technical Committee, J. J. Keating, A. C. Edwards, 
Al Shuster; Monitors, Earl Stormont, R. H. Erienbush, Jr., 
J. G. De Gruchy; Starter, Frank H. Lawwell. At Dayton, 
Ohio — Checkers — J. A. Campbell, F. A. Shank. At Richmond, 
Ind. — Clerk of Course, P. S. Brown; Checkers, Wm. 
Creager, Chas. Tangeman; Technical Committee, Wm. Wak- 
ing, Elmer Smith, John Darnell; Starter, Denneth Craig. At 
Liberty, Ind. — Checkers, Albert Bertsch, Dr. Garret Pigman. 
At hill-climb, Connersville, Ind. — Judges, C. F. Roots, J. C. 
Phelan, Bert A. Adams; Checkers, M. Hassett, O. L. Reeson; 
flagman, H. H. Hubbard. At Indianapolis, Ind. — Checkers, W. 
B. Harding, Robt. Sturm; Technical Committee, W. G. 
Wall, Geo. A. Weidley, Howard C. Marmon; Monitors, C. R. 
Scott, Lee Chapman, P. C. Hudson, Fred Fenter, Chester Hill, 
J. C. Rickerts. 

The visiting riders were given a reception at the Indiana 
Club on Wednesday night. Here they were met by the officials 
of that organization, given refreshments, and a handsome 
souvenir badge. About four hundred availed themselves of 
the opportunity to register at the headquarters of the club, 
on Vermont street. 

The tire hospital brigade did wonderful work. They helped 
the fallen, no matter what tire had come to grief. Narrow 
men would have aided users of their tires only. But these were 
broad men. Their chief aim was to give motorcycling gener- 
ally a boost. 



THE Manufacturers Association, which met at Chicago the 
6th instant, elected the following officers: George M. 
Hendee, Hendee Manufacturing Company, Springfield, Mass., 
president; C. Hurley, Aurora Automatic Machinery Company, 



Chicago, 111., vice-president ; W. F. Remppis, Reading Standard 
Company. Reading. Pa., secretary; Percy Pierce, Pierce Cycle 
Company, Buffalo, treasurer. The session was secret, and no 
other announcements were made. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



NATIONAL ENDURANCE RUN SCORES 



Rider. 



Machine. H.P. 



No. 

i. J. McCarver Excelsior 3 J / 2 

2. A. G. Lyon Excelsior 3# 

3. Jos. De Salvo Excelsior 3 l / 2 

4. Harold J. Levis Excelsior 3*6 

5. F. E. Wilkinson Indian 5 

6. B. A. Swenson Indian 5 

7. P. B. Whitney Indian 5 

8. L. J. Mueller Indian 5 

9. R. W. Du Sell Thor 6 

10. Harold Alderman Thor 6 

11. Harry H. Reinholz Thor 6 

12. J. G. De Gruchy Thor 3 l / 2 

13. W. White Merkel 6 

15. Wm. Teubner Merkel 3V2 

17. Chas. A. Kent Merkel 6 

18. Chas. D. Foht Merkel 6 

19. J. A. Turner Merkel 6 

20. W. R. Kellam Merkel 6 

21. A D. Cook Curtiss 7 

23. A. H. Peters Torpedo 6 

24. Henry J. Kiefler Kiefler 5 

25. George A. Heil Emblem 4 

26. H. R. Lock Emblem 4 

27. J. C. Glass Emblem 4 

28. M. E. Gale Emblem 4 

29. R. E. Underhill H.-D 4 

30. S. LCrolius H.-D 4 

31. Frank Ollerman H.-D 4 

32. Walter Davidson H.-D 4 

33. E. M. Hughes Indian 5 

34. A. G. Schmidt Indian 5 

35. Lyle Geiger Indian 5 

36. H. H. Gansen Indian 5 

37. W. J. Lister H.-D 4 

38. A. H. Davies H.-D 4 

39. Arthur Lees H.-D 4 

40. C. W. Van Sickle Indian 5 

41. C. W. McDonald Indian 3 l / 2 

42. B.. C. Ogden I idian 5 

43. Arthur B. Porter I ndian 5 

44. A. G. Chappie Indian 5 

45. Robert S. Gray N. S. U 3 

46. C. H. Drude N. S. U 4 

47. L. Wipperman Excelsior ... .3^2 

49. A. B. Oberwegner Vale 3 l / 2 

50. W.W.Ingram Yale 3*/* 

51. Geo. W. Reinbold Yale 3 l / 2 

52. S. J. Chubbuck Yale 3 l / 2 

53- J- C. Turpin New Era 3 l / 2 

54. E. L. Le Fevre New Era 3V 2 

55. E. L. Morse New Era 3 l / 2 

57. J. S. Tormey Thor 4 

59. O. J. Oberwegner Thor 3% 

60. G. H. Squier Thor 3 l / 2 

61. G. C. Smith R.-S 3V2 

62. R. L. Davis R.-S 4 

63. H. J. Klebes R.-S 3V2 

64. J. G. Rice R.-S 4 

65. G. W. Lyon Indian 3V2 

66. C. S. Hinckley Indian 3V2 

67. Wm. Grepp Indian 5 

68. E. G. Baker Indian 5 

69. F. U. Paul Pierce 6 





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Remarks. Score. 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Out at Coshocton 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Out after Richmond 

Over 2 hrs. late at Indianapolis 

1,000 

1,000 

Pedalled on hill 990 

1,000 

Dismounted on hill 943 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

936 

1,000 

Out before Richmond 

986 

856 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Out after Coshocton 

997 

Dismounted on hill 975 

Out after Coshocton 

Dismounted on hill 958 

Did not reach Coshocton 

984 

1,000 

Didn't start 2nd day.: 

1,000 

Pedalled on hill 910 

682 

1,000 

Out at Richmond 

Pedalled on hill 990 

983 

1,000 

1,000 

Out before Richmond 

975 

Dismounted on hill 975 

« " " 975 

« " !'.!!!!.!.. 975 

Out at Richmond 

Out after Richmond 

Over 2 hrs. late, Indianapolis 

950 

1,000 

1,000 

Out after Columbus 

Didn't reach Coshocton 

Over 2 hrs. late, Indianapolis 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



11 



No. 
70. 
71- 
72. 
73- 
74- 
75 
76. 
77- 
78. 
79- 
8o. 
8i. 
8>. 
83. 
84. 
8> 
86. 

87. 
88. 
89. 
90. 
9i. 
9-2. 
93- 
94- 
96. 

97- 
98. 
99- 

100. 

101. 

102. 

103. 



Rider. 



Machine. H.P. 



K. Y. Taylor Pierce 6 

F. L. Hunt Pierce 6 

A. H. Crocker Thor 6 

W. Staudt R.-S 3V2 

E. L. Hess R.-S 3^ 

E. Samuelson R.-S 3! 2 

Harrv Graff R.-S 3^ 

Don Klark N. S. U 6 

Gus W'adsworth X. S. U 6 

H. B. Lvons N. S. U 4 

J. F. McLaughlin X. S. U 6 

A. J. McCallum Racycle 4 

J. A. Schuster >Merkel 3V2 

C Spencer Indian 5 

H. J. D'Errice Indian 5 

C. K. Ball Reliance 3V2 

G. W. Sayre Reliance 7 

Frank Walling Reliance y/ 2 

Sanford Davidson Reliance 3*4 



..3 T /2 



...3/2 

•3V2 



A. E. Griffith R.-S. 

G. C. Crandall R.-S. 

R. C. Sporleder Indian 5 

W. Bewlev R.-S 3V2 

B. V. Chambers R.-S. 

V. H. Moss R.-S. 

C. R. Bailey Reliance 3V2 

Le Roy Cook M. M ...3I/2 

\V. Brewster M. M 6 

G. M. Green M. M y/ 2 

Le Roy Baker Marvel 3^ 

J. P. Thornley Indian 5 

R. J. Buxe R.-S 3V2 

P. J. Kuhns R.-S 3V2 



C3 

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10 
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£ Remarks. Score. 

Out after Coshocton 

o 1,000 

o 1,000 

o * 1.000 

Out after Coshocton 

Over 2 hrs. late at Indianapolis 

o ..' 1,000 

Didn't reach 1st control 

o 997 

o 979 

Out after Coshocton 

o Dismounted on hill 975 

o 1.000 

Didn't reach Coshocton 

o 986 

Out at Columbus 

8 Pedalled on hill 982 

25 " " " 949 

« u a 

o 1,000 

o 1,000 

o 1,000 

o 973 

o 990 

20 952 

Over 2 hrs. late at Indianapolis 

Out after Coshocton 

o 1,000 

14 986 

Out at Richmond 

o Pedalled on hill 990 

o 956 



SPEEDWAY RACES A FAILURE 



Track Not Ready— Only Part of the Two Days' 

THE widely, not to say wildly, heralded records which 
were to have been made on the Indianapolis speed- 
way, in the two-days' race events which were to have 
been part of the programme of the F. A. M. meet, failed 
most dismally to materialize. The huge track, the im- 
mensity of which one must prove by personal visit in 
order to appreciate, was not in condition for motorcycle 
racing. Apparently the enormous stretches of crushed 
stone which constitute the roadbed of the track were 
quite as smooth as a billiard table, but the first try-outs 
by the riders proved just the contrary to be the case. 
The speedway may be made of the stuff of which records 
are born, but such , a condition of affairs is yet to be 
developed. The passage of a winter and then the tilling in 
of the portions which have settled — leaving dangerous hol- 
low spots and a generally rough surface — may serve to 
make the Indianapolis track the fastest in the world. But 
to thus define it now would be a gross perversion of the 
facts. Simply stated, the tremendous task undertaken by 
the owners and promoters of the project has not been 
finished. That they tried hard cannot be questioned, nor 
is it their fault that a programme which promised the 
most interesting racing session in the history of the 
F. A. M. was practically ruined. 

It was early in the week that reports began to be circu- 
lated that the races would be a failure, for the reasons 
already set forth. Still, those in charge and the rest of 
the boys, except the riders themselves, continued to hope 
against hope in the face of the most discouraging predic- 
tions. Then, on account of rain Friday morning, the 



Programme Was Attempted— Dc Rosier Hurt. 

races were postponed until the following day, and when 
the starters in the first event were called to the line by 
Referee Earle L. Ovington, about five thousand specta- 
tors occupied the huge grandstand and bleachers, await- 
ing, some without knowing it, that which was inevitable. 

Nor was it long after that the fears of those who knew the 
conditions were realized. This was in the ten mile pro- 
fessional, in which Jake De Rosier, on an Indian, and 
Eddie Lingenf elder, on a Thor, were the only starters. 
It is doubtful whether any two other men in the game are 
more evenly matched. From the very outset, the contest 
promised to be one of magnificent proportions. The In- 
dian man got away first, increasing his lead for a distance 
of about three-quarters of a mile. By this time Lingen- 
felder got his machine thoroughly under way, and, gain- 
ing steadily, he passed De Rosier when half way around 
on the first lap, that is, after the two men had ridden 
about a mile and a quarter. The turn to the left of the 
grandstand is hidden behind a clump of trees, so that for 
a half mile or so this portion of the track cannot be seen 
from the grandstand. However, the N. S. U. man re^ 
mained in the lead, and, as they turned into the straight- 
away leading to the starting line, it was seen that Lingen- 
felder was something like 75 feet ahead. Thus the two 
flashed by the grandstand, both riding beautifully, but 
with De Rosier at a disadvantage because of his inability, 
on account of his lightness and that of his machine, to 
hold his mount down to the track as Lingenfelder was 
doing. 

Going into the second lap, the Springfield man in- 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 




creased his speed and, at the point where Lingenfelder 
had passed him the first time around, the Indian rider 
regained the lead. But he did not hold it long, Lingen- 
felder passing him a third of a mile further on. Again 
the riders were lost behind the trees and, for nearly a half 
minute they fought for supremacy in the solitude of the 
distant turn. Then down into the stretch they came the 
second time, Lingenfelder still in the lead. Half a mile 
from the stand De Rosier's machine hit a depression in 
the track. His front wheel was twisted and his tire ripped 
off. The champion fell in a cloud of dust. He had been 
going at the rate of 6o miles an hour, and the anxious 
crowd, including hundreds of his personal friends, feared 
the worst. But when, a few seconds later, he was seen to 
rise and walk slowly to the edge of the track, it seemed 
as though he had not been seriously hurt. 

Lingenfelder went on, and an auto, containing Referee 
Ovington, Dr. Thornley and a local physician, was sent 
out. A hasty examination disclosed not only scratches 
and bruises, but also a painful and serious organic wound, 
necessitating an operation, and certain to incapacitate him 
for the balance of the season,. While De Rosier's com- 
plete recovery is predicted, it is quite probable that he 
will never again ride in his old-time form. 

Lingenfelder finished alone, making the distance under 
a slow-down in 10:51^, excellent time in view of the con- 
dition of the track. But the accident served to effectually 
squash what enthusiasm there was left in the entrants. 
The mishap two days before to Officer Albert C. Gibney, 
of the Indianapolis police force, while trying out his R-S, 
had cooled the ardor of many, and De Rosier's misfor- 
tune simply redoubled their fears. Gibney was quite seri- 
ously hurt; it is not at all unlikely that his injuries may 
prove fatal. As a result, only twelve started in the next 
event, which over thirty had entered. There were almost 
as many entries in the ten mile national amateur cham- 
pionship, yet only four started, while for the last event, 
the twenty-five mile race, none of the twenty starters ap- 



peared. That ended the "sport" for the afternoon. 

Previous to De Rosier's accident, four events had been 
run. The first was the five mile handicap for private 
owners. There were eight starters. Bahnsen, on an In- 
dian, with 1.24 minutes start, soon secured the lead, which 
he maintained until some distance into the second lap, 
Nelson J. Hodgin (Indian) following him closely. But 
A. G. Chappie, with 41 seconds handicap, was gaining 
upon the two leaders and soon overtook them both. The 
New Yorker won easily in 4.53^- Hodgin was second and 
Bahnsen third. 

The most interesting event of the afternoon was the 
one mile F. A. M. national amateur championship. There 
were more than a dozen competitors, and when these men, 
after having been started behind the trees, came out of 
the turn into the homestretch, the sight was a pretty one 
indeed. The lead was held by Stanley Kellogg, on a Mer- 
kel, who was closely followed by Fred Huyck, on an In- 
dian. Kellogg remained ahead until within a hundred feet 
of the finish, when, unwilling to take any further 
chances, he cut off his power slightly. Huyck, on the con- 
trary, maintained the nerve-racking, dangerous pace, 
passing Kellogg within a few feet of the finish, and win- 
ning in 1.05H, by only a half wheel. Kellogg hugged his 
machine so closely that, in contact with his engine, he 
burned through his shoe, and after the race showed a 
well-swollen toe. Seymour, on a Reading- Standard, captured 
third prize. 

The third event, a five mile handicap, limited to mem- 
bers of the Indiana Club, had eleven starters. The first 
time around John McCarver (Excelsior) led, with Paul 
Kottlowski (Minneapolis 2-speed) second, and Nelson J. 
Hodgin (Indian) third. McCarver lost his advantage on 
the second lap, giving way to Kottlowski and Hodgin, the 
former winning by a fair margin, and Hodgin taking sec- 
ond place. 

The five mile race for machines not exceeding 55 cubic 
inches piston displacement brought out six starters, and 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



13 



proved an interesting tussle between Huyck, Chappie and 
Goerke, all Indian riders. They soon had left plenty of space 
between themselves and the other three, and then, riding 
at a comfortable pace, "jockeyed" with one another for 
position. Huyck took the lead at the start, Chappie 
passing him at iV 4 miles. Coming down the stretch 
they were on even terms. This was true of the second as 
well as the first lap, Goerke being close behind the lead- 
ers, with the others well stretched out. When a hundred 
yards from the finish, Huyck opened his throttle a little 
wider, passing the New Yorker and winning comfortably. 
The time was 5.24^. 

The next race, the ten mile professional, resulted in 
De Rosier's accident. The sixth event, a five mile handicap 
for machines not exceeding 61 cubic inches piston dis- 
placement, was won by Huyck with comparative ease. 
Huyck was scratch man. Balke, on a Merkel, also 
scratch, was second, and Turner, also on a Merkel, took 
third place. 

At this juncture a Stoddard-Dayton car was sent 
around the track in 3.07. Later, a Knox car covered the 
2^4 miles in 2.20. 

The ten mile national championship, with over thirty 
entered, attracted only four starters — Erwin G. Baker 
(Indian), and H. R. Britney, John Merz and J. S. Tor- 
mey, all Thor riders. Tormey led at the end of the first 
lap, with Baker, on an Indian, second. The latter took 
the lead when one of the tires of Tormey's machine came 
off. Fortunately for him, he did not fall, although the 
crowd was kept in suspense until he and his mount were 
brought back in an auto. Baker gained steadily, winning 
in 11.31H, by a big margin. Britney was second, and 
Merz third. 

The Summaries: 

Five Mile Handicap for Private Owners. — First, A. G. 
Chappie, New York (Indian 5 h.), 41 sec; second, Nelson 
J. Hodgin, Indianapolis (Indian 5 h.), 1.23; third, Tim 
Bahnsen, St. Louis (Indian 5 h.), 1.24. Time, 4.53^. 



One Mile, F. A. M. Amateur National Championship. — 
First, Huyck, Chicago (Indian 7 h.); second, Kellogg, New 
York (Merkel 7 h.); third, Raymond Seymour, Los An- 
geles (R-S 7 h.). Time, 1.05^. 

Five Mile Handicap for Members of the Indiana Club. — 
First, Paul Kottlowski (Minneapolis 2 speed 5 h.); second, 
N. J. Hodgin (Indian 5 h.); third, John McCarver (Ex- 
celsior y/ 2 h.). Time, 5.17. 

Five Mile Race for machines not exceeding 55 cubic 
inches piston displacement, and having no exhaust ports. — 
First, Huyck, Chicago (Indian 5 h.); second, Chappie, 
New York (Indian 5 h.) ; third, Goerke, New York (In- 
dian 5 h.). Time, 5.24^. 

Five Mile Handicap, limited to machines not exceeding 
61 cubic inches piston displacement. — First, Huyck, Chi- 
cago (Indian 7 h.); second, Balke, Los Angeles (Merkel 
7 h.); third, J. A. Turner, Chicago (Merkel 7 h.). Time, 
446^. 

Ten Mile F. A. M. National Amateur Championship. — 
First, Erwin G. Baker (Indian 7 h.) ; second, H. R. Britney. 

Ten Mile Professional. — Won by Eddie Lingenfelder, Al- 
hambra, Cal. (N. S. U. 7 h.). De Rosier fell near the end 
of the second lap. Time, 10.51^. 

Just before the opening of the race meet, a majority of the 
entrants held a meeting and decided not to ride Monday, owing 
to the dangerous condition of the track. Moreover, many of 
the boys who had the hardihood to ride in the first three or 
four events, determined after De Rosier's accident to quit 
altogether, which explains the low number of starters in the 
10 mile national championship event, and the entire absence of 
starters from the 25 mile race. The two mile championship 
has already been awarded to Springfield, where, or on the 
Detroit track, the other championship races will be conducted, 
probably in September. 

THE Toledo police department have uniformed their 
motorcycle officers in khaki, and the result is a 
very neat appearance. 




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14 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



RULES CONTROVERSY ENDS IN COMPROMISE 

Three Classes — Private Owner, Trade Rider and Professional. 



AFTER three of the most strenuous and by far the most 
interesting sessions which have ever characterized a con- 
vention of the Federation of American Motorcyclists, the 
principal bone of contention — the competition rules — has been 
picked dry, and, where disaffection and discord had threatened 
to rend apart the fabric of the organization, there is har- 
mony, not entire agreement, by any means, but at least a con- 
sensus of opinion that the difficulties involved in the bitter 
controversy have been met and overcome quite as well as 
could have been expected under the circumstances. Simply 
stated, each one of the rules factions has given way to the 
other, with the result that a compromise has been effected, 
and a three-part classification adopted. It required practically 
an entire day to bring this about and, for one year, in any 
event, the F. A. M. will recognize private owners, trade 
riders and professionals. Under the new classification, a 
private owner is an amateur who from the date, thirty days 
hence, when the revised rules become effective, has not en- 
gaged in a motorcycling competition as a trade rider; who 
actually owns the motorcycle used in competition ; who is not 
connected in any way, either directly or indirectly, with any 
person or firm that manufactures, assembles, sells or repairs 
motorcycles or motorvehicles ; who does not operate them 
as a trade or profession ; who has never received, either 
■directly or indirectly, any compensation whatsoever for en- 
gaging in a motorcycle competition or exhibition ; who has 
never sold or in any way realized pecuniary benefit from a 
prize, and who has never knowingly competed with a pro- 
fessional. 

The new rules establish the amateur status of the trade 
rider, making him subject to all the provisions of the private 
owner classification, except, of course, that he is permitted to 
be in the trade, and need not own his machine. He cannot 
accept cash for competing. 

The professional is one who, as under the present classifica- 
tin, accepts cash, or who for any other reason is ineligible 
as a private owner or trade rider. 

This classification was determined upon after an extended 
debate, in which active parts were taken by President Oving- 
ton, Chairman Thornley, of the competition committee ; W. F. 
Remppis, of the rules revision committee; Frederic B. Hart, 
George W. Sherman, G. H. Hamilton, R. G. Betts, editor of 
the Bicycling World; J. Leo Sauer, editor of Motorcycle 
Illustrated; Dr. Charles J. Berrick, of Buffalo; Mr. Grif- 
fith, of the Chicago Athletic Club; Jack Prince and a number 
of others. Interest was at fever heat all the time, and the 
convention proved, by its applause and otherwise, its intense 
concern over the outcome of the controversy. 

When the classification article of the proposed new competi- 
tion rules was reached, the fun began. Previous to that, Mr. 
Remppis, in presenting the report of the rules revision com- 
mittee, emphasized the fact that the members of the com- 
mittee had been unfairly criticised, their motives questioned, 
and even their honesty reflected upon. Mr. Remppis became 
very vigorous in his denunciation of these tactics. He charged 
that untrue and misleading statements had been circulated, 
and he wanted to make it plain that the committee had not 
only worked hard, but had tried, as well, to evolve a set of 
rules which would insure fairness to all. Mr. Betts declared 
that no aspersion of the motives of the members of the com- 
mittee had been intended by him, and that if he had made 
any untruthful or even misleading statements, he had not 
clone so by design. Mr. Remppis expressed his satisfac- 
tion with this and, thereafter, personalities were dropped 
in order to give the merits of the question the attention they 
deserved. 

The majority report of the committee having been read, Mr. 



Betts, on behalf of the minority, including Messrs. Davidson, 
Douglass, Sherman and himself, presented a minority report, 
insisting that the amendments did not materially change the 
proposed rules, except that they provided that no kind of 
amateur — trade rider or private owner — could ride for cash, 
and that connection with the trade should not disqualify a 
man from competing, in any athletic event, as an amateur. 
Mr. Betts, for the minority members of the committee, ac- 
cordingly moved that the proposed rules be amended to pro- 
vide, among other things, that there be two classes, amateurs 
and professionals ; that every programme having three or more 
motorcycle events include one for private owners or for 
novices; that a private owner be defined as one who has not 
been connected with the trade for at least six months, and 
whose machine has been his sole property for at least ninety 
days; that no amateur be permitted to compete outside of a 
radius of ioo miles of his home, school or college, except with 
permission of the chairman of the competition committee, 
not more than three times a year, nor for more than two 
weeks each time, these periods to be non-consecutive. It was 
this limitation clause over which the hardest fighting was 
subsequently done. 

The projection of these amendments caused the batteries 
of the opposing forces to be opened, and the cannonade of 
arguments went on merrily for hours, Friday and Saturday 
morning. The minority amendments provided also that in 
the event of infraction of these rules in important particulars, 
not only the guilty manufacturer, but also all his employes 
and all his machines be debarred from competition for one 

year. 

Many Pros and Cons. 

It was urged that the classification proposed by the special 
committee would cause a fracture of the F. A. ML's relations 
with the A. A. U. Some voiced the opinion that the Federa- 
tion was big enough to invite the A. A. U. to mind its own 
business. Messrs. Griffith and Sauer warned against such an 
attempt, predicting its failure. Mr. Sherman denounced the 
proposed rules on the score of their practically professional- 
izing every man in the trade. Mr. Hart said that while he 
approved of some of the suggestions contained in the minority 
report, he was inclined to believe that there should be three 
classes, with the professionals, and not the amateurs, redivided 
into trade riders and the out-and-out cash seekers. 

At It All Day Friday. 

These arguments were hurled back and forth all the morning 
and, after lunch, all the afternoon, the Speedway races having 
been postponed on account of rain. It was apparent, how- 
ever, that the committee's report would have been adopted at 
certain psychological moments; in fact, it would have been 
comparatively easy to railroad through the classification. The 
chairman, however, maintained his patience with the debaters, 
although his enthusiasm caused him, now and then, to over- 
ride his privileges. But inasmuch as Mr. Ovington was at 
his best, full of ideas and overflowing with energy, he may 
be excused. 

In the Interests of Peace. 

Messrs. Hart, Hamilton and Griffith proved very helpful 
to the convention in applying cold logic to the heated argu- 
ments of some of the others, on both sides. As the evening 
approached the convention grew restless, and the danger of 
action on the spur of the moment increased every minute. 
Then it was that one of the speakers explained that the three 
points of difference had simmered down to the following: 
First, the attitude of the F. A. M. towards the A. A. U. ; sec- 
ond, what disposition to make of the small agent, director 
and the like, who is the owner of his machine; third, what to 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



15 



do with the factory rider who is evidently paid for his serv- 
ices. The speaker urged peace above all things else, and ex- 
pressed the hope of a solution what would be amicable to 
everybody concerned. 

It was then that Mr. Ovington, with a giantesque voice, first 
proposed three classes, and the convention simply howled its 
approval. It was then decided to appoint a committee of five 
to redraft the rules on the principle that both private owner 
and trade rider be amateurs, and that a professional class be 
added. This committee was composed of Messrs. Ovington, 
Thornley, Betts, Sauer and Berrick. Thus it was that the 
controversy was removed from the floor of the convention 
to the committee room, and wrestled with for three hours. 
It did not take long to reach an agreement upon everything 
except one point, namely, whether to limit the trade rider to 
competing within one or two hundred miles of his legal resi- 
dence, and thus do away with the factory rider, or make him 
a professional. Two of the members of the committee were 
sure that this was a proper provision; two were positive that 
it was entirely wrong, while the fifth did not hesitate to ex- 
press himself as in doubt, insisting that this one point be laid 
before the convention. The doubtful member admitted that 
the theoretical correctness of this provision was almost self- 
evident, on the ground that the trade rider class was about 
to be made strictly amateur. On the other hand, he urged that 
while the rules should by no means be made to suit the manu- 
facturers, it was only reasonable, where there was any doubt, 
to be fair to them and also fair to the public, which is entitled 
to good sport, and which it must have if the F. A. M. is to 
continue. But, most unfortunate of all, those who favored 
the limitation were urged to prove the likelihood of the 
F. A. M. succeeding where the chairman of the competition 
committee of the A. A. U. admitted himself to be helpless, 
acknowledging that the professionalization of some ten or 
twelve prominent athletes, who were known to be amateurs in 
name only, would in all probability rend asunder the power- 
ful A. A. U. 

These two sides of the proposition were plainly stated to the 
convention, which, after an hour's discussion Saturday morn- 
ing, decided to let alone that which it considered well enough, 
and not to attempt to limit the territory in which a trade rider 
may compete. Thereupon the much-mooted article, entitled 
"Classification of Competitors/' was adopted in its entirety, 
and the problem disposed of, at least for a year. 

Other Provisions. 

The rules also provide that a trade rider who has severed all 
connection with the motorcycle and motor vehicle trade, and 
who has not been directly or indirectly connected with the 
trade for six months, may be recognized as a private owner. 

On the other hand, a private owner who enters and uses any 
machine other than his own, will be subject to suspension for 
at least one year. 

In order to enable American riders to compete abroad, the 
rules provide that they may do so under the rules of that 
country, provided those rules do not conflict with the F. A. M. 
classification. In this connection, reference may be made to 
the fact that the convention failed by two votes only to re- 
instate as an amateur T. K. Hastings, who was some time 
ago professionalized for riding with men who, in their turn, 
had ridden with professionals in England. Reinstatement re- 
quires a unanimous vote, but there were two objectors. 



A Genuine Compromise. 

Although this paper some time ago proposed three classes 
as a possible way out of the difficulty, Motorcycle Illus- 
trated claims no victory for its particular cause. In fact, 
the new classification is a real compromise. The different 
factions have met on common ground with a view to subserv- 
ing the best interests 01 the F. A. M. 

In addition to amending the classification of competitors, 
the F. A. M. made important changes in many other pro- 
visions of both the old rules and those proposed by the 
committee, which was discharged with thanks. The new rules 
go into effect within thirty days, their important provisions 
being substantially the following: 

The chairman of the competition committee may give or 
refuse racing sanctions as he sees fit. Programme details 
are improved, and it is provided that women may not compete 
except in reliability trials. The penalty for omissions from en- 
try blanks, or misleading information thereon, is suspension 
for one year ; for fraudulent entry, indefinite suspension. 

It is the referee's privilege and duty to allow the use of 
only safe tracks, and of machines adapted to them. The 61 
cubic inches limit as to piston displacement is retained. 

After a protracted debate, the convention voted that only 
professionals be permitted to change machines in any one 
event. Someone intimated that this would be rather hard on 
the factory trade rider in long distance contests. A competitor 
may pedal, except at the finish of a race. The leading rider 
has the pole; he may be disqualified if he turns his head to 
look back, while the man who passes the leader must not 
attempt to take the pole unless at least a length intervenes. 

Seals will no longer be required in reliability tests, though 
compliance with the speed laws of the community will be 
necessary. 

The Stock Machine. 

Messrs. Ovington, Remppis, Sherman, Hart and Betts. after 
wrestling with the problem for about an hour, agreed that 
a stock machine was one whose bore or stroke had not been 
enlarged, which had not been fitted with auxiliary ports or 
had its compression altered; or subject to any other altera- 
tion, as to engine or frame, so as to cause it to differ from 
stock models regularly sold in the open market. Except for 
hill-climbs, stock models must be fitted with mufflers. 

Standing and flying start records will be recognized for 
the kilometer and the mile, and thereafter only flying start 
records. Records will continue to be distinguished as those 
made in competition and against time. Record claims must 
be filed with the chairman of the competition committee not 
later than fifteen days after they have been made. There wil! 
be five national championships, viz., one mile, two miles, five 
miles, ten miles, and one hour. Hereafter, promoters of races 
will be expected to prove payment for prizes before entry 
blanks are distributed. 

The corrupt practices clause has been strengthened, the 
provisions affecting protests and appeals are the same as un- 
der the old rules. The hill climbing low weight limit has 
been increased from 125 to 135 pounds. Finally all com- 
petitors in events sanctioned by the Federation must be 
F. A. M. members. 

The new rules will be printed in the near future. At Mr. 
Ovington's suggestion, there will be added, as in the A. A. A. 
rule book, a two-page appendix of power and mileage tables. 



CLEVELAND, August 8. — A crowd of two thousand people 
witnessed the motorcycle and bicycle races held yes- 
terday afternoon at the Valley Track, under the auspices 
of the Cleveland Motorcycle Club. The motorcycle events 
resulted as follows: One Mile Singles — Won by Ray Skeel ; 
2, Herman Hill; 3, Strople. Time, 1.50. Five Mile Dou- 
bles — Won by Strople; 2. Skeel; 3, Stewart. Time, 7.09^. 
Pursuit Race — Spencer rode eight and one-quarter miles in 
11 min. 29^ seconds, passing the fourth and last of his 
competitors. One Mile Trials — Spencer rode one mile in 
1.20^; Skeel, 1.21; Strople, 1.22H and Kervco, 1.31. 



AFTER finding that the duties demanded by the Canadian 
government were more than they thought poper. Archi- 
bald E. Morse and Marvin T. Booth, both of Worcester, have 
crossed over the Canadian border, but not on the machines on 
which they left Worcester, more than a month ago. The 
young men were held up at St. Albans, Vt.. for a month, 
awaiting some decision by the government at Ottawa regard- 
ing the tariff. 

It is said that the motorcycles used by Morse and Booth 
were the first to show up for crossing into Canada. That is 
what caused the delay at St. Albans, it is declared. 



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THE TRIP TO KOKOMO 



ONE of the most enjoyable features of the many supplied 
by the entertainers to the visitors to Indianapolis for 
the meet of the F. A. M. was the run by special traction car 
to Kokomo. It had been arranged to have the trip made on 
the machines, but owing to the condition of the roads Mr. 
Sprakcr, of the Kokomo Rubber Company, changed the plans 
and provided one of the large special cars for conveyance. 
A party sufficiently large to comfortably fill the car went 
along. Cigars ad lib. were passed around and. after a delight- 
ful ride through the beautiful country made famous by J. 
Whitoomb Riley, the party arrived at Kokomo. 

Chief Kokomo, from whom the city of Kokomo was named, 
was born about the year 1775. He was chief of the Miami 
Indian tribe, whose village was located south of Wildcat River, 
where is now located South Kokomo. 

Chief Kokomo was a strong and silent man. He traced the 
little paths made bare by the moccasin and the ponies' tread 
through dark woods along the banks of the little streams that 
wend their way to the greater streams. Since that day the 
white man has built miles of beautiful roads over which the 
gridiron tread of the Kokomo tire rolls swiftly along. 

Chief Kokomo died in loneliness about the year 1838, and 
was buried according to the customs of his people, though 
directed by the white man. His remains now lie buried in the 
old cemetery at Kokomo. 

Kokomo, the city, lay dead like the chief after whom it was 
named until the establishment there of the Kokomo Rubber 
Company, which manufactures the tire that has made Kokomo 
famous. After a ride to South Park the guests were taken to 
the Kokomo Country Club, where Mr. Spraker welcomed the 
KiiesK Here, on the wide veranda, tables were spread for a 
dinner which was a credit to the chef and served with excellent 
taste. The menu consisted of broiled chicken, salad, potatoes, 
jelly, peas, ice cream, cake and Milwaukee spring water labeled 
with a blue ribbon. After music, etc., three times three and a 
tiger were given for Kokomo, and a happy little speech from 
Mr. Spraker the younger followed. Then a visit was made to 
the factory and the methods of making tires fully explained to 
the visitors, 

Sixty-eight made the trip to Kokomo as follows: Marion 
Collamore, Toledo, O. ; Lucy Edgell, Dallas, Tex. ; Helen P. 
K raus, Peru, Indiana; A. R. Coffman, Toledo, O. ; Milton 
Kraus. Peru. lnd. ; Win. F. McCoy. Indianapolis; Chas. G. 
Perciv.il. Motor Car of New York; Ren F.. Neal. Buffalo, N. 
V.; II. H. Cian.son. Buffalo, N. Y. ; W. L. Walsh, Chicago, 111.; 
Herman Boyd, Indianapolis; C. O. Hardman. Springfield, 
Ohio; R. \V. DuSell, Aurora. 111.; A. II. Crocker, Chicago, 



111.; L. C Woodfill, Kokomo, lnd.; V. Holder, Chicago; C. M. 
Anderson, Chicago; R. V. Peterson, Chicago; H. A. French, 
Baltimore, Md. ; J. F. Kilham, Beverly, Mass.; F. L. Hunt. 
Rochester, N. Y. ; A. D. Cook, Rochester. N. Y.; W. W. 
Ingram, Rutland, 111. ; C. W. Hulse, New Haven, Conn. ; 
Elmer Hostetter, Kokomo, lnd.; Will C Studdiford, Ko- 
komo, lnd. ; Noble Shepherd, "Kokomo, lnd. ; Rob. Baxter, 
Grand Rapids, Mich. ; Jos. H. Porsson, Grand Rapids, Mich. ; 
B. A. Swenson, Providence, R. I. ; F. E. Wilkinson, Provi- 
dence, R. I.; L. J. Mueller, Cleveland, Ohio; P. B. Whitney, 
Springfield, Mass. ; Chas. T. Henderson, Springfield, Ohio ; 
A. L. Miller, Indianapolis, lnd. ; O. P. Hewlett, St. Louis, Mo. ; 
Fred E. Glynn, Pittsburg, Pa. ; A. P. Knight, Greensburg, Pa. ; 
A. E. Griffith, Reading, Pa. ; Whipple, The Motor Cycle Man, 
Chicago ; C. R. Strayer, Kokomo, lnd. ; Frank Walling, Owego, 
N. Y.; C. K. Ball. Owego, N. Y.; LeRoy Cook, New York 
City ; Frank L. Berry, Kansas City, Mo. ; Rex Earlywine, Peru, 
lnd. ; A. R. Oberwegner, Toledo, O. ; J. A. Kennedy, Chicago 
Geo. F. Wolff, Chicago, 111. ; Chas. J. Berrick, Buffalo, N. Y. 
John Nervy, Kokomo, lnd. ; S. J. Chubbuck, Toledo, O. 
Chas. W. Sickle. Hammond, lnd. ; D. L. Spraker, Ko- 
komo ; Jos. DeSalvo, Chicago ; A. G. Lyon, Chicago ; R. J. 
Buxe. Louisville, Ky. ; P. J. Kuhn, Jr., Louisville, Ky. ; L. H. 
Cornish, New York City; D. C. Spraker, Indiana; Geo. W. 
Reinbold, Philadelphia ; R. R. Bowen, Kokomo ; J. McCarver, 
Indianapolis ; G. H. Snyder, South Bend, lnd. ; J. H. Smith. 
South Bend, lnd. ; Frank D. Farber, Indianapolis ; Eldridge 
Carter, Indianapolis; G. S. Patterson, Indianapolis; Christian 
Zehring, Kokomo, lnd. 

The parade Wednesday afternoon was viewed by thousands 
of interested spectators who lined the sidewalks, and it re- 
ceived much favorable comment, although it was not up to the 
expectations of the promoters. Many riders preferred to 
spend the afternoon at the speedway, while others were out 
of the city, the Kokomo trip, among other things, depleting 
their ranks. The procession was headed by the Indianapolis 
motorcycle police — Stone, Wilson, Todd and Gibney. The 
riders were decorated with red and blue, the convention colors, 
and they carried pennants. 

For Thursday evening the committee had planned a pleas- 
ant surprise for the visitors in an evening's entertainment at 
the German Club. Here in a typical German family garden, 
with an excellent band of music, vaudeville and refreshments 
were supplied in nice proportion. Friday evening Suburban 
Park was the scene of some clever boxing bouts interspersed 
with song and, of course, refreshments and generous "hand- 
outs" of lunch. 



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nxnait Preparatory to Parading Through the Streets of Indianapolis. 



A LIST OF THE VISITORS 



IN addition to those whose names have already been men- 
tioned in connection with the endurance run, the conven- 
tion, the speedway races or as being members of any of the 
committees in charge, there were present at the F. A. M. 
meet in Indianapolis last week the following: 

A. J. Musselman, American Motor Cycle Company, Chicago ; 
W. G. Shack. Emblem Manufacturing Company, Angola, 
N. Y. ; Oscar Hedstrom, Hendee Manufacturing Company, 
Springfield, Mass.; Edward W. Buffum, Merkel-Light Motor 
Company, Pottstown, Pa.; W. T. Marsh, American Motor 
Company, Brockton, Mass. ; George P. Jenkins, M. M. agent in 
New York; Eugene C. Kircherer, N. S. U. Motor Company, 
New York; Fred Voelker, N. S. U. Motor Company, New 
York ; Percy Pierce, Pierce Cycle Company, Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
Messrs. Ives, Sayre and Ball, of the Reliance Motorcycle Co., 
Owego, N. Y. ; A. B. Coffman, Consolidated Manufacturing 
Company, Toledo, O. ; Charles Van Syckle, captain of the Chi- 
cago Motorcycle Club: twenty riders constituting the Clan 
Excelsior, of Chicago; G. M. Blodgett, of the New England 
Automobile Journal, of Providence, R. I.; Leonard Patterson, 
of the Atlantic City, N. J., Automobile Club; A. B. Weschler, 
sales manager of the Hendee Manufacturing Company, of 
Springfield. Mass. ; Bert Holden, captain of the Springfield, 
Mass., Motorcycle Club; John F. Fisher, manager of the Chi- 
cago Indian branch office; President Howard A. French, of 
the Baltimore Club; F. R. Casebeer, Terre Haute; Eugene 
Gaestel, New York; Harvey Bernard and Oakley Fisher, Mil- 
waukee ; J. Boyd Anderson, Elizabeth City, N. C. ; Walter 
Berner, Indianapolis : Gus Wadsworth, Newport, Ky. ; F. G. 
Crockett, Indianapolis; H. H. Holstein, Indianapolis; Irving 
Howich and Harvey F. Nixon, of Dayton, O. ; Raymond Sey- 
mour, .Los Angeles; James Oldacre, J. A. Sink and John 
Merz. of Indianapolis; Charles S. Spencer, Springfield; to- 
gether with scores of others, some of them coming as repre- 
sentatives of clubs, and others in simply a personal capacity. 

The following is a list of those whose names were reg- 
istered at the headquarters of the Indiana Club. The list 
shows the representation of visitors according to States: 

Connecticut. — A. H. Harop, New Britain: C. W. Hulse, 
New Haven; Stanley Kellogg, Bridgeport; W. R. Mac- 
Guyer, Waterbury; Chas. Swanson, New Britain. 

Rhode Island.— B. A. Swenson, Providence; T. E. Wil- 
kinson, Providence. 

Georgia. — C. S. Elyea, Atlanta; V. V. Chambers, Rome; 
W. H. Moss, Rome. 

Kentucky. — Gus Wadsworth, Newport; Carl H. O'Bar- 



nier, Flemingsburg; C. W. McDaniels, Ashland; B. C. Og- 
den, Ashland; R. Alfred Hayes, Louisville; Leonard W. 
Doolan, Louisville; R. L. Davis, Louisville; R. J. Buxe, 
Louisville. 

Kansas. — D. B. Simpson, Topeka. 

Maryland. — Howard A. French, Baltimore. 

Pennsylvania.— Geo. W. Reinbold, Philadelphia; W. 
Bewley, Reading; W. F. Remppis, Reading; Chas. D. 
Foht, Erie; W. N. Reinhard, Erie; R. K. Mendle, Pitts- 
burg; Lyle Geiger, Pittsburg; A. G. Schmidt, Pittsburg; 
M. P. White, Pottstown; W. G. Teubner, Pottstown; Ed- 
ward Buffum, Pottstown; J. F. Merkel, Pottstown; Ed- 
win G. Muller, Johnstown. 

California. — B. E. Seymour, Los Angeles; Eddie Lingen- 
felder, Los Angeles. 

North Carolina.— J. Boyd Anderson, Elizabeth City. 

New York.— H. B. Lyon, New York City; Fred Voelker, 
New York City; E. C. Kicherer, New York City; B. Smits, 
New York City; F. L. Hunt, Rochester; Harold J. Levis, 
M.D., Rochester; A. D. Cook, Rochester; John Glos, An- 
gola; M. E. Gale, Angola; C. R. Bailey, Binghamton; H. J. 
Wehman, Brooklyn; Mrs. H. J. Wehman, Brooklyn; Law- 
rence B. Sperry, Brooklyn; F. S. Elliot, Elmira; G K. 
Ball, Owego; Sanford Davison, Owego; Frank Walling, 
Owego; Dr. Chas. J. Berrick, Buffalo; F. B. Series, Buffalo; 
H. B. Alderman, Buffalo; Henry J. Keifler, Buffalo; W. G. 
Schack, Buffalo; H. H. Ganson, Buffalo; Albert H. Peters, 
Buffalo; L. J. Fypperman, Buffalo; Percy 'P. Pierce, Buf- 
falo; Le Roy Cook, New York City; John B. Tower, New 
York City; H. E. Weber, New York City; F. A. Valiant, 
New York City; Earle L. Ovington, New York City; Dr. 
Thornley, New York City; A. E. Griffith, New York City; 
R. G. Betts, New York City; A. G. Chappie, New York 
City; L. H. Cornish, New York City; J. F. McLoughlin, 
New York City; J. Leo Sauer, New York City. 

New Jersey. — George C. Smith, Newark. 

Massachusetts.— J. F. Kelham, Beverley; P. B. Whitney, 
Springfield; Oscar Hedstrom, Springfield; Chas. S. Spen- 
cer, Springfield; J. Weschler, Springfield. 

Michigan.— C. H. Drude, Detroit; Robert Molte, Detroit; 
Fred Kicherer, Detroit; R. M. Hunter, Detroit; D. T. 
Klarts, Detroit; Jos. H. Poissin, Grand Rapids; J. H. Krih- 
genge, Grand Rapids; N. J. Houze, Grand Rapids; J. H. 
Houze, Grand Rapids; J. Arkema, Grand Rapids. 

Minnesota. — A. L. Keck, Minneapolis; Wm. Edwards, 
Minneapolis; F. C. Legg, Minneapolis. 



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August 15, 1909. 



Missouri. — Frank L. Berry, Kansas City; John Hen^ck, 
St. Louis; J. B. Mueller, St. Louis; Tim Bahnsen, St. Louis; 
Ralph Wilson, St. Louis; Chas. F. Van Horn, St. Louis; 
P. H. Orr, St. Louis. 

Wisconsin.— S. Lacy Crolius, Milwaukee; Walter David- 
son, Milwaukee; F. A. Berner, Milwaukee; H. T. Roberts, 
Milwaukee; Wm. S. Harley, Milwaukee; Ralph D. Spor- 
leder, Wauwatosa. 

Ohio. — C. H. Maraurille, Akron; Edw. C. Gammeter, 
Akron; F. F. Broulette, Akron; G. G. Crandall, Akron; 
Jacob J. Sacks, Cincinnati; R. W. Lucas, Cincinnati; Theo. 

D. Wetterstroem, Cincinnati; A. K. Sanders, Cincinnati; 
John L. Austin, Cincinnati; Harry Beach, Cincinnati; C. 
Tettenborn, Cincinnati; Herman Wessel, Cincinnati ;E. L. 
Dearking, Cincinnati; C. A. Schima, Cincinnati; Chas. 
Laile, Jr., Cincinnati; E. H. Adams, Cincinnati; Clarence 
Rossiter, Cincinnati; Lewis Gedein, Cleveland; Arthur W. 
Lees, Cleveland; Robert S. Gray, Cleveland; W. J. Lister, 
Cleveland; Andrew H. Davis, Cleveland; B. A. Quayle, 
Cleveland; L. J. Mueller, Cleveland; E. T. Day, Columbus; 
J. E. Stormant, Columbus; J. T.^Shuster, Columbus; A. C. 
Edwards, Columbus; J. G. de ^ruchy, Columbus; E. L. 
Morse, Columbus; H. B. Allen, Dayton; J. C. Turpin, 
Dayton; J. W. Graham, Dayton; Irving Howich, Dayton; 
Harvey F. Nixon, Dayton; Walter Anderson, Dayton; W. 
H. Rossiter, Dayton; L. M. Brannon, Dayton; Jos. A. Mc- 
Kenny, Dayton; Clem G. Schwieterman, Dayton; Henry 

F. Detzel, Dayton; E. M. Jamson, Middletown; C. O. 
Hardman, Springfield; Chas. T. Henderson, Springfield; 
A. B. Coffman, Toledo; A. R. Oberwegner, Toledo; O. J. 
Oberwegner, Toledo. 

Illinois. — A. C. Hall, Aurora; R. U. Du Sell, Aurora; 
Harry R. Hedges, Chicago; H. N. Kirk, Chicago; Morris 

E. Corley, Chicago; G. H. Wuster, Chicago; F. W. Nel- 
son, Chicago; C. M. Anderson, Chicago; Geo. W. Sher- 
man, Chicago; C. H. Lang, Chicago; G. J. Gentleman, Chi- 
cago; Fred Huyck, Chicago; David Griffiths, Chicago; Er- 
nest H. Danielson, Chicago; H. E. Richardson, Chicago; 
H. Bernard, Chicago; E. L. Hess, Chicago; G. M. Greene, 
Chicago; John C. Hosman, Chicago; R. E. Underhill, Chi- 
cago; Geo. F. Wolff, Chicago; F. D. Storm, Chicago; J. S. 
Tormey, Chicago; G. H. Squier, Chicago; A. H. Crocker, 
Chicago; F. B. Hart, Chicago; J. S. Wood worth, Chicago; 
H. T. Adams, Chicago; A. G. Lyon, Chicago; D. Dunn, 
Chicago; Jos. De Salvo, Chicago; J. G. Turner, Chicago; 

G. W. Lyon, Chicago; Geo. E. Covington, Chicago^ A. 
Kestocher, Chicago; Lovell Gillespie, Danville; A. C. 
Byerly, Danville; A. B. Porter, La Salle; Sam G. Lauter- 
bach, Mendola; W. W. Jugsam, Rutland; A. C. Straus- 
bury, Canton. 



Indiana. — Charles W. Brand, Lafayette; E. C. Clapper, 
Lafayette; H. C. Roth, Lafayette; R. L. Kenny, Lafayette; 
Leland Radford, Martinsville; Herbert Frick, South Port; 
Joseph C. Smith, La Porte; Paul Helm, Lebanon; D. L. 
Spraker, Kokomo; J. B. Morrow, Kokomo; J. Fred Probst, 
Terre Haute; Chas. Weatherhead, Elkhart: Wm. Jacob, 
Crown Point; Rosco Heil, Crown Point; Fred Thomas, 
New Castle; A. R. Pierce, New Castle; 1. D. Pouch, New 
Castle; Elmer S. Smith, Richmond; Chas. A. Tangeman, 
Richmond; H. J. Bauer, Lafayette; J. Gallagher, Lafayette; 
Noble Shelby, Lebanon. 

Indianapolis, Indiana. — Chas. Wyatt, Harry Dipple, 
Robt. H. Sturm, Harry Graff, G. H. Hamilton, F. I. Willis, 
L. M. Wainwright, John Hohl, Chas. H. Foley, C. R. 
Scott, Harry C. Stevens, Frank Sloan, Wm. Adair, G. C. 
Hert, Karl Erath, F. W. Erath, Paul E. Kottlowski, H. R. 
Bretney, Joseph Quessigoin, Ocie M. Jones, Harry Dam- 
son, F. A. McNorton, E. J. Kelsa, Philip S. Brown, J. C. 
Rickerts, Albert C. Gibney, F. O. Minter, F. G. Crockett, 
Eldridge Carle, John A. Sink, M. S. Hodgin, Jno. E. Merz, 
Chas. E. Merz, Oscar Hasse, Henry Gollinski, Geo. E. 
Hofer, Billy Grimes, A. L. Miller, Leslie R. Boone, Erwin 
G. Baker, H. A. Pope, A. B. Colbs, Jack Rice, G. H. West- 
ing, Fred Teuter, H. H. Hollstein, J. V. Hofmann, G. W. 
Stephens, Ray J. Bronson, Carl M. Davis, J. E. Oldacre, 
Wm. McCoy, Gus Habich, A. Mariana, P. C. Hudson, H. 
A. Githens, Chas. F. Ball, O. F. McLain, W. Wallerich, 
S. E. Berry, Elbert Jenkins, A. B. Cobb, Brandt Steele, C. 
L. Bornscheim, O. H. Talent, Wm. F. Schlegel, C. C. 
Hendrickson, L. A. Chapman, Herman Boyd, R. T. Friend, 
C. E. Armstrong. 

The officers of the Indiana Motorcycle Club, which en- 
tertained the visitors so well, are Charles Wyatt, president; 
H. L. Dipple, vice-president; Harry Graff, treasurer; 
Robert Sturn, secretary; L. M. Wainwright, G. H. Hamil- 
ton and F. I. Willis, directors. 

The various committees in charge of the arrangements 
for the meet were thus constituted: 

Executive — Charles Wyatt, chairman; H. L. Dipple, 
Harry Graff, Robert H. Sturn, L. M. Wainwright, G. H. 
Hamilton and F. I. Willis. 

Finance — Gus Habich, chairman; F. I. Willis and 
George C. Detch. 

Press — G. W. Stephens, chairman; F. O. Minter. 

Programme — H. A. Githens, chairman; PranR B. Willis 
and Lee Chapman. 

Entertainment — G. H. Westing, chairman; Harry Graff 
and John McGarver. 

Prizes — W. D. Dean, chairman; C. E. Ball and P. C. 
Hudson. 




At the Country Club at Kokomo. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Vol. IV. 



AUGUST is, 1909. 



No. 16. 



Published 

Twice a Month, 1st and 15th 

By the 

Motorcycle Publishing Company 



F. P. PRIAL Pre*, and Treas. THOS. HILL LOW, Sec. 



Offices, 299 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Telephone, Worth 3691 



Home Subscriptions, $1.00 Foreiga Subscriptions, $100 
Single Copies, 10 cts. 

Entered as second class matter July 6th, 1908, at the Post Office 
at New York, N. Y., under act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

General Editorial and Business Direction 
F. P. Prial 



J. Leo Sauer 
L. H. Cornish 



Editor 
Advertising 



THE NEW RULES. 

CONFRONTED with a serious crisis, from the stand- 
point of both the F. A. M. and of motorcycle racing 
in the United States, the convention held in Indianapolis 
last week, adopted, as part of the competition rules, an 
article providing for three classes of racing men, private 
owners, trade riders, and professionals. The result was 
a compromise between those who believed in maintaining 
the old order of things and that element which, in its en- 
deavors to provide a new, would probably have gone too 
far. The outcome is by no means a perfect set of rules, 
for there are flaws and loopholes in the new classification; 
but that a vast improvement upon the pitiably faulty two- 
part classification has been made is almost unanimously 
conceded. 

The new rules leave the professional as he was and 
divide the amateur riders into private owners and trade 
riders. The promoter and manufacturer will continue to 
be permitted, of course, to bid for the professional. The 
builders of machines will also have certain privileges with- 
in the trade rider class, inasmuch as this species of racing 
man, as his name implies, is one who has connections with 
the trade, nor need he own the machine he rides. But 
the manufacturer must go no farther than that. He must 
let the private owner alone. In any event, that is posi- 
tively the stand this paper will take, as long as the newly 
adopted rules are in force. The definition may not be 
quite impregnable, but we shall do our utmost to prevent 
any successful assault upon the private owner class, and 
seek to expose any scheme having that end in view. We 
shall pursue this course because we believe it to be in 
the interest of the F. A. M., of the sport, and even of the 
manufacturers themselves. They will have their profes- 
sionals and in addition, their trade riders. They should 
ask for no more than that ; this should be tacitly if not im- 
plicitly understood among them. 

The representatives of this paper opposed distinguish- 
ing between alleged different kinds of trade riders on the 
ground that, although such a distinction might seem 
theoretically correct, it was impracticable. It was shown 
that, in many instances, the agent-rider has as many ad- 
vantages as the out-and-out factory track and road race 
representative. If it were possible to draw a clear line 



of demarkation between the trade rider who makes a 
profession of his trade, and the one who makes a pro- 
fession of riding, then it would be possible and just 
to separate the two, and throw the latter among the 
professionals. The powerful A. A. U. has been unable 
to do this; could such a reform, if reform it may be called, 
have been brought about by the F. A. M., growing, it is 
true, but as yet only on infant in the athletic field? It 
remains for the chairman of the competition committee 
to do all in his power to bring about the professional- 
ization of phony trade riders, but to expect him, or the 
convention, for that matter, to solve the entire difficulty 
is to demand too much. It is all well enough to declare 
that some of our amateurs are such in name only; it is 
another thing to prove them so, while it would have been 
a grave mistake to have arbitrarily assumed that the man 
who races as he travels is necessarily paid just for racing, 
or that this man has any great advantage over the local 
trade rider. Experts differ, differ honestly, and who shall 
decide when doctors disagree? 

That, in substance, is the situation which produced the 
new classification. We have passed out of the old order 
of things, not by any means into the new, but upon the 
path which leads to the new. Most important of all, 
the revised competition rules provide, through an iron- 
bound definition, for the wants of the purest amateur of 
them all, the strictly legitimate private owner. That was 
the object primarily sought by the reform element; while, 
on the other hand, the purpose of the opposition to main- 
tain the amateur status of the man who makes his 
trade his profession has also been realized. No complete 
victory has been achieved by either party to the con- 
troversy. Much has been given, and much taken away. 
Most important at all, we have harmony where discord 
had threatened, and personal prejudice placed in jeopardy 
the welfare of the F. A. M., the interests of the sport, and 
the principle of the greatest good to the greatest number. 

The new classification is admittedly an experiment. 
With the passage of time it will have to be improved 
upon. It is in no sense the last word on the subject. 
But it marks the breaking away from idols which we had 
been worshipping with lip prayers only. The conven- 
tion has crushed a fetich, and for that, and that alone, it 
deserves commendation. The new classification, despite 
its imperfections, will, we believe, prove epochal in our 
sport. Finally, we would state that we are by no means 
committed to maintain, simply because we participated 
in its making, that the new classification is the thing. 
On the contrary, we shall, in carefully studying its 
operation, rote and give publicity to that which is either 
good or bad in it. 

A SUCCESSFUL MEET. 

SUCCESSFUL far beyond the expectations of the most 
sanguine, the 1909 F. A. M. meet has passed into 
the history of motorcycling in America. It is a pleas- 
ure indeed to make use of this opportunity to commend 
the energy, the skillful management, and the enthusiasm 
of those who made possible last week's interesting and 
profitable program. The Indianapolis Meet Club, prac- 
tically the hustling Indiana Club, presided over by 
Charles Wyatt, Vice-President-elect of the Western Dis- 
trict, outlined and operated the week's series of events 
as though they had been accustomed to do that sort of 
thing all the time. There was only one hitch, the 
Speedway "frost," and for that it is certain none of the 
committees was responsible. 

The Indianapolis track may be productive of safe and 
fast racing conditions in the course of time; it was only 
too evident to those who went out to .witness the races 
last Saturday that such was not yet the case. On the 
contrary, it was all a rider's life was worth to attempt 
to travel on that rough surface at a rate of more than 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August IS, 1909. 



fifty miles an hour. As it was, De Rosier, one of the 
most clever racing men in the world, sustained a serious 
fall, and that several others did not meet with a sim- 
ilar fate was simply their good fortune. Every starter 
took a great risk, too great a risk in fact, to make any 
effort to win worth while, so that, when the last race on 
the program was announced, there was not a single 
starter. Of course, the crowd was disappointed; so were 
those more intimately concerned. The responsibility can 
be placed nowhere other than upon the shoulders of 
the track owners, who should not have made promises 
which they so dismally failed to keep. They, in their 
turn, blame the weather, it having been persistently wet 
in and about Indianapolis this summer. Aside from this, the 
meet was a magnificent triumph for its promoters. 

THE RETIRING PRESIDENT. 

AFTER a year of service Earle L. Ovington retires as 
president of the F. A. M. He could have been re-elected 
had he and his friends chosen, despite all gossip to the con- 
trary. But he had had enough of it and therefore made no 
effort to be re-elected. For several years Ovington has been 
the most notable personal figure in motorcycling in this 
country. He divided this honor to some extent with another 
gentleman, whose name is known from ocean to ocean. But 
this person referred to has achieved a national reputation 
through his large business enterprise, which has enabled him 
to widely advertise motorcycling and make converts to it. 
Ovington was, himself, always a good advertiser ; but he sup- 
plemented this personally. Since the earliest days of motor- 
cycling he has been an enthusiast. Being well informed on 
every phase of the subject, and being a good talker and ready 
writer, he has made himself heard all over the country. In 
fact he created a large personal following solely through print. 
He is, as writers say, "a splendid figure of a man," and is 
seen to particular advantage en a motorcycle. He has talked 
much and been on view at all important meets. It is impos- 
sible at this moment to measure the influence he has had in 
the development of this sport. Personally he always was and 
is a lovable fellow. It has been said that he talks too much. 
This, however, is due to the fact that he is widely informed 
on many subjects and superficially informed on almost any 
subject. This all-round education and experience, coupled 
with immense vitality, keeps him in a continuous state of bub- 
bling over; but Ovington's bubbles are worth most other men's 
matured thought. We would not wish to seem to over-praise 
Ovington. He is a highly organized man, with wide mechan- 
ical knowledge, fair, broad-minded, big, playful, and above all 
things, honest. The good wishes of all who know him will 
follow him throughout his motorcycle career. 



EXPORT TRADE. 

THE "American Exposition at Berlin, 1910/' has been cir- 
cularizing the American class press to place before the 
American manufacturers the facts about its exposition, which 
is to be held in Berlin next year. The American Advisory 
Committee connected with this exposition represents the best 
class of Germans and German-Americans in this country. 
Notwithstanding that fact we advise the motorcycle trade to 
steer clear of this exposition. Representation in Berlin will 
be very costly; beside that the possibility of selling American 
motorcycles in Germany or in any other Continental country 
are too remote to warrant an American maker in putting up 
a special display at this exposition. The fact is, the American 
motorcycle trade is not yet ready for export business. The 
signs seem to clearly indicate that, for some time to come, the 
home trade will he vital enough and expansive enough to 
occupy all their brains and all their capital. 

It is a matter of tradition that an American manufacturer 
is always tickled to death whenever he gets a foreign inquiry; 



but it is usually a case of much cry and little wool. This 
verdict does not apply to all trades, but to most of them. It 
certainly applies to the motorcycle trade. To follow up the 
export business closely at this time is to chase a will-o'-the- 
wisp. The sale of American-made motorcycles in Continental 
Europe is a dream of the far future. 

THE WILD AND WOOLLY. 

THE "Wild and Woolly," if one can now consider Ohio 
and Indiana the West, continues to retain its enthusi- 
asms. Indeed, one of the chief glories of the West is its 
get-up-and-get-there quality. And this is a big factor, 
whether it be business or play. On the Connersville Hill 
two thousand people lined the course and cheered the 
riders on their way. Along the entire journey — we of 
course mean the Endurance Run — the thing at times 
seemed to be a triumphal procession. The official auto 
kept about a half hour ahead of the caravan of crackling, 
spurting machines. As soon as its occupants had warned 
the country-side that the "dare devils" were coming, the 
entire populace turned out. Farmers drove wagon loads of 
sight-seers to points along the course and stationed them- 
selves under shade trees. Others placed chairs in front 
of their homes and children waved flags. All along the 
route the greeting was uniform and profuse. A splendid 
picture this, of motorcycling, not in the bud, but full-blown. 



PRESIDENT WILLIS. 

FRED WILLIS, the new President of the F. A. M., is 
a man of action, successful in business, original in 
his ideas, and the possessor of a reputation of which he 
may well be proud. True, he is in the trade, but only 
in a minor capacity, insofar as motorcycling is concerned. 
His big interests lie in another field. Mr. Willis has the 
qualifications which spell executive ability; he can do, and 
do easily, a greater work than that of governing the af- 
fairs of the Federation. This does not mean that the 
presidency of the F. A. M. is a small proposition but 
rather that Mr. Willis is a big man, not in stature, but 
in character and ability. The Federation is fortunate 
to be able to enlist the services of an enthusiast like Mr. 
Willis, and we venture to predict for him a happy 
regime, and, under his capable direction, a rapid and healthy 
development for the F. A. M. 



SPRINGFIELD'S TRACK. 

THE Springfield track proved a record breaker, as is told 
elsewhere in this paper. It was inaugurated on July 31, 
and world's records fell by the score; in fact, there was just a 
score and a half of them. The quality of the track is best 
expressed by Huyck's mile in 42H instead of the old world's 
record of 45^. The track is perfectly safe and has an ideal 
location. The sport was in the hands of men of national 
reputation, and nothing occurred throughout the afternoon 
which would point to favoritism. The meet attracted four 
thousand people, who were quietly but sincerely enthusiastic 
over the menu offered them. This Springfield track should 
give a big stimulus to motorcycling in New England, and it 
should be supported by the entire trade. Those manufacturers 
who would win laurels on the path owe it to themselves and 
to the sport to send their men to Springfield the next time a 
meet is held there. But of course they must send good men, 
fast, capable men; for there's a bunch of Indians lurking 
there and thereabout looking for scalps. 



IN the Great Endurance one of the competitors turned a 
complete somersault, "but continued on his way as if 
nothing had happened." 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



21 



DOCTOR THEODORE LEHMANN, of New York, writes 
that he "cannot refrain from saying that the man with 
the dirty machine, whose dress is slovenly, and who makes a 
lot of noise while riding," offers decidedly little encouragement 
to those who may contemplate taking up the sport. The doc- 
tor is quite right. Excessive speed, dirt and noise are re- 
sponsible for all the criticisms which have been directed 
against the motorcycle. Eliminate these, and public prejudice 
will almost immediately disappear, if only because its founda- 
tions will have crumbled utterly away. Since each one of the 
causes named is removable, there is no reason in the world 
why two^wheelcd motor driving should not become one of 
the most attractive and generally popular forms of outdoor 
recreation in America. 

A FAIRLY good line can be gotten on the English 
motorcycle trade from a report of motorcycle ex- 
ports for the week ending July I, published in an Eng- 
lish trade paper. During that week the exports totaled 
$5.775» which, multiplied by fifty-two, makes the total for 
the year $297,000. Of course we do not know whether 
this was an average week, or not; but we have written to 
find out. This product was distributed all over the world, 
particularly among the English colonies. Some of the 
biggest figures are as follows: Melbourne, $1,830; Lyttel- 
ton, $1,100; Singapore, $550; Invercargill, $425; Rotter- 
dam, $250; Brisbane, $360; Bombay, $155; Auckland, $150; 
Cape Town, $170. 

THE Chicago Sunday Tribune of Aug. 8 featured motor- 
cycling, giving it about a half page, with pic- 
tures, etc. It started off like this: "With a Noise 
Resembling The Blast Of An Asthmatic Dragon, The Mo- 
torcyclist Has Chugged His Way Into Prominence." This 
is thrown into big type of the scare-head style. The article 
opens in this yellow vein, but finally gets down to business, 
telling how the motorcycle is coming into its own, etc. There 
is also an interview with F. B. Hart, also a picture of the 
Chicago Motorcycle Club and photographs of a telephone 
lineman and a rural postman. The whole th'ing is good for 
motorcycling. 

THE "Terrible Swede" broke out again this year; he 
always does about this time. Last year he scorched 
from New York to Chicago. This year he burned up the 
roads from New York to Cleveland, doing about six hun- 
dred' miles in twenty-five hours. And the "Terrible 
Swede" is no kid either, but a man in the full flood of 
life; but he's hard as nails. In private the "Terrible 
Swede" is known as B. A. Swenson, of Providence, R. I. 
He's an Indian. 

MOTORCYCLIST killed on Riverside Drive last week, 
young chap, chauffeur. Bad, too bad. But it was 3.15 in 
the morning, he was trying out a new machine, rushing down 
Ninety-eighth street hill driving at ninety an hour, and 
with one eye on the lookout for a policeman, too. .So what 
could you expect ? 

SOME Rochester men are thinking of building a motor- 
cycle race track. They claim that a six-lap track will 
save land and lumber. True enough; but it will not save 
life. A six-lap motorcycle track is a death-trap. If the 
Rochester men build a six-lap track they should be in- 
dicted for murder in the first degree at the first killing, be- 
cause premeditation could easily be proven. The ideal 
motorcycle track at this moment is the Springfield track, 
and that is three laps to the mile. 

PHOENIX, Ariz., has a rider named Early Brawn. 
But in a race he started in he didn't get there, just 
the same. 



COLONEL ALBERT A. POPE. 

ON Tuesday, August 10, Colonel Albert A. Pope died at 
his summer home at Cohasset, Mass. He was sixty- 
six years old. He was not the founder of the bicycle busi- 
ness, but its creator. Other pioneers had preceded him 
by a few years. But Colonel Pope came along — he was 
then less than forty years old and surcharged with vitality 
— and put the business on its feet. He spent money lav- 
ishly, advertised the name Columbia in the remotest cor- 
ners of this and every other country and thus made hun- 
dreds of thousands of converts to bicycling. In every- 
thing that concerned cycling, whether direct or remote, 
Pope money and Pope men were ever to the front. From 
the day he started in the bicycle business all others en- 
gaged in that business were in every way in the second 
class. Colonel Pope occupied the first class entirely and 
completely from start to finish. His climax was marked 
after he had completed that splendid group of factories at 
Hartford, Pope Manufacturing Company's Columbia plant, 
Hartford Wheel Company's bicycle plant, Pope Tube 
Works, Hartford Rubber Works and The Electric Vehicle 
Company. After that came, not exactly the deluge, but 
turmoil, trouble. Colonel Pope was a great man and the 
charm of it all was that his greatness was softened by 
certain qualities which were entirely human. He was not 
of the austere, cold and lofty type, but big, genial, full of 
laughter. He was a rare man, one not often duplicated. 
He bore all the marks of a splendid ancestry. He be- 
longed to the merchant prince class and he looked the 
part and acted it. It is a privilege to publish here this 
slight tribute to his memory. 



CREDIT to the trade! All hail! It's not a rich old 
trade, but a young and hopeful one. Yet it put its 
men and its money behind the Endurance Run. May the 
return be not that 6f the buried talent. 
J* & 
Harry Graff is to be commended for declining the 
Treasurership, when he might have reached forth and 
made it his own. But to have elected three Indianapolis 
men would have been a big mistake. 

All hail to the men who devised the Endurance Run. 
No other course could have served the purpose more 
admirably than did the route between Cleveland and 
Indianapolis, by way of Columbus. 

Now for an affiliation with the A. C. U., and inter- 
national competion. We confidently feel that the Briton 
has absolutely "nothing on us." Let us have an oppor- 
tunity to prove it. 

Say what you will, there's stamina and ingenuity and 
pluck in men who succeed in the face of such obstacles 
as confronted the ninety-six riders on the Endurance. 

Glad to hear Mr. Marsh is one of us again. His re- 
instatement to membership was demanded by every cir- 
cumstance in the premises. 

Hamilton, old chap, tet us extend to you our heartiest 
felicitations. You certainly proved yourself to be the 
man for the job. 

J* & 

Too bad, Hastings. We would like to have had you 
back among the Simon pures, where you belong. 

The Springfield 1910 meet enthusiasts have manifestly 
made an early start. 



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August 15, 1909. 




DE ROSIER TRAVELING A QUARTER MILE IN TEN SECONDS. 

SPRINGFIELD'S INAUGURAL 

Huyck Makes New World's Records One to Five Miles — De Rosier Alters the Slate From Seven to 

Twenty-five Miles. 



•"THE new Springfield track was dedicated to motorcycle 
^ racing on Saturday afternoon, July 31. Three thou- 
sand people were in the seats which bordered the top 
half of the track and several hundred more were inside the 
enclosure; also fifty or more automobiles. The track at 
once proved to be in a class by itself, and relegated all 
other motorcycle paths into the second class. Even Los 
Angeles must now be considered as no longer the last 
word in motorcycle track construction. The new track 
proved a perfect wonder from the standpoint of speed 
and safety. Here are samples: 

Huyck, in a mile trial, flying start, cut the world's record 
from 4sH to 42^, which is quite some cutting. De- 
Rosier, in a mile trial, flying, clipped the old record from 
47 I / i to 43 I s, which is quite some slicing. In a five-mile 
trial Huyck produced a new figure of 3.40H. wiping out 
3-50 , '5» an d finally, in the twenty-five-mile professional race, 
DeRosier spread-eagled his field, and, getting among the 
world's records at the seventh mile, finished out in 
20.i3 2 5. The old figure was 21.38. 

Considering that the track was new to most of the riders 
and that it was a new track anyway, it must be accepted 
that Springfield is the best thing we know of up to the 
present moment. Indeed, after his mile trial, Huyck, who 
had not turned a hair, walked up to the official stand and 
said that he could "beat it." And everybody believed him. 

The new path is absolutely safe for four men. It is a 
third of a mile circuit, is absolutely circular, and forms a 
perfect saucer. It measures five thousand seven hundred 
and sixty-seven feet and eight inches to the lap, and the 
three times' circuit gives five thousand three hundred and 
three feet, or twenty-three feet over the mile. This 
masurement was taken at a point eighteen inches from the 
inner rim of the track. As regards the correctness of the 
measurements. Motorcycle Illustrated has inspected the 
original certificate of Engineer Charles J. Hancock, sworn 
to by Daniel E. Leary. a justice of the peace in Spring- 
field. As for the timing, it was above reproach. The men 
who held the watches were Dr. Thornley, chairman of the 
Competition Committee; Joseph Goodman of the Bicycling 



World and F. P. Prial of Motorcycle Illustrated. In the 
Huyck trial all three watches stopped at 42^, which is 
sufficient proof of the quality of the timers. 

The track is a new pine board circuit set out in the 
fields north of Springfield, and reachable by trolley car. 
At the present time there is an eighth of a mile walk, but 
this, in time, will be abridged by a railway spur. At 
Los Angeles, Jack Prince had noticed that the men always 
made the necessary adjustments on the curves, and after 
a talk with them he decided to experiment with a per- 
fectly circular track. This he has done with great success. 

The meet, by the by, might be called an Indian mati- 
nee, as all the riders were mounted on that type of ma- 
chine, with the sole exception of W. H. Whitmarsh, of 
Providence. He rode an R. S., but did not cut r much 
figure in the racing, though, in a private trial at the end 
of the meet he negotiated a mile in 53^. Away and be- 
yond all other men on the track shone DeRosier, of the 
graceful physique, and with all the tactics of a racetrack 
general. When at full speed he rides faultlessly, is, 
in fact, a part of the machine. In the twenty-five mile 
race, his work, after several miles, became simply fas- 
cinating from its sheer perfection. In the one mile 
amateur, 45 class, Spencer, of Springfield, lowered the 
colors of Gustafson, a town mate, and also beat out 
Fred Huyck. In the one mile professional, class 61, De- 
Rosier easily won. In the three mile amateur race Gus- 
tafson was never headed. In the ten mile professional De 
Rosier had no trouble, and in the ten mile amateur Gus- 
tafson was equally safe all the way. In the twenty-five 
mile professional De Rosier started to leave his field 
from the very crack of the pistol, and as they circled 
around the track lap after lap, they fell still further be- 
hind, though Ruden and Turville put up an effective 
struggle for second place. 

The figures published below best tell the story of the 
events, and those who are cranks on the subject will 
find much pleasure in analyzing them. In the one mile 
trial Huyck made a lap in I3fi, which is perilously near 
ninety miles an hour. In fact, the time for the full dis- 
tance, 42i\s is at the rate of eighty-seven miles an hour. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



23 



DID THE 







L4A0JT(n)^(Kf(SIL[B 

Good ? 




Make 




CERTAINLY— AS USUAL 

Five Excelsiors Started — Four Perfect Scores 

The highest proportion of any make of machine entered. Only two private 
owners to finish perfect on single cylinder machines. One of them an Excel- 
sior, ridden by L. Wipperman of Buffalo, N. Y. Note the number of other 
makes that fell by the wayside. Then draw your own comparisons. 

Excelsior Quality Makes Good Every Time. 

EXCELSIOR SUPPLY COMPANY 



Established 1876 



233-37 Randolph Street 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



STANLEY T. KELLOGG, Eastern Distributor, 2233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 



Kindly always mention the paper when writing to advertisers. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August IS, 1909. 




DeRosier's World's Record— l /z mile, 14M ; 2 /z, 28^ ; 1 mile, 
43^5- Old record, 47J/5. 



A Typical St^rt. 

But the thing was so easily done that no idea of this 
speed was given to the spectators. In the five mile trial 
Huyck covered the miles in 43^, 43^, 44^, 43H and 
44^, which surely is perfect running. 

In the one mile professional trial, De Rosier rode the 
identical machine used by Huyck in his mile trial. It 
was a new twin cylinder, 7 h. p. Indian of the vintage 
of 1910, equipped with Bosch Magneto and G & J tires. 
Iri the twenty-five mile race, in which all the world's 
records' fell from the seventh mile to the finish, De 
Rosier used an Indian fitted with the Pittsfield spark 
coil. 

The three timers have been named. President Oving- 
ton refereed the events, while Stanley T. Kellogg was of 
much service in looking after things in general. Charles 
G. Perceival was fetched up to take care of the press end 
and to start, which he did very nicely, extending Indian 
hospitality to all out-of-town officials. Located in the 
center of the field in a big auto, George M. Hendee saw 
the Balaklava of records. As they fell, one after 
another, he smole softly and inwardly, and when it was 
all over he tenderly took the new record slate back to 
"the factory," and carefully placed in with other Indian 
archives. 

DeRosier's Twenty-five Miles. 



0.48^ 

1.36^ 

2.23H 

310^ 

3.58K5 

446 

5 34 

6.23 

*Q 7-11*5 



I 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

*7 
*8 



*io 8.00^ 

*n 8.48^5 

*I2 9.3&A 

♦13 10.26V5 

*I4 1115H 

*I5 12.04^ 

*i6 12.52^ 

*I7 *342 



*i8 1430^5 

*io i5-i9 2 /5 

*20 16.0SH 

*2I 16.57^ 

*22 1/45 H 

*23 18.34*$ 

*24 IQ.24 2 4 

♦25... 20.13^ 



♦World's records. Old record, 21.38. 



Huyck's World's Record.—^ mile, 14^; 2 / 3 mile, 28%; 1 
mile, 42\i. Old record, 45%. 




Huyck's Five Mile Trial. 

mile o.43+i 

miles 1.27^ 

miles 2.12 

miles 2.555^ 

miles 3-40 l A 



Old 
Record. 



137 
2.26** 

3I7J* 
3-59^ 



One Mile Amateur, 45 class. — Won by Charles S. Spencer, 
Springfield; 2, Charles Gustafson, Springfield; 3. Fred. Huyck, 
Chicago. Time, .S7f£. 

One Mile Professional, 61 class. — Won by Jacob DeRosier, 
Springfield; 2, Carl Ruden, Manchester, N. H.; 3, Charles 
Turville, Philadelphia. Time, -47fl 

Three Mile Amateur, 45 class. — Won by Charles Gustafson ; 
2, Walter Goerke ; 3, Charles Spencer. Time -55*i» i-47$i* 
2.40^. 

Ten Mile Professional, 61 class. — Won by Jacob DeRosier; 
2, Carl Ruden; 3, Charles Turville, Philadelphia. Time 
9.11^. 




The Infield. 



Huyck Doing 42 3-5. 

Ten Mile Amateur, 45 class. — Won by Charles Gustafson; 
2, Walter Goerke; 3, Charles S. Spencer. Time, 8.55 7^. 

Twenty-five Mile Professional, 61 class. — Won by Jacob De- 
Rosier; 2, Carl Ruden; 3, Charles Turville. Time, 20.13^. 

LA SALLE, 111.— The La Salle Motorcycle Club has de- 
cided to hold a race meet at the track at La Salle on 
Labor Day. The programme will consist of five or six motor- 
cycle events. The track is one of the best in the State. 
For entry blanks send to A. B. Porter, 937 First street, 
La Salle, 111. 

Jt J* 

ER. JENKINS, of Des Moines, has closed a contract 
• with the State fair management for a series of races 
that will be held at the fair grounds in the afternoons of 
Sept. 2 and 3. The races will include a five-mile free-for- 
all, a five-mile event against time, a five-mile race for stock 
machines and a one-mile against time. 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



25 



PERFECT SCORES 

and GOLD MEDALS 



FOR THE 



<ffim 



TRADE MARK 



*I In the National F. A. M. Endurance Run 
were won by Private Owners, which again 
proves that it does not take a factory ex- 
pert to win on a THOR. 

fl Quality and efficiency such as that of the 
THOR will always stand by the man who 
purchases a THOR Motorcycle. 



Aurora Automatic Machinery Co. 

MEMBER M. M. A. 

THOR BUILDING, CHICAGO - 



! 



% 



I 



Distributors f 



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26 MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED August 15 ? 19G9. 



MORE 



REG 



OUT of the 103 entrants in the 1909 F. A. M. Endur- 
ance and Reliability Contest, 69 chose G & J Tires 
as the safest and most reliable equipment for their 
machines. The tire equipment on the other 34 machines was 
distributed among six different makes — the nearest competitor 
having 15 machines. 

There were 37 perfect scores made, 25 of which were 
made on G & J Tires. 

Isn't the above score sufficient proof that G & J Motor- 
cycle Tires stand up the best — that they are the safest and 
most reliable to use? 

Get our catalog illustrating and pricing the different 
styles, also listing our complete line of valuable motorcycle 
accessories. 



G&JIlRG 



Kansas City Pittsburg Atlanta Boston 

Cleveland Los Angeles St. Louis Portland 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



27 



)RDS FOR 



IRES 



OVER 80% of all the Motorcycles entered in the Races 
held in Indianapolis, August 14th, were equipped with 
G & J Tires. Out of the seven events held G & J 
Tires won 5 firsts, 5 seconds and 6 thirds. , 

None of the riders using G & J Tires experienced any 
tire troubles whatsoever except two punctures from sharp pieces 
of stone; and these two tires were worn thin from riding before 
the races started. 

G & J Motorcycle Tires proved in these races, as in all 
others, to be the fastest, the safest and the most satisfactory 
to use. 

You always stand a much better chance of winning when 
you use G & J Tires. 



>. 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



Detroit 
Chicago 



New York 
San Francisco 



Denver 
Buffalo 



Philadelphia 
Toledo, O. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



A CLEAN-UP FOR 
STUBBS AT WACO, 
TEX., RACE MEET 





Robert Stubbs. 

LARGE crowds attended the series of motor races held 
under the auspices of the Waco Fair Association and 
the automobile and motorcycle clubs of Waco, Texas, dur- 
ing the week of July 26. The summaries: 

Nine miles, free for all — First, Ed Hasha (Indian); sec- 
ond, R. E. Walthour (Excelsior); time, 10.40. 

Twelve miles, for twins not exceeding 50 cubic inches 
piston displacement — First, Robert Stubbs (Indian); sec- 
ond, Ed Hasha (Indian); time, 13.20^. 

Twelve miles, for single cylinder machines not exceed- 
ing 30.50 cubic inches piston displacement — First, R. E. 
Walthour (Excelsior) ; second, Ed Hasha (Indian) ; time, 
14.26. 

Fifteen miles, free for all, handicap — First, Ed Hasha 



R. E. Walthour. 

(Indian); second, Robert Stubbs (Indian); third, R. E. 
Walthour (Excelsior); time, 17.42^. 

Nine miles, for twins not exceeding 50 cubic inches 
piston displacement — Won by Stubbs on an Indian. In this 
race Hasha punctured a tire and was out of it very early 
in the contest. Stubbs* time was 10.14. 

Nine miles, for single cylinder machines not exceeding 
30.50 cubic inches piston displacement — First, Stubbs 
(Indian); second, Walthour (Excelsior); time, 11.06. 

Nine-mile handicap race for singles — Won by Walthour, 
on an Excelsior; Hasha, on an Indian, was second. Time, 
10.31. 

Nine-mile handicap pursuit race — Won by Stubbs, on 
an Indian. 



ON July 27 Clarence Huffmann, an employee of the Tiger 
Cycle Works Co., left their employ without giving any 
notice and went his way, taking with him (without any one's 
permission but his own) a brand new 1909 Model Curtiss 
S. C, z l A h. p. motorcycle, enamelled French gray, No. 5182, 
shod with Morgan & Wright 26 x 2j4-in. Bailey tread tires 
and equipped with a Neverout separate generator motorcycle 
gas lamp, an Ever Ready speedometer, a flexible bullfrog 
horn, 3-in. bell and a Curtiss combination stand and luggage 
carrier. He also took with him assorted sundries, a pair of 
side spring leggins and a gold filled hunting case watch and 
a gold fob, the watch having engraved on the back, on the 
inside cover, the following : "Century Road Club of America 
100-Mile Run, TQ02, won by H. A. Gliesman. Time, 5 hours 
and 20 mins." 

The fob represented a statue of Victory presenting a wreath 



to a cyclist and had on its upper part a diamond of a little 
under a half carat, and on the back was engraved, "Century 
Wheelmen of New York Mileage Competition, 1902, won by 
H. A. Gliesman; 7.892 miles." 

The young man is about five (5) feet seven (7) inches in 
height and of slight build, has blue eyes, light hair and rosy 
cheeks. He will very likely be wearing a Reading Standard 
sweater and a black cap. It is also very likely that, if he has 
not already done so, he will apply for a position as bicycle 
and motorcycle repairman, and he will represent himself to be 
an expert in both lines, although he is neither. He will claim 
to hail from the Pacific Coast. 

The Tiger Cycle Works Co. will pay a reward of $25 to any 
one furnishing information that will lead to his apprehension 
and to the recovery of the machine, watch and fob. Send any 
such to the Tiger Cycle Works, 782 Eighth avenue, New 
York City. 



THE following is the list of motorcycle races which will be 
conducted in connection with the automobile carnival at 
Lowell, Mass., September 10, 1909, 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. : Event 
No. 1 — Flying mile trials for Speed King Trophy. Actual cash 
value of trophy, $50. Entry fee, $5. Event No. 2 — Two laps, 
limited to private owners with machines of less than 55 cubic 
inches piston displacement without auxiliary exhaust ports. 
First, second and third prizes having actual cash value of $50. 
Entry fee, $5. Event No. 3— One lap open. First, second and 
third prizes having actual cash value of $50. Entry fee, $5. 
Event No. 4 — Two laps for cash prizes. First, $100; second, 



$50; third, $25. Entry fee, $10. Event No. 5 — Two laps, lim- 
ited to machines having engines of 30^ cubic inches piston dis- 
placement or less. First, second and third prizes having actual 
cash value of $50. Entry fee, $5. Event No. 6 — Ten laps open 
for Lowell Automobile Club Trophy. Actual cash value of 
trophy, $100. Second and third prizes given. Entry fee, $10. 
All the prizes, with the exception of the Lowell Automobile 
Club Trophy and cash, will be in the form of cups. All cups 
guaranteed sterling silver. Entries, which close August 31, 
should be made to the Lowell Automobile Club, Lowell, 
Mass. 



THE Detroit Motorcycle Club announces a race meet for 
Sept. 2, to be held on the State Fair Grounds under 
the auspices of the Michigan State Fair Association, who 



have received an F. A. M. sanction. Entry blanks may be 
obtained from the secretary of the Detroit M. C, 206 St Au- 
bin avenue, Detroit. 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



29 




98 PER CENT. 

The Best Record 




In the F. A. M. Endurance Run Last Week 



WAS MADE BY 



MEN WHO RODE MERKEL MACHINES 

EVERY ONE of the SEVEN 
MERKEL Starters FINISHED 

Scoring 6,908 out of a possible 7,000 points— a percentage 
of 98. Better than that of any other machine of which 
more than one started. 

FOUR PERFECT SCORES 

The other three had 990, 975 and 943 points. IF THAT 
DOESN'T MEAN BOTH SPEED and RELIABILITY, 
WHAT DOES ? With the MERKEL you get there 
and you get there on time. 

Merkel- Light Motor Company 




POTTS TOWN, PA. 



OVINGTON MOTOR CO.. 2234 Broadway, New 
York Distributors. 

OLLIER & WORTHINGTON, 1100 8. Main St., 
Lot Angeles; 600 Golden Gate Ave., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., Taclflc Coast Distributors. 

CATALOG OR REQUEST. 




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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August IS, 1909. 



SWENSON'S WONDERFUL RIDE. 




B. A. Swenson. 

IN an effort, which proved successful, to better the time 
that he made over the New York to Chicago course 
last year, B. A. Swenson, the "Terrible Swede," Indian 
agent in Providence, R. I., rode from the metropolis to 
Cleveland in twenty-five hours' riding time, as compared 
with thirty hours for the same distance — about six hun- 
dred miles — last summer. Swenson left New York at 
three o'clock Friday morning, reaching Cleveland at 5:45 
p. m., Saturday. The Providence man completed his re- 
markable ride in fine physical condition, and his machine 
was apparently none the worse for the grueling test to 
which it had been subjected. Swenson not only ex- 
perienced no ill results, but he also, and with ease, scored 
perfectly in the endurance run. His trip to Cleveland 
was made by way of Poughkeepsie, Albany, Buffalo and Erie. 

The journey from Poughkeepsie to Albany was made in 
a pouring rain, the roads becoming so muddy that Swen- 
son was compelled to remove his guards and strap them 
to his back. Between Amsterdam and Little Falls Swen- 
son met George Cole, who was riding from Tacoma to 
New York. Cole was mounted on an Excelsior. Be- 
tween Syracuse and Albany the Rhode Islander lost one 
hour and twenty-five minutes making tire repairs, after 
which he traveled forty miles in the dark, reaching Roch- 
ester at 10 o'clock. 

Swenson started off from Rochester at 7 o'clock Satur- 
day morning and came into Buffalo at 9:45. Thence he 
went on to Erie, and thus to Cleveland, covering the 
distance between Erie and his destination in three hours. 

An equally hazardous journey, though his time was by 
no means fast, was made by C. P. Rodgers, from Yon- 
kers. N. Y. Rodgers started the day before Swenson 
and reached Cleveland Monday evening, being one of the 
last to file his entry. 

In charge of J. S. Woodworth and H. T. Adams, twenty 
men, constituting the Clan Excelsior, made the trip, 
merely for pleasure purposes, from Chicago to Indianapo- 
lis, arriving Wednesday afternoon. 
J J* 

A BIG crowd enthused in fitting fashion over the races 
held at Grand Rapids, Mich., recently. The sum- 
maries: Five miles, for single cylinders: Poisson (Indian), 
first; Lemon (Indian), second; time, 6.30. Five miles, for 
twin-cylinders — Won by Stuart on an Indian; time, 5.54! ->. 



NEARLY 1,800 MILES IN 15 DAYS. 

MM. CORNWELL and C. A. Johndall, Thor riders, 
• have arrived in Denver from Buffalo, New York, 
having made the trip, a distance of 1,792 miles, in fifteen days. 
Their khaki suits were much the worse for wear and their 
black leggings almost shredded in numerous meetings with 
barbed-wire fences. 

Cornwell and Johndall started from Buffalo the morning 
of July 29 to visit Max Garmatter, who is employed as a 
watchmaker at the Joe Schwartz Jewelry company in Denver. 

"From Buffalo to Boone, Iowa, we had splendid roads. 
From there, however, we had to take to the railroad tracks, 
as the severe rainstorms had made the roads practically im- 
passable. We rode about 250 miles on the tracks," said Corn- 
well. 

"Had it not been for the Glidden tourists' circulars, which 
were distributed, we should never have found our way across. 
In some places we found practically no roads, what were 
called roads being merely trails.'* 

PHOENIX, Ariz., July 29--At the fair held here to- 
day two motorcycle races were the star features 
of the programme. Eight hundred people were present, 
and the governor of the State, Sloan, "got on his legs and 
hollered" as the machines sprinted down the home 
stretch. Summary: Ten Miles: — 1, Victor Redewill; 2, F. 
A. Carr; 3, C. I. Stacey, all on 3V 2 Indians. Time, 12:56^. 
Five Miles: — 1, Victor Redewill; 2, C. I. Stacey; 3, F. A. 
Carr, all on Indians. Time, 6:30. One Mile Exhibition: — 
F. A. Carr, 1:07^. 

MILFORD, Ind., has a very great day each year. It is 
called Onion Day — or is it Union Day? At any rate, 
one of the celebrations of this great day, be it patriotic or 
vegetable in origin, was a motorcycle race over a three-mile 
track. Verne Yoder on an Excelsior won; Roy Miller on 
a Harley- Davidson was second; C. Brinelley on a Yale was 
third. Time, 4.20. There was also a pie-eating contest — 
but that's enough. 

& S 

EE. SEABURG is making arrangements to conduct a 
• series of races at Galesburg, 111., the 25th of this 
month. The programme will comprise one, five, fifteen 
and twenty-five mile events. 

J* & 

FOREST CASEBEER, riding a Harley-Davidson at Terre 
Haute, July 27 last, lowered the record of the famous 
four-cornered track in the 10-mile run, making the distance in 
13 minutes flat. He also won first in the third race and re- 
ceived a gold medal. Casebeer made the last mile of the ten 
in 1 :o7 3-5, which is said to be a a record for a flat track with 
four turns. 




Forest R. Casebeer. 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



31 



The Diamond Medal 

Was not a prize this year, but we got the best they had. 

7 Harley-Davidsons Entered— 6 Finished 

in the most gruelling endurance contest ever held. 

CLEVELAND TO INDIANAPOLIS 

Two private owners finished in the single cylinder class with perfect scores. 
Mr. R. E. Underhill.of Chicago, on a HARLEY-DAVIDSON, was one of them. 




We Won tbe Diamond Medal for Endurance 
at F. A. M. National Meet, 1908 



World's Record for Economy, 50 Miles on 
1 Quart, 1 Ounce of Gasoline 



If it is endurance and economy you want, ride a 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON 

Can Make Immediate Deliveries. Send in Your Order Today 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO., - Milwaukee, Wis. 



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32 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



ON ROAD AND HILL. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y„ Aug. 2.— Twenty-five members of the 
Syracuse Motorcycle Club made the run to Utica and 
return yesterday. The start was made at g o'clock 
and the party reached this city about noon, many 
waiting at New Hartford for the stragglers to arrive. It 
was stated in confidence and for the ear of the reporter 
alone that it was not to be supposed that the party occu- 
pied all the time in making the journey ; for several confessed 
that as much as 50 and 55 miles an hour had been made on 
some parts of the road. None of the party was arrested 
for exceeding the limit, however, so that this statement can 
not be verified. Captain G. W. Fenner and First Lieutenant 
A. W. Brewster frown on all scorchers because of their offi- 
cial position, but yesterday morning they unbent enough to 
outdistance even the most daring of those gentlemen. At the 
entrance to the city on Genesee street the party were pho- 
tographed in costume. Thence the machines were headec 
direct for the Hotel Royal, where a motor meal was served, 
after which the party expressed themselves as ready for any- 
thing that might turn up. They thereupon decided to attend 
the ball game and see if they could not win the game for 
Utica by consistent rooting. The return trip was made in 
time to reach Syracuse early in the evening. 

The machines were of several different makes, and as they 
were arrayed in front of the hotel they attracted consider- 
able attention. Each machine proudly bore a banner bearing 
the club's colors and the initials "S. M. C." The motorists 
expressed themselves as pleased with the trip and promise 1 
to pay the city another visit in the near future. The club h 
a permanent organization with a total enrollment of over 
60 members and with nearly 50 riders. A trip into the country 
is taken every week and proves most enjoyable. The journey 
yesterday was made without accident and in good time. . 

& & 

NEWBURG, X. Y, Aug. 3.— Herb Paffendorf, William 
Callwell, Leonard Herman and Albert Sansbury, start- 
ing from Stubley's garage on their motorcycles Sunday morn- 
ing at 8 o'clock, reaching Warwick about suppertime. Of 
course, they "didn't" dine at the Red Swan Inn. The jolly 
bunch returned about 11 at night. 

Henry Beakes bought a new motorcycle last week, which 
he will use for business purposes as well as pleasure. 

Motorcycles have become so reliable now that they can be 
rented, provided the rider knows how to steer a wheel and 
leaves the adjustment of the machine alone. Many of the 
young bicycle enthusiasts hire "motes" every night, and others 
take them for a day's ride, with more or less good luck. 

Nicholas Arota says he wants to have a ride as soon as he 
gets the use of his arm, which was broken while riding a 
motorcycle recently. He'll have to wait at least a couple of 
weeks. 

There are nearly a dozen motorcyclists coming and going 
at Stubley's garage. There are Sager's Curtiss and Indian, 
Reuben's Pierce, three M-M's belonging to Ed Paffendorf,. 
Bradley and Fisher; Quinlan's Indian, Benedict and Moore 
with M-M's, Thomas's Indian, Walker Stewart's "twin," 
George Moore with a Curtiss and R-S., Leonard Herman's 
Indian and Will Callwell's big four-cylinder Pierce and a 
few more. 

Jt ^ 

WICHITA, Kan., Aug. 2. — A seventy-mile motorcycle 
race and endurance run was run from Wichita to 
Wellington and return yesterday. Eight riders started, and 
every one finished in less than 2 hours and 20 min- 
utes. Max Wilson finished first in 1 hour 56y 2 minutes; 
Wells Bennett finished second in 2 hours and 1 minute; Ray 
Hockaday finished third in 2 hours and 14 minutes. The 
latter was in first place, but when nearing Wellington he 



ran into a ditch in making a turn in the road. One of the 
wheels of his machine was bent and twisted and he had to 
stop to straighten it before he could resume the trip. Gus 
Person, Ray Washaar, C. D. Andrews, Harry Myers ar.d 
A. P. Branson also started. Washaar was well up in the 
race, but when nearing Wellington collided with an auto- 
mobile. His motorcycle was slightly damaged and he was 
injured, but resumed the race after a delay of twelve minutes. 
The route of the race was through Haysville, Peck, Ziba 
and Wellington. Large crowds met the riders along the 
entire route. At the register station at Wellington refresh- 
ments were on hand for the riders and their machine tanks 
were filled with oil and gasoline. It is estimated that more 
than 5,000 people were lined up along the route to cheer the 
riders. 

5 & 

A TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR endurance run has been an- 
nounced for Sept. 5 and 6 by the San Francisco M. C.» 
the course to be over the San Leandro Triangle. It has not 
yet been decided whether the men will ride twenty-four hours 
straightaway, or whether the run will be divided into two 
twelve-hour shifts. The annual endurance run from San 
Francisco to Los Angeles is making good headway. Mr. 
Briggs and C. E. Caughill, two prominent members of the 
Fresno Motorcycle Club, recently arrived at San Francisco on 
a tour of the State, and, in speaking of this contest, they 
promise the hearty support of the Fresno motorists. 

6 «« 

IN covering the distance from Rochester, N. Y., to Chicago 
on a motorcycle Dr. Levis has come close to establishing 
a record for the two-wheel machine. The physician, who 
rode an Excelsior, started from Rochester on Sunday. Aug. 1, 
arrived at Toledo, Ohio, the same day, came on to La- 
porte, Ind., the following day, and reached Chicago on Tues- 
day. The distance covered on the first day was about 368 
miles. Dr. Levis, who is strictly a private rider, left Chicago 
yesterday for Cleveland, from which point he will start on 
Tuesday to take part in the national endurance run to In- 
dianapolis. 

ENTRY blanks are out for the Century Road Club's Vet- 
eran Reunion and Century Run. This is a classic an- 
nual event. The run is scheduled for Aug. 29, from Brooklyn 
to Sayville and return to Jamaica. If it rains the run 
will be held on Sept. 5. There is a motorcycle division 
starting from the Century Road Club House at 1056 Bed- 
ford avenue, Brooklyn, at 9 A. M., reaching Sayville, 35 
miles, at 12.30; East Islip, 63 miles, at 1 P. M., and Jamaica, 
101 miles at 5 P. M. For entry blanks apply to H. J. Weh- 
man, 1203 Bedford avenue, Brooklyn. 

MEMBERS of the Rochester Motorcycle Club tackled 
Methodist Hill, not in an irreligious spirit, however, 
on July 31. The hill climb contest was won by Stauder; Man- 
iey, second; Hill, third, and Bishop, fourth. Stauder also 
won the nine-mile road race, with Man ley second and Van 
Almkirk third. As a topper-off there was an old-fashioned 
sporting match between Manley and Stauder. Stauder was 
beaten. 

THE Brockton Despatch announces that Lottie May Gove 
and Earl G. Gove, the daughter and son of the president 
of the Brockton Mbtorcycle Club, will shortly start on a 
tour of several hundred miles, visiting all the show places 
of New England. The trip will be made on Earl's motor- 
cycle fitted with a tandem attachment. The Gove family are 
enthusiastic motorcyclists. 

CHARLES E. HOGANS, of Houston, Tex., riding a 
5-h.p. Indian, recently established a road-record for 
the route between Morgan's Point and Houston. The 
distance is twenty-eight miles, and Hogans covered it in 
thirty-seven minutes. 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



33 




Again 
The Yale 3% H. P. Motorcycle 

q Establishes a record for Endurance. 

(J In the F. A. M. Endurance Contest, Cleveland to Indianapolis, Aug. 10th and 11th, 
over 380 miles of rough and sandy roads, four Yales started. 

q THREE CAME IN ON TIME, MAKING A CLEAN SCORE WITHOUT A SIN- 
GLE ADJUSTMENT, FINISHING IN PERFECT CONDITION and READY TO 
MAKE THE RUN AGAIN. 

(J July 5th A R. Horn and P. B. Fillmore started from Minneapolis, Minn., arriving at 
New York City the 22d, covering 1,735 miles with only one puncture, and machines in per- 
fect order, ready to return over the same road. 

q On July 9-10-1 lth the Yale team of three riders won the Chicago Motorcycle Club 
Endurance Contest and received the Silver Trophy Cup — 600 miles without a single adjust- 
ment, establishing THE WORLD'S RECORD FOR ENDURANCE. 

(J Remember, battery box, vibrator, carburetter, spark plug and magneto were sealed. 

q DEALERS and RIDERS, WRITE FOR LITERATURE. 

J5he Consolidated Mfg\ Co. 

1730 Fern wood Avenue* Toledo* OHio 
JNO. MOORE ® CO. ... - 59 Warren Street, New YorK Agents 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE MART— IT SELLS THE STUFF 

Buy; Sell; Exchange. Two Cents a Word. Cash With Copy 



FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE 



FOR SALE— 1909 5-h.p. Twin Indian, with tandem ; best 
offer takes it. Perfect order, ridden little over 300 miles. 
T. A. Mauch, Yazoo City, Mich. 

EXCHANGE— One B Model Columbia Motorcycle; two 
Columbia Chainless Bicycles in good condition, one has Pope 
two-speed coaster brake, wanted to exchange for Indian 
motorcycle and small cash difference. A. A. Jordan, Lump- 
kin street, Athens, Ga. 

FOR SALE — 1909 — Four-horse power Harley-Davidson, 
fully equipped, Mesinger cavalry saddle, solar gas lamp, 
separate generator, tandem attachment, with Persons im- 
proved saddle, horn trip, cyclometer, tool kit and leggins. 
Run four hundred miles, in excellent condition, $175. Write 
C. A. Baumann, Perry, Iowa. 

FOR SALE — 1909 Twin Indian, Magneto and full equip- 
ment, $205. Perfect condition. Benj. St. John, Ro way ten, 
Conn. 

FOR SALE — The best-equipped motor cycle in New Eng- 
land. 1909 N. S. U. 6-h.p. twin, complete with fan, two- 
speed gear, horn, 6-inch Rushmore auto lamp, Prestolite 
gas tank, new tires and several extra parts. It cost $450 the 
way it stands ; will sell for $325. Wellington A. Francis, 
164 L'nion street. New Bedford, Mass. 

FOR SALE — F. N. four-cylinder new 1909 model in perfect 
condition, $300. Address "Opportunity," care Motorcycle 
Illustrated. 

FOR SALE at $175 M-M Magneto Motorcycle. Cost $225. 
Uses but little oil. Good as new. Farmers' Bank, Lee's Sum- 
mit, Mo. 



J L 



WHIPPLE The Motorcycle Man 



The best in the world is none too good for our customers. 
Motorcycles and accessories at lowest trrices. Pierce 4 cylinder, 
$^50; Indians, nine models, $175 to $325. Good second hand, 
all kinds, down to $40. Send for our sundry catalog. 

THE MOTORCYCLE MAN 

260 W. Jackson Blvd., CHICAGO 



WHIPPLE 




RED HEAD 

SPELLS 

SERVICE 

Summer and Winter Service. 
Guaranteed Porcelain Service. 
Porcelain or Mica Service. 
Efficient and Economical Ser- 
vice. 
All Sizes d;i r\r\ All 
and Styles ^^.UU Dealers 

Send for Catalog M.W. 

Emil Grossman Company 

Miinitf :i r t II ri-f 

232 Weit 58th St., New York 

CHICAGO: DETROIT: 

1436 Michigan Ave. 872 Woodward Ave. 



AGENTS CARDS, ETC. 



MOTORCYCLES thoroughly overhauled and repaired. 
Agents for Thor motorcycles, parts and sundries. Brazenor 
& Ruderman, 849 Bedford avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



M-M and R-S MOTORCYCLES— East End Cycle Co., 
Highland & Beitler, near Centre avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

FOR SALE — New 5-h.p. twin Indian, $200; second-hand 
5-h.p. twins, $125 up; singles, $75 up. F. B. Widmayer 
Company, 2312 Broadway. New York City. 

FOR BARGAINS in second-hand motorcycles, Merkels. 
Indians and M. M., call at the M. M. Motorcycle store, 38 
Belleville avenue, Newark, N. J. 

MOTORCYCLISTS' friend, black hand cleaner, in small 
collapsible tubes, 15 cents; by mail, 17 cents. Send for sample; 
can be carried in tool bag. F. B. Widmayer Co., 2312 Broad- 
way. New York City. Agents wanted. 

SECOND-HAND M. M. BARGAINS— Exhaust Whistles, 
Hand Idlers. M. M. Branch, 895 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

SECOND-HAND MOTORCYCLES— Of 35 machines ad- 
vertised for sorhe weeks in this colum, we have but seven left. 
The guarantee we give with each one is what sells them. Send 
stamp for information and descriptive circular. Tiger Cycle 
Works Co., 782 Eighth avenue, New York City. 

DISCOVERED — The motorcyclists' best friend on a windy 
night. A positive stormproof lamp lighter, once used, never 
without ; finest thing in the world for smokers ; only 25 cents. 
Tiger Cycle Works Co., 782 Eighth avenue, New York City. 

ADJUSTABLE SIDE CARS will fit any make motorcycles. 
High-grade motor frames made to order, also frame fittings. 
Catalogue. Illinois Motor Cycle Co., 865 South Kedzie avenue, 
Chicago. 

B. & C. Two-Speed and Free Engine Gears; Ideal equip- 
ment for Motorcycles. Bushnell & Cannon, 1268 E. 80th 
place, Cleveland, Ohio. 



NEW EDITION— JUST OUT 

" CONSTRUCTION. MANAGEMENT AND CARE OF MOTORCYCLES" 

Revised and Enlarged— 60 Pages. 25 Cents 

Contents.— The Motor, Mechanical Valves, Working 
of Valves, General Motor Parts, Twin Cylinder Motors, 
Motor Tips, Removing and Replacing Cylinder, Over- 
heating, Piston Rings, Knocking and Pounding, Timing, 
Weak Springs, Life of Motors, Care of Valves, Lubri- 
cation, Ignition, Ignition Troubles, Trouble Chart, Mag- 
netos, Carburetor, Transmission, Spring Forks, Tires, 
Two Speed, Attachable Outfits, Belt Don'ts, Other 
Dont's, Cause of Breakdowns, Points to Remember. 

MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BmdWiy, New Yirk 



r\N. 



ALL SOLD OUT! 

We are glad to announce we have sold all of the F. N. Big Four 
Motorcycles we contracted for the 1909 season, but sorry to say that 
on account of the enormous demand in Europe we are unable to get any 
more. Please don't send us any orders therefor, for we will onlv have 
to return them with thanks and regrets. We'll soon be ready to 
talk 1 910 to ydu. 

OYIMOTOM MOTOR OO., 2232 Bromdwmy, §§mw York 



F.N 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



35 



r 










ONCE AN M. M„, ALWAYS SO 

The Key to Success for any agent is to have his 
riders keep riding and keep enthusiastic over their 
machines. This they will not do unless you sell them 
an easy riding machine. 

THE M. M. MACHINE 

is positively the easiest riding Motorcycle ever pro- 
duced in this country, or any other country, and M. M. 
riders stick to M. M. Machines. 

Isn't it about time you realized the fact? 
Get Our Agency Proposition To-day 



AMERICAN MOTOR COMPANY BR S££ ON 

DISTRIBUTING STORES: 

American Motor Company - - 218 Clarendon St. - - Boston, Mass. 

Geo. P. Jenkins - - - - 10 W. 60th St. - - New York City. 

L. E. French 895 Main St. ... Buffalo, N. Y. 

G. M. Greene - Mgr. Am. Motor Co., 1536 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

American Motor Co. of Texas - - M. M. Building - Dallas, Tex. 

Lincoln Holland - 1034 So. Main St. - Los Angeles, Cal. 

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36 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



Page. 

• • 34 



A Page 

Aurora Automatic Machinery Co 2542 

American Motor Co 35 

American Belting & Tanning Co 48 

American Motorcycle Co 52 

B 

Bosch Magneto Co Cover IV 

Badger Brass Mfg. Co 47 

Breeze Carbureter Co 5 * 



Corbin Screw Corporation 37 

Consolidated Mfg. Co 33 



Empire Tire Co 48 

Excelsior Supply Co 23 

Eclipse Machine Co 43 

Emblem Mfg. Co 38 



F. A. M. 



G & J Tire Co 26, 27, 5a 

Grossman Co., Emil 34 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 46 

Goodrich Co.. B. F Cover III 



H 



Page. 



Harlcy-Davidson Motor Co 31 

Hcndee Manufacturing Co.... Front Cover 

Hornccker Motor Mfg. Co 52 

Hansen Mfg. Co., O. C 51 

Herring-Curtiss Co 43 



Jeffrey & Dewitt 48 

Jones Speedometer Co 48 

Jenkins, Geo. P 52 

K 

Keller & Risque Motor Co 48 

Kokomo Rubber Co 39 

Karl & Co., Adolf 51 



Lyons Motor Co., Geo. V 52 

M 

Morgan & Wright 44 

Minneapolis Motorcycle Co 42 

Mcrkel-Light Motor Co 29 

Mesinger Mfg. Co.. H. & F 46 

McLaughlin & Ashley 52 

Morrison-Ricker Mfg. Co .• 51 

Motorcycle Equipment Co 51 

Mart, The 34 

N 

New Departure Mfg. Co 40 

N. S. U. Motor Co 44-52 

New Era Gas Engine Co 41 



Ovington Motor Co. 



Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory 49 

Persons Mfg. Co 36 

Prospect Motor Co 52 

PrestOLite Co 46 

Pittsfield Spark Coil Co 45 



Reading Standard Co Cover II 

Rose Mfg. Co so 

Reliance Motor Cycle Co 45 



Splitdorf, C. F 49 

Shaw Mfg. Co 51 

Standard Thermometer Co 49 



Tingley & Co., Chas. 52 

Thiem Mfg. Co 52 

Tiger Cycle Works Co 52 



Veeder Mfg. Co 50 

w 

Whipple, I. H 34 

Widmayer Co., F. B 51 



THE PERSONS 

CHAMPION 
MOTOR SEAT 

represents the nearest approach to per- 
fection in motorcycle saddles that it has 
been possible for man to attain. 




Persons CHAMP! ON MotorSkt 

Length 13- WIDTH \Zk Divided through- 
out to Straddle Frame. Patent Compound Springs j 
flo Ruction. Side Sway or Squeaking, imitation* 



It is the result of by far the longest experience and it embodies the best skill, the best 
material, the best workmanship it is possible to procure. 

Yqu will find it on all motorcycles, or by specifying it you can obtain it from any 
motorcycle manufacturer who places quality above the dollar sign. 



THE PERSONS MANUFACTURING CO. 

WORCESTER. MASS. 

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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



37 



YOUR SAFETY IS ASSURED 



IF YOUR MACHINE, ALL THINGS 

ELSE BEING EQUAL, IS FITTED 

WITH A CORBIN BRAKE 



DOUBLE THE BRAKING 

SURFACE 
OF ANY OTHER MODEL 



DURABLE, SIMPLE AND POSITIVE, THE 

CORBIN SPELLS RELIABILITY 



MAKE YOUR 
MOTORCVCU 
UP-TO-DATE 



<.u 




Mm 

M0Dn9Awd 
fffl SECURE 



FOR EITHER CHAIN OR BELT 



COMPLETE CATALOGUE ON REQUEST 



OUR MODEL 9 A IS MADE 

FOR A 
2% INCH CHAIN LINE 



WE ARE LICENSED COASTER 
BRAKE MANUFACTURERS 



WE MAKE THEM AT NEW BRITAIN, CONN., 
AND SELL THEM EVERYWHERE 



Corbin Screw Corporation 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



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38 MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED August 15, 1909. 



29 Days A Motorcyclist 

EMBLEM RIDER MAKES GOOD IN 

F. A. M. National Endurance Run 

Mr. Heil secured a Perfect Score on a machine that 
had been finished only the Sunday before, and had not 
been tried out before. There's dependability for you. 




$175f J* >/ik X\ $200* 



The performance of the EMBLEM in this run proved conclusively that 
this machine has the strength to get there with the best of them. One 
of our Trade Riders had a Perfect Score, and the other lost only 15 
points, because of his having to ride on a flat tire for several miles. 

NONE OF THE EMBLEM RIDERS 

had ever been in any contest before. Though new men, riding machines 
which had not had even a motor test, they demonstrated the reliability of 
the EMBLEM on the road. 

Write for our catalogue and our Agency proposition 

Emblem Manufacturing Company, ai n? y 1 ^' 



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Alglst 15, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 39 



K0K0M0 




THE TIRE THAT WILL 
STAND PUNISHMENT 



COME, TRY OUR 
GRIDIRON TREAD 




CATALOGUE "A" ON REQUEST 
VERY INTERESTING 

Kokomo Rubber Co. 
kokomo, ind. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August IS, 1909. 




Coaster 
Brakes 



Designed and made by men who have for 
nine years produced 'what is best for a 
Motorcycle and the Motorcyclist. This 
brake is always ready to perform the 
work. The brake you can depend upon 
when danger ahead presents itself. That's 
why so many leading Motorcycle Makers 
have adopted it, and why thousands of 
riders demand and use it. 


na4* 



AURORA AUTOMATIC MACHINERY CO. 

LICENSED COASTER BRAKE MANUFACTURERS 

1307 MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO 



MINNEAPOLIS TWO-SPEED 1A/IINS 




Paul Kottlowski on his six horse Minneapolis winning the Indiana Motorcycle Club Handicap at Indianapolis 

August 14 

Like a flash, yet as slow as you please WE LEAD WHERE OTHERS CANNOT FOLLOW 

MINNEAPOLIS MOTORCYCLE CO., Inc., uimSS&ouSmin 

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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



43 



Diamond Medal, 1907 
Perfect Score, 1907-— Perfect Score, 1908—-Perfect Score, 1909 

THE CURTISS ?^ T FA,LS 

THE HIGHEST AWARD 



WE CAN TELL YOU 




all Curtiss engines develop more 
power and speed for the same 
cubic capacity than any other en- 
gines in the world. 



1 



Roller Bearings are better than bronze, 
the Curtiss "V" Belt Transmission, with 6 

years of experience behind it, is the best 

in the world, 
the Curtiss Frame and Fork Construction 

has proven superior to all other types. 



Write for Catalog C, describing the famous "World's Record" Motorcycles. Most complete line ever offered. 
One to three cylinders; three to ten horsepower. Sidecars, Delivery Vans, etc. Some good territory still open. 
Write to-day. 

THE HERRING-CURTISS COMPANY 

HAMMONDSPORT, N. Y. 

Successors to The G. H. Curtiss Mfg. Co. 

New York Distributors, " Curtiss Motorcycle Co./ 9 1203 Bedford Avenue. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pacific Coast Distributor, G. A. Faulkner, 351 Twelfth Street, Oakland, Cat. 



Puts All Others in the Shade 



THE brake for novice or 
expert— for everybody. 

The Eclipse 1909 

Only Eight Parts, none 
of which is easily broken 
or put out of adjustment. 




The FIRST Coaster 
Brake designed for motor- 
cycle use. 

Coaster Brake 

The 1909 model has the 
largest braking surface 
ever used. 



SIMPLE, STRONG, EFFICIENT 

These qualities are most in demand in a Coaster Brake. Where any one 
is lacking, perfect service is impossible. We have been manufacturing 
Coaster Brakes for many years. You get the benefit of our experience. 

Write to us for particulars. 

ECLIPSE MACHINE COMPANY, Elmira, New York 

Licensed Coaster Brake Manufacturers 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 




IS ALWAYS THERE 



™ 1,024 MILES IN 6 DAYS 

without adjustment or repair of any kind 
is a performance which few motorcycles 
can offer for your consideration. It mu& 
be of further interest for you to know 
that the above performance was made 
by a private owner who had just pur- 
chased his mount, 

A4H.P. MODEL DE LUXE 

THE WORLD'S BEST 

The N. S. U.s are always ready for 
the mosl strenuous trip. They need no 
tuning up and no petty adjustments or 
annoyances follow you on your • journey 
no matter how strenuous. 

Write us for catalogue "M," also in regard 
to our F. A. M. and Touring Models. We 
hare the most extensire line of motorcycles in 
America. 

N. S. U. MOTOR COMPANY, 206 W. 76th Street, New York City 




4 H. P. MODEL DE LUXE. 



When choosing your tires, remember thit 

Morgan & Wright Motorcycle Ti 

in just one year from their first appearance on the market have gained a reputation, 
this country over, for superior wearing qualities and general service satisfaction 
that cannot be denied. 

Figure it any way you wish, you must finally concede that such a result could 
only have been attained by some superior merit of the tires — a freedom from trouble, 
a length of service that appealed to their users as something far better than anything 
that had gone before. 

And that is true. 

Morgan & Wright tires have satisfied their users always and everywhere, 
many times actually surprising them by the extra long service they give, and are now 
enjoying the popularity and large sale they deserve. 

MORGAN & WRIGHT, Detroit 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



45 



REUAINGE 



IT'S SPLENDID 
'ENDURANCE RUN RECORD 



RELIANCE by name and by 
nature. In the great F. 
A. M. Endurance Run five 
Reliance machines were entered 
and four of them made the fol- 
lowing scores: C. K. Ball, 986; 
Frank Walling, 982; Sanford 
Davidson, 949, and C. R. Bailey, 
952. Pretty good, isn't it? At 
Columbus, the end of the first 
day's run, every Reliance ma- 
chine came in ahead of schedule 
time. The fifth machine was 
taken out of the race account of 
the physical disability of the 
rider, the machine itself being 
in perfect condition at the time. 

Remember, above all other 
things, that these men had never 
had any experience whatever in 
contests of this sort, yet each 
one of the four won a silver 
medal. 

These are not special ma- 
chines. Every agent or rider 
who buys a Reliance gets just 
the above kind of machine. 

It has many special features, 
many fine points. Send for our 
literature. 




R£MAINGE MOTOR GYGLE GOMPANY, OWGGO, IN. Y. 



1910 



I 






s 




r 



1910 



SPARK COILS, SPARK PLUGS, SWITCHES, TIMERS 

AND DISTRIBUTERS AND MAGNETOS 

MADE IN AMERICA HAVE NO SUPERIOR IN THE MARKET 




Motorcyclists : 



You cannot afford to use inferior goods 
—therm form get Pitts field Ignition-' 




No matter what make motorcycle you use. It is the 
spark that does the business, therefore use Pittsfield Ig- 
nition. Remember that our coils are the most efficient, 
giving you the hottest, (attest spark possible and shoots it 
where it will give the best results every time. We have 
coils for any number of cylinders required — we make 
either flat or torpedo heads. The Pittsfield Spark 
Plug is the Best Made. The mica insulation will 

not crack, it being so perfectly made that the mica is virtually solid electrodes; are so prepared that 
they afford the greatest resistance to the high tension current. No matter whether it is for motorcycles, 
cars, boats or aeroplanes— insist on having the best, which is the Pittsfield System. 
Write for Particular*, Catalogue; Price List*, Etc, 

PITTSFIELD SPARK COIL CO., Dalton, Mass. 

Sales Representatives: New England, W. J. ConnelJ, 36 Columbus Avenue, Boston. Atlantic States, Thomas J. Wetzel. 17 West ' 
42nd Street, New York. Central States, K. Franklin Peterson, H. V. Greenwood, J66 Lake Street, Chicago. Michigan, 
L. D. Bolton, 319 Hammond Building, Detroit. Pacific Coast, The Laugenour Co., San Francisco. 



Magneto Spark Plu£ 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 



L's Curtain Draws Aside 
When Touched 




A good, dependable lighting system is worth more 
than all the accident insurance you could buy. 

Feeble oil lamps and treacherous gas generators invito 
accident, danger and expense, and are a nuisance to 
operate. 

Most experienced automobilists have discarded all 
other equipment and adopted Prest-O-Lite. Motor- 
cyclists are doing likewise. 

With Prest-O-Lite there is no uncertainty, no tinker- 
ing, no dirty work. The flame is always steady— 
doesn't flare up nor die down. Turned on and off like 
a gas jet. 

In automobile service, Frest-O-Lite has proven that 



it costs little if anything more than portable generating 
systems. 

The Prest-O-Lite Motorcycle Gas Tank is 12 in. long 
and 4 in, diameter. Weighs 7 pounds. Holds 10 ft. of 
gas — 40 hours of light. 



PRICE $10 

Thirty-day trial plan. 

The Prest-O-Lite Co., 



FULL TANK 75c 

(In Exchange for Empty) 

See your dealer, or write us. 



246 E. South St.. 
Indianapolis. Ind. 



Branches at New York, Boston, 
and Cleveland. 



Philadelphia, San Francisco 
3,000 Exchange Agents 



Has Ridden Over 4,000 Miles on 
These Tires Tread Not Worn 

See What a Perfect Tire This Is The Toughest, Yet the Easiest Riding 

A. L. Olds of Toledo, Ohio, writes this about his 

experience with Goodyear Tires: 

"About two years ago I got a pair of your 2Y2 x 28 

inch Motorcycle Tires for my demonstrating Wagner 

tandem, and I am pleased to say that these are still on 

the machine after covering 4,000 miles over all kinds 

of roads, with two persons the greater part of the time, 

and often a total weight of over 550 pounds. 
"These tires are now in better shape than many 

which I have seen which have not been used two weeks, 

and covered not more than 400 miles, with a single 

rider. 
"The corrugations are not quite worn out of the 

middle of the tread, and there is not a cut, scratch or 

bruise in the casings, although I have run over newly 

crushed stone roads for miles, and have encountered 

all the usual objects in 
the city streets, such as 
broken glass, tin and cin- 
ders, but fortunately I 
have had no punctures." 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY, Mott Street, Akron, Ohio 

Rv»* n/*li«»« • Atlanta. 90 North Pryor St.; Boston, 600 Boylnton St.; Chicago. 82-84 Michigan Ave.; 
Drantnci. Buffalo, 719 Main St.; Cincinnati, 317 E. Fifth St.; Cleveland. 2006 Euclid Ave.; Denver, 
28 W. Colfax Ave.; Detroit, 251 Jefferson Ave.; Los Angeles, 940 51 St. Main St.; New York City, 64th St. 
and Broadway; Philadelphia, Broad and Falrmount Ave*.; i'ittsburg. 5988 Center Ave.; 8an Francisco, 606 
Golden Gate Ave.; St. Louis, 3935-37 Olive St.; Washington, 1026 Connecticut Ave. 

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The Goodyear is really the lowest priced tire. It will outwear 
several pairs of ordinary tires, because the cover stock is made of 
toughened rubber, built for the extreme of wear, yet still retaining 
its resiliency. This is strengthened by the casing — moulded type — 
which lias four plies of the most durable, most closely woven fabric 
known. This is the famous Sea Island fabric, which costs 55c a 
yard. We could use common muslin at sJ4c a yard. But it requires 
300 pounds to break this fabric, while common muslin breaks at 
40 to 60 pounds. Hence it w ouldn't do for 

00DJ5YEAR *<™«™* 

The construction of this Sea Island fabric is such that if a 
Goodyear Tire is cut or jagced by sharp stones or other obstacles it 
can be repaired easily. The fabric being so closely woven it does 
not separate. And Goodyear Motorcycle Tires can be permanently 
repaired. 

The tube is of the same stock we use in our famous Red Seal 
Automobile Tubes. Butt end or endless type. 

The only rubber used in Goodyear Tires is the finest of new Para, 
quoted at $1.50 a pound to-day. We could use "Borneo" or 
"Guayule" at 35 cents a pound, or even "reclaimed" rubber from the 
junk pile at 10 cents a pound. But this wouldn't do for a Goodyear 
any more than common muslin. With all their strength and dura- 
bility Goodyear Clincher Motorcycle Tires are the most resilient, 
easiest riding. We can furnish them in either single or double 
clinch. Write for sample section. Get our special agency proposition. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



47 




SPARK PLUGS 



Of the sheath type, are 
specially constructed for 
Motorcycle work — they spark 
under all conditions and re- 
quire less battery power than 
any other plug. 

One turn of the wheel and 
your motor is in motion — 
not necessary to run your 
legs off. Never necessary to 
remove to clean as their 
unique construction prevents 
the accumulatibn of soot or 
carbon on the sparking point. 

Reliance Plugs will "Spark 
in Water" — that means that 
they cannot foul or short- 
circuit under any conditions. 
Soot, carbon or dampness 
has no effect. 

This plug assures you of 
longer life to itself — to your 
battery, to your coil and to 
a less strain on your mag- 
neto, at the same time giving 
a better spark and finer 
service than any other plug. 

Acknowledged everywhere 
as mechanically correct — rec- 
ords of their use prove their 
superiority and you have 
never enjoyed perfect ignition 
until you have tried Reliance 
Spark Plugs. 

Mica and porcelain backs 
.in all sizes. 

JEFFERY DEWITT COMPANY 

230 HIGH ST., REWARK. H. 7. 

S. & F. Stephenson, Agents for United Kingdom; 
19 Canning PI., Liverpool. Eng. 

Armand Frey & Co., Agents for Continental Europe; 
Berlin, Germany. 



Solar 
Lamps 

live up to their reputation. 
Their good name is the result 
of twelve years of successful 
lamp building. If you want the 
very best there is, the one lamp 
that will make night riding posi- 
tively safe, then get a Solar. 
To insure a steady flow of gas 
you need a Solar Generator also. 

THE BADGER BRASS MFG. 
COMPANY 

Two Factories 

KENOSHA, WIS. 

437 Eleventh Ave., NEW YORK 




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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 









) 










til 








~"^*5 






^ 








j 










•■ jB 


9r \kSk 

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f 










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p 



"Tourist" Single & "Tourist" Two-Speed 

MOTORCYCLES 

We are now ready to close a Limited Number of 
Agencies and Delivery Contracts for the TOURIST 
MOTORCYCLE. 

Every machine put out with an absolute guarantee, and 
as output will be limited, we will appoint only such agents 
as we can take care of, and no more. 

Wish to hear from parties interested in an agency for a 
motorcycle that appeals to the discriminating buyer. 



KELLER «, RISQUE MOTOR CO., 



We are now booking orders for the attaching of 
"K 6c R" Two-Speed Hubs, this winter when your 
machine is not in use. Are you on our mailing list ? 

- ST. PAUL, MINN. 



YOU 
NEED A 



JONES SPEEDOMETER 



Whether you ride in an endur- 
ance content or whether you 
never leave the streets of your 
own city. Speed laws are 
stririt — more so now than ever 
before. The Jones is accepted 
in Court as undisputable testi- 
mony in cases of arreft for 
speeding. In riding to a sched- 
ule you simply have got to have 
a JONES. The new Jones 
Model 32 is the most complete 
and accurate motorcycle speed- 
ometer made. 



MAXIMUM 
SPEED HAND 



SEASON ODOMETER 
TRIP ODOMETER 



JONES SPEEDOMETER DEFT, 
UNITED MANUFACTURERS, Inc. 

Broadway and 76th St. 
NEW YORK 




INSTANTANEOUS ESET 



MODEL 32 :: PRICE $25.00 



BEAVER WATERPROOF LEATHER BELTING 

THE IDEAL MOTORCYCLE BELT 

BEAVER Belting is tanned by a secret process, making an absolutely insoluble leather 
of great tensile strength. Is not affected by climatic conditions and resists the action of 
water, oil and the fumes of gases. Will transmit more power, stretch less, wear longer, 
and is the only belt on the market that will not slip when wet. 

In writing for prices specify dimensions and description of Belt required. 

American Belting & Tanning Co. wSsSSSm^ 242 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



49 



flmfl 

rEAfi* ,1m. MAI 



New York — 148 Chambers bt. 
AG£/VC/£5. 
Atlanta, Ga., Dunham Rubber Co.; Atlantic City, N J, Fenn Auto Supply Co.; Boise ™^ ^*\?!*£J^ $£* j^i* 



You wouldn't be without a 

SPLITDORF 
Motorcycle Plug 



WILL OUTLAST YOUR MOTOR 



IMMf M -.»** 



««ricTi,» qaVTiQmT 



one day if you knew 
the satisfaction it gives 
to other motorcyclists 

This Plug is designed 
mm especially to meet con- 
ditions that exist only 
in motorcycle engines, 
and its wide adoption 
by the leading makers 
and riders is a pretty 
safe indication of its 
merit 

MweiyNrfl«taiiyNriat ride aid Mk the perf ed gifti 

C. F. SPUTDORF 




PFANSTIEHL COILS 

FOR MOTORCYCLES 




Walton Ave. and 138th St. 

Branch, 1679 Broadway 




New York 



ARE 

Guaranteed Absolutely 
for 5 Years 

Our patented system o! Pancake winding explains 
this, and also the wonderful efficiency o! all Pfanstiehl 
Coils. 

Three reasons for our great popularity: 

INDESTRUCTIBILITY 

RELIABILITY 

PRICE 



Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory 

NORTH CHICAGO, ILL. 



STANDARD SPEEDOMETER 
Price $15.00 



The STANDARD 

MOTORCYCLE SPEEDOMETER 

Ii used by the Police of various cities because 
it is accurate and can be depended upon at all 
times. 

To be safe you should have one on your 
machine, to that you can, at a glance, know your 
exact speed. Beside this you can see the miles 
being rolled off, on the odometer. 

Strong Cast Fittings for 
Every Make of Machine, 

STANDARD THERMOMETER COMPANY 

65 Shirley Street, - - - BOSTON 




SPEEDOMETER -ODOMETER 
Price $20.00 



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50 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15, 1909. 




MOTORCYCLE OIL LAMP 

Showing a Red Rear Light 

A combination of headlight and tail light 

in one lamp. 
The Neverout burns kerosene oil 16 hours 
with one filling and will stay lighted under 
any and all conditions. 

All riveted — will not rattle apart over 
the roughest roads. 

Sold on ten days* trial. Price $300 
complete. 

The Neverout is 
equipped with a 
patent glass- cov- 
ered reflector, 
made of pure Ger- 
man silver; in- 
stantly removable; 
never loses its 
original brilliancy. 
Guaranteed to stay 
lighted or money 
refunded. 

Made in gun 
metal, brass and 
nickel finish. 

The only perfect 
and reliable motor- 
cycle lamp made. 

If your dealer 
cannot supply you, 
write us direct. 

Dealers: Write 
at once for our 
proposition. 




The Neverout Motorcycle Lamp, with 
combination tail light, showing rear view. 
(Patented.) 



ROSE MANUFACTURING CO. 



933 Arch Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 




motorcycle: gas lamp 

And Independent Gas Generatoi 

(Patent Air Cooling System) 





Just What Yoa Hi?« B««n Loofcintf For 

The most powerful motorcycle lighting apparatus made. 
Mirror Lense Reflector. 

SATISFACTOIT 01 MOUSY IACE 
All First Class Dealers. Write For Literature. 

ROSE MANUFACTURING COMPANT 
Main Office, 933 Arth St. PHILAOELPBIA* PA. 



Motorcycle Trip Cyclometers 



Made specially 
for Motorcycles. 
Made larger and 
stronger to with- 
stand the rough 
usage to which ' 
it is subjected to 
on the Motor- 
cycle. 

Fully 
Guaranteed. 



Supplied for 26" 
or 28" wheels. 




With the new 
adjustable 
bracket (which 
is regularly sup- 
plied) The Vee- 
der Motorcycle 
Trip Cyclometer 
can be attached 
to all makes o! 
Motorcycles. 

Price $3.00 

complete with 
Motorcycle 
Striker. 



THE VEEDER MFG. CO., 

42 Sargeant St., - Hartford, Conn. 

Makers of Odometers, Cyclometers, Counters, Tacho- 
meters, Tachodometer* and fine castings. 



COMFORT AND ENDURANCE 

ABE TWO OF THE QUALITIES WHICH 
HAVE SO WONDERFULLY POPULARIZED 

MESINGER MOTORCYCLE SADDLES 

That is why most of the Two, Three and Four Cyl- 
inder Machines are equipped with Mesinger Cavalry 
Type Motor Saddles. They have the Right Shape for 
Comfort and have Fibre Friction Shock Absorbers. 

The Mesinger Cavalry Saddle is made like a horse 
saddle — it prevents you from slipping and avoids that 
crampish hold of the hands on the handle-bar. 




"CAVALRY" No. 3. . > 

(PATENTED.) 

Whether for Touring Purposes or 
merely riding in the vicinity of your 
home, The Mesinger saddle always satisfies. It is honest 
value. It is the result of many years' experience in the 
manufacture of motorcycle saddles. 

H. 6 F. MESINGER MFG. COMPANY 

1801-1803 First Avenue, - - New York 



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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



51 




Uju 



Grinnell Auto Gloves 

are made of "Reindeere" and Coltskin 
- the softest and most serviceable of 
fllove leathers. They are 

VENTILATED 

by rows of liny holes across the back, 
loo small to admit dust. The gauntlet is 
kept from sagftinfi by the patented 

"RIST-FIT" 

— a "V of soft leather set into the cuff, which allows a 
nujf , comfortable tit at the wrist. 

ITTEMTIOM, DEALERS s No other Auto Glove is made so 
well or possesses the superior features of the Giinnelt 
Glove. No glove is so widely known. Your customers 
want them. If you are not handling them, write us for 
prices and terms. 

MORFISON-RICKER MFG. CO. 

27 Broad St., Grinnell, Iowa 

Originators and Patentees of 
Ventilated" and "RUt-Fit" Glove* 



\ 



GUARANTEED 
MOTORCYCLE 
ACCESSORIES 



Our stock is the largest in America, We have all the 
old standbys and 100 new ones you should know 
about. Send to-day for our money saving 36 page 
catalog and free copy ol a new magazine. 

MOTORCYCLE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, Hammondsport, N. Y. 




LET THE MOTOR DO THE WORK 

A MOTORCYCLE can be made quickly FROM ANY BICYCLE by 
using our 2 H. P. Motor Outfit. Unequalled for POWEE, SPEED 
and RELIABILITY. Anyone can eaully attach our Outfit by follow- 
ing the directions we send wttb each Attachment. Best material and 
workmanship. 



FULLY 
GUARANTEED. 

Immediate d e- 
llrery. Send for 
Catalog B. 



Shaw Mlg. (o. 

Galesburg, Kansas 




MAIL THIS TO-DAY 

FRED. WILLIS, 

President F. A. M. t 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Dear Sir: I feel that I ought to be a member of the 
F. A. M. We must have a national organization to 
promote motorcycling and to guard and care for its 
many interests. Please send me particulars. 

(Signed) 

State 

City 

Street 



INDIAN 

AND 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON 
MOTORCYCLES 

PARTS, SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS 

Send for Largest Motorcycle Accessory Catalogue Ever Issued 

Great Bargains in Second-Hand MOTORCYCLES 

$50 up Twins $150 up 
F. B. WIDMAYER CO. 

2312 Broadway NEW YORK 




HANSEN'S 

AUTO and DRIVING 

GLOVES 



\ 



Perfect 
fitting, 

wonderfully soft and pliable 
and wear like iron. 
Write today for hand- 
some descriptive price- 
list and circular. 

C. HANSEN MFG. CO. 

337 East Water Street 
MILWAUKEE 



Tire Troubles? 

USE PERMANIT 




For particulars write or send 
53 cents for a sample carton 
which is sufficient for a bicycle 
tire. 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 

Guarantee Policy furnished to every 

user of "PERMANIT," 

The Adolf Karl Co. 

(Inc.) 

243 Washington Street 

NEWARK, N. J. 




- f 
One-hnH Actual iize 



The Baby "Breeze" 

CARBURETER 

For Motorcycles, made of 
polished aluminum, small parts 
of brass, weighs fourteen 
ounces; small in size, big in re- 
sults; price ten dollars. Dur- 
able, light and strong — a hand- 
ful only — special connections for 
popular machines included in 
price; 8o to 95 miles per gallon 
under normal road conditions. 
Write for special literature. 
Send ten cents for our Engine 
Trouble Text-book. 

Breeze Carbureter Company 

266 Halaey St. > f , Newark, N. J. 



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52 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



August 15. 1909. 



Order your molorcycle equipped with 

G & J ROUGH-RIDER GRIPS 

Mode ol Rubber. They relieve Ihe vibration. 
Price, $1.50 Per Pair 

For Sale by All Dealers. 

G & J TIRE CO. 

INDIANAPOLIS 



McLaughlin & Ashley 

206 W. 76th St.. New York. 
N. S. U. MOTORCYCLES 

U Immediate delivery in all new models. 

? Bargains in 2nd hand machines. 
Supplies and accessories at prices that 
are right. Repairs promptly and effect- 
ively made. Storage. 




C. O. T. Gum-Gum. Ask your dealer how nicely it 

repair* digouts in your auto shoe. For sale by jobbers. 

CH*S. <». T1NCLEY & CO., Rahwav. ft. .1, 



THE MINERVA TWIN, 

with Bosch Maine to. Spring Forks. Double 
Grip Control and Continental Non-Skid Tires, 
Is the best lor the money on the market to-day 



5 H. P. 
8 H. P. 



nplete $300.00 
K 325.00 



GEO. V. LYONS MOTOR CO., 

Broadway, near 87th St.. New York City 



The British Motor Cycle 

NEWSPAPER 

American subscription rate, 12.50 per annum 
"The Motor Cycle," 20 Tudor St., London E.C. 



Motorcycles in Stock 

3b //. P. Single Cylinders 

With Bosch Magneto, $225 

7 H. P. Twin Cylinders 

New York Headquarters. 8 W. 60th St. 




IMPROVED Belt Hook. Detachable roller link 

and self-locking screw. Price 25 cents. 
PROSPECT M8T8R C8MPANY, 1988 Bnrtway, N. Y. 



TORPEDO MOTORCYCLES 

WHY HESITATB? Unless you ride 
the BEST you cannot be a SATISFIED 
MOTORCYCLIST. You know there can 
be but one BEST and that is the TOR- 
PEDO. Write for catalog and agent's terms. 

The Hornecker Motor Mfg. Co. 
. Geneseo. 111., U.S. A. 



-THIEM 1909- 



If you or your friends or your friends' friends are in- 
terested in the latest and best improved Motorcycles, 
regardless of how highly you regard other makes — do 
not purchase a Motorcycle until you have written us 
for Our Latest Catalogue describing in detail, all 
about Our New and Original Models. Best Agent 
Proportion to Date. 

THIEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
Box 498, Minneapolis, Minn. 



w 



American X Agcncy=$ 

We have the best money- 
making Agency Proposition 
yet. We give a discount that 
will make you money. Write 
today. 

American Motorcycle Co. 

Wells a«d Seftitler 8U., Cfcl«a««, III. 



ROYAL PIONEER MOTORCYCLES 

1910 models now ready for delivery. 
Finest stock of parts for all makes of ma- 
chines and all kinds of sundries in Greater 
New York. Give ns a trial and be satisfied. 

TIGER CYCLE WORKS CO. 

782 8th Ave., New York City 

F. A. M. OFFICIAL REPAIR SHOP 



ADVERTISE IN THE MART. 

2 CENTS A WORD 

IT SELLS THE STUFF 



NEW EDITION- JUST OUT 

" CONSTRUCTION, MANAGEMENT 
AND CARE OF MOTORCYCLES" 

Revised and Enlarged— 60 Paces. 25 Cents 

MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING C-\ 
299 Broadway • • Now York 



SHAMROCK 
GLORIA 

Tie (My Perfect Hitter Bet n the Market 

it carried an N. S. U. # 4 h.p., motor- 
cycle through the A. C. U. trials. 1.024 
miles in 6 days, to victory and gold medals 

It gave no trouble 

It allowed no stretch 

It transmitted every ounce 
of power given 

Insist on S. G. 

You'll never regret it 

N. S. U. BELT LINK 




Like others in looks alone, but not 
equalled in workmanship, material or 
wearing quality 

The original sent by mail, X in., 30c. 
All other sizes, 40c. 

N. S. U. Motor Company 

206 West 76th Street. New YerX City 



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OTORCYCL 



ILLUSTRATED 



^ 



3=±3= 



Vol. IV. No. 17 




Sept 



PUBLISHED BY THE MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



GOERKE AND O'BRIEN DIVIDE HONORS 

Winners in Eight of the Twelve Events of Race Meet Conducted at Olympic Park Under the Auspices of 

the New Jersey Club Last Saturday Afternoon. 



WALTER GOERKE, of Brooklyn, and Howard O'Brien, 
of Newark, divided the major portion of the honors 
of the meet conducted by the New Jersey Club at Olympic 
Park last Saturday afternoon. For a comparatively young 
organization, the program, with no less than twelve well- 
selected events, was a very pretentious one, and it was, gen- 
erally speaking, finely carried out. There were times when 
the officials showed their lack of experience, though it was 
seldom that the audience — a large one — was made aware of 
the fact. Simply stated, the Jersey club proved its right to 
be known as one of the best officered and most enterprising 
organizations in the country- It is safe to predict great things 
and a huge membership for this aggregation of genuine and 
genteel enthusiasts. 

The Olympic Park track, on the outskirts of Newark, is 
two laps to the mile, with dirt roadbed. The track was in 
good condition Saturday, hard and smooth, and quite fast 
on the stretches. It was impossible, however, to do any- 
thing at all remarkable on the turns, quite sharp and as 
flat as the proverbial pancake. Still, while the old- records, 
except those for that particular track, were not damaged 
any, the sport was good throughout, and the meet an un- 
qualified success, sufficiently so, in fact, to justify the hope 
that the Jersey boys will conduct another before the close 
of the season. 

Of the twelve races, Goerke won four and O'Brien three. 
The one mile open, for novices, was captured by Arthur C. 
Brown ; the two mile match race, between O'Brien and Percy 
Drummond, by the latter, who also won the five-mile club 
championship. Goerke made best time in the one-mile trials. 
while George Richey, of Newark, corralled first honors in 
the five-mile handicap. 

One of the features of the meet was the racing debut of 
Albert H. Bartsch, of the N. S. U. Motor Company. Bartsch's 
first race was the three-mile open, and he proved his merit 
at once, riding a close second to Goerke in one of the pret- 
tiest contests of the afternoon. Unfortunately, Bartsch suf- 
fered a spill in the two-mile Essex county championship 
and, while not seriously injured, was so badly shaken up 
as to compel his withdrawing for the balance of the day. 
Bartsch was leading when Watson Kluszek, a former bicycle 
racer, attempted to pass him on the back stretch. Kluszek 
struck the front wheel of the N. S. U. machine, throwing 
its rider, who escaped serious hurts only by great presence 
of mind, rolling over and over on the track, and getting 
away with a few cuts and a bruise or two. Later in the 
day, George Hamilton fell during the five-mile open, 
wrenching his shoulder and being rendered unconscious for a 
few moments. 

Two championships went to O'Brien. These were the two- 



mile Essex county title and the five-mile New Jersey Club 
championship. His other victory was in the fifteen-mile 
Marathon. There were laurels for several others at the 
meet and the driving of the amateurs was highly creditable. 
Drummond was a dual winner, one of his victories being 
over O'Brien in a special match race of two miles. This 
event called for strictly stock machines, and mounted on 
regular five horse Indians just as they came off the floor of 
a salesroom. Drummond proved the victor. Starting on the 
outside of the course, Drummond took a quick jump for- 
ward, got in ahead of O'Brien on the pole, taking the first 
turn, and was never headed. Drummond drove true, took 
the curves cleverly, and from a lead of fifty yards at one 
mile he increased his advantage to seventy-five yards at the 
finish. 

Drummond also won the five-mile New Jersey club cham- 
pionship for machines of forty-one cubic inches. O'Brien 
didn't compete in this, as Drummond objected to his using 
his new racing machine. Accordingly Drummond won over 
George Hamilton and Carl Segelback, two local drivers. 
Hamilton proved a clever man by getting three seconds dur- 
ing the afternoon and that with a new machine geared for 
road driving and which he only purchased on Friday. 

The three five-mile races which closed the meet provided 
the best sport of the afternoon and brought forth the greatest 
driving. Two were handicaps and one an open race. George 
Richey, of Roseville, proved the winner of the first handicap, 
in a half wheel finish over Carl W. Bush, of Caldwell. Both 
had liberal handicaps, starting from the same mark and get- 
ting ahead of O'Brien and Goerke from scratch. Richey 
showed a better nerve on the turns, and by holding to a 
course about the center of the track went through to victory. 
Bush did his best work on the straights, always pulling up 
on Richey there, but falling back on the bends. As the 
finish was down the home stretch Bush came up jumping, 
and was only about two feet behind at the tape. O'Brien came 
in a good third. 

Goerke then took the next two races. His driving in each 
was a pretty exhibition. In both contests he fought it out 
with O'Brien, overhauling the latter at three miles in the 
first and four miles in the second. The finish in the latter 
saw about a length between them. 

SUMMARIES. 

Fifteen-Mile Marathon, open to New Jersey Motorcycle 
Club members. Won by Howard O'Brien, Newark, 5 Indian ; 
George Hamilton, Brookdale, 5 Indian, second. Time, 
21 m. 46s. 

Three-Mile Open Scratch Race, limit 30.50 cubic inches. 
Won by Walter Goerke. Brooklyn, 4 Indian; Al. Bartsch. 
Hackensack, 3% N. S. U., second; Watson Kluszek, West 



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AT OLYMPIC PARK AND BRIGHTON BEACH 




i.— Start of three mile open. 2.— Howard O'Brien. 3. — On the last lap of the three mile scratch race. 4.— Olym- 
pic Park Meet officials. 5. — One-hour race at Brighton. 6.— Goerke and Chappie. 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Orange, 4 Harley-Davidson, third. Time, 4m. 13 2-5S. 

Two-Mile Essex County Championship, open to New Jer- 
sey riders, limit 30.50 cubic inches. Won by Howard O'Brien, 

4 Indian; George Reichey, Newark, s l / 2 Yale, second. Time, 
3m. 12s. 

One- Mile Open Novice Race, limit 41 cubic inches. Won 
by Arthur C. Brown, Brooklyn, 5 Indian; George Hamilton, 

5 Indian, second; John E. Bender, Paterson, 5 Indian, third. 
Time, im. 27 1-5S. 

Five-Mile Motorcycle Club Championship, limit 30.50 cubic 
inches. Won by Howard OBrien, 4 Indian; George Reichey, 
Newark, Z X A Yale, second; Carl Bush, Caldwell, 3 Excelsior, 
third; time 8.01 4-5. 

One-mile open time trial, for track record, limit 41 cubic 
inches. Won by Walter Goerke, 5 Indian; time, 1:19 1-5. 
Howard O'Brien, 5 Indian, second ; time 1.22. John E. Bender, 
5 Indian, third;. Time, 1.23 4-^. 

Special Two-Mile Match Race, for strictly stock machines. 
Won by Percy Drummond, 5 Indian; Howard O'Brien, 5 



Indian, second. Time, 2.47. This was very well contested. 

Miss-and-out Race, limit 41 cubic inches. Won by Walter 
Goerke, 5 Indian; Howard O'Brien, 4 Indian, second; Percy 
Drummond, 5 Indian, third. Distance three miles. Time, 4.07. 

Five-Mile New Jersey motorcycle Club Championship, limit 
48 cubic inches. Won by Percy Drummond, 5 Indian ; George 
Hamilton, 5 Indian, second; Karl Segelbach, 5 Indian, third. 
Time, 7m. 21 4-5S. 

Five-Mile Handicap, open; limit 30.50 cubic inches. Won 
by George Reichey, z l A Yale (im. 22c); Carl Bush, 4 Ex- 
celsior (im. 22s.) second; Howard OBrien, 4 Indian, (23s.) 
third. Time, 6m. 50s. 

Five-Mile Handicap, open, limit 41 cubic inches. Won by 
Walter Goerke, 5 Indian (from scratch), Howard O'Brien, 
5 Indian (5s.), second; George Hamilton, 5 Indian (35s.), 
third. Time, 6m. 43s. 

Five-Mile Open, scratch, limit 41 cubic inches. Won by 
Walter Goerke, 5 Indian; Howard O'Brien, 5 Indian, second; 
Percy Drummond, 5 Indian, third. Time, 7m. 49s. 



STOCK-RACING MACHINE QUESTION BOTHERING THE ENGLISH TOO. 



OUR English cousins seem to be having even more 
trouble than we are "enjoying," to judge from the 
contributions and letters in the columns of our British 
contemporary, regarding standard designs in competition. 
It appears that the winners of certain hill-climbing con- 
tests, open to standard touring models, have been riding 
machines "pared down" to a limit which puts them dis- 
tinctly outside the "tourist" class — in fact, in some cases 
actually 50 pounds in weight have been saved, and the 
sportsman who entered a» genuine roadster was "out of it" 
completely. 

Yes, we have seen something like that nearer home than 
Sutton Bank. Many suggestions have been brought for- 
ward to remedy this evil, and now one of our staff pro- 
poses that all manufacturers who intend entering in com- 
petitions during any particular year should deposit ex- 
amples of their real standard machines with the F. A. M. 
competition committee, at the beginning of the season, 
any radical departure from this standard to be disqualified. 
While this plan might prevent the manufacturer from try- ' 
ing out new ideas in public competitions, it certainly would 
give every competitor an equal chance to find a place 
amongst the winners. 

For hill climbs, some riders strip off as much of their 
machines as they can without being disqualified, and fit 
light bicycle saddles, drilling holes in their mounts and 
often detaching the mudguards. Mufflers are removed, 
or holes drilled right up the exhaust pipe — in fact, every- 
thing is done to render the machine fast and, at the same 



time, remarkably uncomfortable. We have actually seen 
a tin cup soldered inside the gasoline tank under the 
filler, with the carbureter feed pipe leading direct from 
this. This cup' would be filled with gasoline, which would 
be just sufficient to take the machine up the hill, and any 
official who might unscrew the filler would think that the 
tank was full, according to regulations. The wily com- 
petitor thus saved the weight of two gallons of gasoline or 
so, which naturally would make some difference in his 
time. Again, we know of an engine with shallow valve 
chambers, the piston of this engine rising above the floor 
of the valve chamber, at the top of its stroke. Two piston 
rings were fitted, one at the top and one at the bottom, of 
a domed piston, which was actually drilled with holes be- 
tween the rings, so that the lower ring was intended only 
as a guide for the piston, as any gas getting past the top 
ring would simply filter through the holes. As the balance 
was not corrected to allow for this paring down of weight, 
the machine was a terrible one to ride, the vibration being 
excessive. 

This kind of thing has been done for years, and it is 
about time that it was stopped, both at home and abroad, 
as the results are utterly misleading to the general buying 
public. A man reads that a certain machine can climb a 
well-known "test" hill at an extraordinary speed, and buys 
one, expecting to be able to do the same. Naturally he is 
disappointed when he finds that the machine dies upon its 
merely "looking" at the hill. This is good for neither the 
manufacturer nor the sport. 



A FINE example of the utilization of the motorcycle in 
quick transportation for business purposes is afforded 
by H. Cunningham, of Beaumont, Tex., in making early 
morning runs to Port Arthur, carrying the Beaumont Enter- 
prise and making possible its early delivery to Port Arthur 
subscribers before they have well rubbed the sleep from their 
eyes or sat down to their breakfast tables to enjoy their morn- 
ing repast and mentally digest and regale themselves with the 
news and the happenings of the world through the columns 
of the Enterprise. During the past week Mr. Cunningham has 
made six trips, carrying an average of from 700 to 800 papers 
each trip, and making the run in 35 minutes. 



ACCORDING to Motor Cycle, the English publication, 
"a Pittsburg reader states that outside Chicago the 
sidecar is practically unknown in this country. Greater 
Pittsburg, with its 600,000 inhabitants, cannot boast of a 
single sidecar; in fact, the word when used always re- 
quires a lengthy explanation as to its meaning, and the 
production of an illustration of a sidecar excites consid- 
erable curiosity. This is not surprising when one takes 
into consideration that the free-wheel on pedal bicycles 
was in use and had attained the height of its popularity 
in England before anyone in France fitted it to a modern 
safety bicycle. Even now it is seldom seen in France." 



THE hour motorcycle race, which opened the automo- 
bile carnival on the Brighton Beach Motordrome 
Friday, was won by Walter Goerke, who, on an Indian, 
made 55% miles. Chappie, Robertson and Baker, all on 
Indians, were second, third and fourth, respectively, hav- 
ing traveled 54^, 51 and 50 miles. The contest developed 
fairly fast time for a track not properly banked for fast 
riding. Voelker, on an N. S. U., did some good work at 



the outset, but two falls, neither of them having any 
serious result, put him practically out of the running. 
Others who started were Fleming (Indian), Constance 
(Pierce), Webb (Indian), and Hall (N. S. U.). Goerke 
sustained two punctures and Chappie had chain troubles 
for a time. Robertson and Baker made the entire distance 
without even dismounting. The time was excellent, in view 
of the condition of the track. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



A TRIP TO THE VOLCANO KILAUEA 

A Hawaiian Rider's Experience— By Mervyn F. Strauss 




Streams of Hot Sulphur. 



The Edge of an Inferno. 



A Lake of Fire. 



THIRTY-FOUR miles from the city 
of Hilo, on the island of Hawaii, 
and rising four thousand feet above sea 
level, is the famous volcano of Kilauea. 
It is the objective point of hundreds of 
tourists each year, and is one of the great 
sights of the world. Three of us living 
in Honolulu, learning that there was to 
be an excursion to the volcano over the 
third, fourth, and fifth of July, decided 
to take advantage of it. All being en- 
thusiastic motorcyclists, nothing was 
more natural than to take our machines 
along. The ordinary mode of travel is 
to go from Honolulu to Hilo by steamer, 
from Hilo to Glenwood, the end of the 
railroad line, by train, and by stage the 
last nine miles. 

On Saturday afternoon, July third, we 
put our machines on board of the 
Mauna Kea, and left for Hilo with the 
excursion crowd at about three thirty in 
the afternoon. The writer had a light 
"07" Thor, in which had been put a 'o8 
Reading-Standard engine, while the 
other two machines were '08 and '09 
three horse power Readings. Long before dark we sighted 
Molokai, the island on which is the large Leper settlement. 
We coasted along this island for some time, finally passing 
on to Maui. Early in the evening the moon came out reveal- 
ing a picture only to be seen in these islands. We passed 
Lani and Maui, each dull and hazy in the moonlight. Most of 
us slept out on deck on mattresses, and by five in the morning 
we were all up once more, to see the coast of Hawaii appear. 
As it gradually grew lighter we could see the steep bluffs and 
green cane fields, till the sun's coming up made the crest of 
Mauna Kea pink. We passed numerous sugar mills, until, a 
little before seven, Hilo came into sight, where we landed soon 
after seven. 

We were given our directions by the Indian agent, and 
started at once on our hard up hill grind of thirty miles. For 
the first few miles the road was as good as I have seen, but 
as we proceeded it became rougher, and more like the average 
country road. We passed through Olaa, a plantation town, 
with its large sugar mill, without stopping, the grade getting 
steeper and steeper all the time. Shortly we came to long 
lanes of tree ferns and banana trees where the road is red 
dirt and the surface smooth, till we reached Puna, a Japanese 
village. 

We had no further occasion to stop until we. reached Glen- 
wood, where we found that the train with the other excur- 




One of the Lava Cones. 



sionists had just arrived. We had left an 
hour behind them and had stopped on 
the way. At Glenwood we each took a 
small quantity of gasoline, gave the 
stages about twenty minutes start, and 
resumed our ride. From Glenwood on 
the road became steadily steeper and 
rougher, but nothing troubled our good 
little machines, and we passed the 
stages in fine style. In the last two 
miles the road improved again, and we 
hit it up fast till we reached the Vol- 
cano House. Here we put our machines 
into the so-called "garage," registered, 
cleaned up, and had luncheon, as these 
were by far the most important con- 
siderations at the time. 

From the porch of the hotel the whole 
panorama of the volcano was spread 
out before us. To the right, the crest 
of Mauna Loa rose thousands of feet, 
and in the sunlight could be clearly seen 
the dark scar of a recent lava now. 
Straight in front is the crater of Kiluaea, 
about seven miles in diameter, with 
walls a thousand feet high. The floor 
of lava rises in broken, tangled heaps of black, cinderlike 
substance; it is like a giant cone rising gradually towards the 
center; that is "Halemaumau," the house of the eternal fires. 
An hour after we had arrived, the stages reached the hotel, 
and we felt that we had done pretty well in a nine-mile run, 
after giving them twenty minutes start. We then took a walk 
to the sulphur beds, which are great mounds of pure yellow 
with blowholes all over the surface. Through these holes 
come the hot smoke and gases which deposit the sulphur. 
At about three in the afternoon we started for the pit, Hale- 
maumau. Climbing down the steep trail cut in the wall we 
came to the edge of the lava flow, which is even blacker and 
more irregular than it appears from above. The trail is 
marked by lava blocks painted white, so that it is almost 
impossible for one to lose one's way. After traveling over 
the lava flow for quite a distance we came to the hot rocks, 
gaping fissures from which hot, sulphurous gases rise. As we 
proceeded, the smoke from the pit became more and more 
distinct, till we stood on the edge of the awful inferno raging 
some few hundred feet below. The lake at this time was some 
four hundred feet in diameter, and was violently active. All 
the time there were great cascades and fountains of boiling 
lava. One spot in particular, called Old Faithful, boils up 
every forty seconds. At present there are two channels or 
flumes, through which the lava seems to flow into the lake. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Occasionally it will cool for an instant, and then break out 
into thousands of bright lines like waves, then finally break 
forth again into geysers of liquid fire. It is a never-to-be-for- 
gotten scene, and is so fascinating that one can stay for hours 
gazing into the molten depths of this wonder of nature. Late 
in the evening we wandered back across the lava fields and 
climbed the steep trail with the light of the full moon to help 
us find our way.' 

The next morning, on our return to Glenwood, it com- 
menced to rain, and in a few minutes we were well soaked. 
The hard lava road was not affected, however, and as it was 
only a passing shower, we were soon dried off again. We 
stopped once or twice for pictures, and coming to Olaa again, 
we made rather a prolonged stop. The rest of the way to 
Ililo we covered in rapid time, particularly the last few 
miles, where the road is almost perfect for motorcycling; and 
we reached the town again somewhat in advance of our 
friends on the train. 

We lunched at the marvelous Hotel Demosthenes in Hilo, 
then spent the rest of the time seeing the sights of town and 
the surrounding country. On the way to the steamer we 
visited a Japanese fishing village on the Waiakea river, and 
finally went down to the ship. Shortly before the scheduled 
time for sailing our machines were hoisted aboard by way 
of the cargo boom, and we went on to clean up. The boat 
reached its destination without any further incident. 

We had no trouble of any sort on the road, with the 
exception of the stoppage of my gasoline pipe on account 
of dirt, and this speaks well for both machines and tires, as 
anyone will admit who has ever been over those roads. The 
distance may seem short, but I think it is equal to an ordinary 
run of three or four times sixty miles, when wear and tear on 
machine and rider are taken into consideration. If you don't 
believe this, come and try the trip for yourself. It is certainly 
wrtrth whili* for the scene is 
OQC uhich many would willing- 
ly walk to see, if there were no 
other way of getting there. 



SOME VALVE NOTES. 

Ill AVE already described the 
proper method of grind- 
ing valves to a gastight fit on 
their seatings, and, if we leave 
out grinding, the detail of the 
valve gear most commonly 
found imperfect on an ama- 
teur's machine is the spring. 
When I purchase a new engine 
I always order two spares of 
each valve spring; one serves 
for replacement purposes, and 




is carried in the kit wherever I go; the other serves as 
a standard for testing, and is kept on the shelf at home, 
duly labelled. The value of this procedure lies in the 
fact that the strength of all valve springs is a matter 
of compromise. For instance, in the case of an exhaust 
valve spring, we could get smarter closing of the valve 
if we used the clutch spring of a 40 h. p. automobile, 
but the resistance thrown via the tappet and camshaft 
on to the crankshaft would be truly colossal; so we 
compromise and use a medium strength spring, which 
gives a snappy closing without setting up a lot of back 
pressure when the valve has to be opened. Similarly with 
an automatic inlet. At fast engine speeds the stronger 
the spring, the better — we don't want the valve to be 
chattering on its seat; but at slow speed the piston suction 
is weak, and would only open a very strong spring rather 
late, if at all; so we use a medium spring, as the best 
compromise for fast and slow speeds, as we cannot get a 
variable spring on the standard type of valve. 

Now if we buy from a conscientious manufacturer, we 
can take it as gospel that he has worked out the very best 
general compromise in the way of spring strengths, and 
so, to save ourselves trouble, we use one of his standard 
exhaust and inlet springs to test by. Whenever we take 
out our valves, we measure the used springs against the 
unused, and see if it's time to put in a new one. If we 
are very energetic, we may try different springs of our 
own devising; but as a rule we shall only waste time, 
and will discover that our manufacturer knew his business. 
These unused testing springs will prdfnptly tell us when 
our exhaust valve spring has been "burnt out," i. e., been 
heated so far and so often that it has lost temper — a fruit- 
ful source of vanished power; and also when our delicate 

a. o. i. v. has taken a set, ano 
needs pulling out to restore 
virility. At this point I insert 
two memos: If you don't 
carry a screw spring compres- 
sor for replacing exhaust 
springs, put them into a vice, 
and bind them up in the com- 
pressed position with twine or 
wire A baby can then put 
them in place without tools, 
and a slash with the knife sets 
them to work. A "set" inlet 
valve spring can always be re- 
stored to energy by simply pull- 
ing it out, but it won't retain 
tt> proper set for long. 




Diamond Head. 



Unloading the Machines. 



A Wonderful Panorama. 



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September 1, 1909. 



THE SCOTCH RELIABILITY-A GRUELLING TEST 

BY B. H. DAVIES. 



1 RECENTLY concluded a rather lurid three weeks, di- 
vided between competing in the English Reliability 
Trial, and judging a similar event in Scotland, under the 
auspices of the Edinburgh M. C. C, I had a strenuous time 
as a competitor in the English trial, learning the weakness 
of a carbureter fitted with slide control. A big car 
chucked a clob of mud right into the guts of the vaporiser 
on the first day, and a cracked inlet pipe prevented me 
dissembling the device for cleansing purposes. As a con- 
sequence, I drove 850 miles without any carbureter con- 
trol, as the mud clogged up both gas and air slides, so that 
the levers could not shift them. I had to fix the throttle 
full open and the air shut at starting, with the aid of a 
screw driver, and leave them there all day. Thanks to 
our easy regulations, I scored full marks till the fifth day, 
when a pin in my timing gear chewed up and converted 
me into an "also ran." After the display of energy thus 
necessitated, it was a pleasant change to loll in a car for 
a week, and penalize other unfortunates for similar mis- 
chances. 

I have never sampled your roads in the States, but if 
they are worse than those at the command of the Scottish 
riders, they must be past description. The first day, the 
riders had to tackle an ascent called Amulree, and de- 
scribed by one competitor as a "waeful bank." It goes on 
climbing for about a mile and a half, undulating in sections 
of grades varying from 1 in 10 to 1 in 5. Just when the 
aspiring competitor is heartily tired of it and knows that 
his engine is sick unto death of full throttle, while his 
wrists ache with holding his curvetting buck jumper of a 
cycle to a rough grass-grown track, the road suddenly goes 
stark, staring crazy. It twists and bends and turns back 
upon itself, and presents you with two V corners in a space 
of fifteen yards. Hugging the corners, the grade is about 
33 per cent.; if you swing wide, where the road was 
widened and banked for a recent automobile climb, you 
may get off with a 20 per cent. rise. This S bend fetched 
every single competitor out of his saddle, and the worst 
of it was that the moors are so far removed from civiliza- 
tion that there were few kindly hands ready to help with 
a shove. Above the corner, the wearying toil of 20 per 
cent, grade recommenced and continued for half a mile 
or so, barring one patch of level by the roadside, where a 
stretch of stones about two yards square gave the more 
energetic riders a chance to get on the move once more. 
Only three competitors got over this terrible section with- 
out loosing marks, and as it came early in a 200-mile run, 
others dropped marks later on. 

The next day brought a series of rough and tortuous 
mountain tracks, which, being faced in 'pouring rain, 
caused more cards to be blotted. The third day the fellows 
had to thread the backbone of the Highlands via an un- 
frequented glen, inhabited only by mountain sheep and a 
noble salmon river. Thirty miles of this resembled a 



macadamized road before the steam roller has come along, 
and tires generally collapsed. One unlucky wight was dis- 
covered sitting by the roadside looking lugubriously at a 
pair of burst tires; his covers had been wrenched off the 
rims simultaneously by a bad patch of stones, and both 
tubes had ballooned and split 

At the finish, two machines had gold medals for clean 
sheets; oddly enough both were ancient Triumphs, one a 
1008, the other a 1907. Eight machines had lost less than 
90 marks apiece, and took silver medals, this number in- 
cluding a selection of the best high-powered machines of 
the year, plus a lightweight 2^-h.p. Douglas, with twin 
horizontally opposed cylinders. Seven other machines 
finished more or less late, qualifying for bronze medals; 
and three more came in outside maximum time, getting 
nothing for all their pains. The men who failed had 
astounding stories to relate. One of them charged down a 
steep grass bank into a ravine, and was hauled out by four 
sturdy laborers. Another had a night out on the road, and, 
failing to rouse the night porter at the hotel, burgled a 
window and slept in the barn till breakfast time. Another 
ran over a dog and cracked his cylinder clean across the 
exhaust valve seating. Nothing daunted, he set to work 
and by a cute combination of plates and clamping bolts 
restored sufficient compression to carry him through, and 
he was in at the death. Several of the men occupied from 
three to four hours pushing their mounts up Amulree Hill. 

I have never studied a copy of your endurance run regu- 
lations, but there is a big difference between the English 
and Scotch rules. The English authorities start their trial 
with the intention of getting every man through with a 
gold medal, and the time margins are so liberal on the 
various control sections that unless a man has one serious 
trouble or a constant succession of minor derangements, 
he is dead sure to come through creditably. Needless to' 
say, these trials are more popular amongst the trade. 

The Scotch officials, on the other hand, take the view 
that the public wants the trial to range machines in a 
true order of merit. Consequently, they first select the 
stiffest route they can work out, and then they make the 
regulations rather tall. They split the route into fifty-mile 
controls, and each has to be covered at 20 miles an hour, 
with only a ten-minute margin early or late. This doesn't 
read so very stiff, but when you've chucked in a permanent 
head gale, continuous grease, several fierce ascents, and 
drenched the entire route with young boulders, it takes a bit 
of doing. As a consequence, when this trial is over, the 
award sheet shows only one or two machines with full 
marks; there can't be any flies on these. Reading down 
the roll, you are plainly shown how many and how long 
delays the other entrants have encountered, and they are 
all ranged in order of merit, which makes the trial very 
instructive to the private purchaser who has no other means 
of telling good stuff from indifferent or bad. 



HOUSTON, Texas. — The city government has received 
its second installment of motorcycles for use in the 
Police Department of Houston. The .machines are two 
3j4-hp. Indians and their arrival made the total number of 
police department machines four. However, an order has 
been placed for three more Indians for the use of Chief of 
Police George Ellis, Night Chief Murphy an<J Detective 
Kessler. 

CUMBERLAND, Tenn.— The Cumberland Telephone 
Company have bought a machine for the use of their 
"trouble" man, Robert Faine. 



OWING to the fact that J. G. De Gruchy, who rode in the 
Endurance Run from Cleveland to Indianapolis, made 
a change of machines from that indicated on the list of 
entries, a slight error was made in our account De Gruchy 
rode a Reading Standard and made a perfect score, thus 
adding three to the published percentage credited to that 
machine. 

J* J* 
/~\VER eight hundred licenses have been issued to 
^-^ owners of motorcycles since the new ordinance went 
into effect, July 1, in Los Angeles. The license fee 
amounts to one dollar. 



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## 


MY FIRST LONG TOUR 

BY E. M. ESTABROOK. 


#A 




► HAT a flood of pleasurable recollections 
the above title recalls — the anticipation, 
the preparation, the midnight vigils over 
various road maps in order to familiar- 
ize oneself with the intricate details of 
the route, so that not one precious 
moment would be wasted. All old riders 
will agree with me that there is some- 
thing fascinating — something that lives 
in memory's fondest alcoves — in connection with the first long 
tour awheel or the first long motor cruise. The incidents, 
sport or hardship of subsequent trips count for less and fail 
to awaken the same sentiments. The pleasures of anticipa- 
tion have taken wing in view of riper knowledge and mature 
experience, though keen pleasure and plenty of excitement are 
still extracted from similar trips. 

It is now several long, busy years since the writer finally 
inspected his i^-h.p. motorcycle and assured himself that 
everything was "fit" to take the initial long distance trip, 
which was to be from Bangor, Me., to Berlin, N. H., a dis- 
tance of 187 miles, as subsequently shown by cyclometer. The 
schedule called for twenty miles per hour and, having set 
this somewhat strenuous task for myself, I started out at 
6 o'clock on a pleasant morning in the early part of August, 
with a determination to make good. 

It had been raining for two days previous, and the roads 
were heavy and rough, with occasional puddles. Nothing 
daunted, however, I proceeded, though rather slowly, till the 
end of the first hour, when the cyclometer showed but eighteen 
miles. This would never do, and, determining to make a 
better showing, I succeeded in reeling off twenty-six miles 
during the next sixty minutes. The road conditions were not 
conducive to high speed but, having become well seated and 
free from nervousness, I was able to maintain my schedule 
for five hours, including necessary stops for direction, etc. 

At eleven o'clock I left Winthrop for South Paris, via 
South Wayne and Buckfield. The map clearly depicted a 
"bicycle road" in red lines, and I fell into the trap. There 
were no more speedy bursts of flight up hill, no more rapid 
or reckless descents under power, no more exhilarating 
swoops through leaf-shaded aisles. Instead, the road was a 
trackless series of sand dunes, practically unridable and, with 
the hot noonday sun pouring its burning rays upon me, I was 
almost overcome. At twelve o'clock I had progressed but 
five miles, and then, in sheer desperation, I rode the ditches 
and charged the hills, only to be thrown off again and again, 
and forced to tug and push the machine to a favorable spot, 
where another start could be made. For three hours I con- 
tinued to wallow through the sand and ride the gutters, 
fields and footpaths that here and there made through the 
bushes skirting the road; and while I took many harmless 
headers, I gained in proficiency and presently was able to 
do some pretty tall stunts, at a fair rate of speed, in sidepath 
riding through the bushes. I was now half way across the 
"bicycle road," having made fifteen miles in three hours. 

Presently I approached some wooded land and was pleased 
to find the road quite firm, although very rough and narrow. 



I proceeded to make up for lost time, but was much handi- 
capped by the bushes making it necessary to guard the face 
with one hand. While speeding up the narrow, straight path 
I perceived that the road seemed suddenly to terminate in a 
growth of tall trees and so, slackening my speed somewhat, 
I prepared to take the abrupt turn which I knew must be 
there. Swinging to the extreme left, I leaned to my right in 
order to cut the corner sharply, as it was a right-hand turn, 
and as I headed for the corner I was horrified to observe a 
pair of heavy and much frightened team of horses completely 
blocking the way. My speed, already too high for such an 
abrupt turn, could not be checked, and looking past the horses' 
heads I perceived the rocky bed of a stream about ten feet 
lower than the road, while a slender spruce pole acted for a 
railing to the bridge upon which the team proper was resting. 

What possible escape was there from a dilemma like this? 
To dash into the affrighted horses meant death beneath their 
feet. To clear the horses meant to dash through the slender 
railing and crash on the rocks ten feet below. I did not 
give up. There seemed to be a fighting chance, and as my 
usual nerve and self-possession were ably supported by the 
strategy board, I decided to make a fight for my life. As I 
headed for those horses, only twelve feet distant, I was 
supremely conscious of the unusual activity of my own mind. 
Every move I was to make was as carefully planned as if I 
had spent a week in its preparation, and every muscle in my 
body was as tense as whipcord. 

Seizing my cap, I waved it frantically while charging the 
horses and supplemented this by some warwhoops that would 
put a steam calliope out of business. The result was magical 
and worked exactly as planned. The terrified horses reared 
and pushed hard over to the inside of the curve, while I shot 
under the pole and the off-horse, just grazing the front wheel. 

I had now escaped the first great danger and my present 
peril lay in my speed and the direction in which my wheel 
was pointing. Would I be able to complete the turn or must 
I crash through the rail? A hasty observation showed that 
there was about four feet of space between the rail and the 
long lumber-laden team. It was a moment of terrible in- 
tensity, during which it seemed that the wheels must slip 
from under me. Nearer and nearer came my hand to the 
railing, until the rough bark tore the cuticle from my knuckles. 
Then we gradually assumed the perpendicular, and the battle 
was won. 

No knight or Roman gladiator, fresh from victories, ever 
felt more elation than I did at this moment. I wanted to 
make the welkin ring with shouts of acclaim. Instead, I 
merely glanced at the two dazed men who sat upon the lum- 
ber and, jauntily raising my cap, I bade them a "merry and 
pleasant time o' day." Then, throwing on the spark and 
throttle, I rapidly sped into the distance. In three more 
hours I had made another fifteen miles and gotten on to 
the main highway leading to Berlin, my destination. It was 
forty-two miles to Berlin, over a road that seemed good by 
comparison, and I covered it in two hours without incident 
worthy of note. It was altogether an interesting trip, and I 
enjoyed it. 



A CLASS of men who are finding the motorcycle an ideal 
instrument for their work are the subscription agents, 
men who travel from State to State pursuing the elusive 
"sub." For instance, a paper of Missoula, Mont., notes the 
arrival in town of Louis H. Savoy, of Butte, who is working 
as agent for several technical papers, and who is touring the 
State in their interest. 



ACCORDING to figures compiled by the Denver Fire 
and Police board, the number of automobiles and 
motorcycles owned in Denver is 3,754, and 913 of these 
have been registered since January 1. Since June 30, when 
the new system of numbering motorcycles went into effect, 
89 machines have been registered. These are not included 
in the 913. 



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SEPl EMBER 1, 1909. 



THE CALL FOR THE TWO-SPEED GEAR 

BY R. C. LAURIE. 



IT is the hope of many in our ranks that more manufac- 
turers may "rise to the occasion" shortly, and supply 
us with well-made, reliable two-speed gears. This despite 
the fact that in a few cases this need has been recognized. 
The early pattern of two-speed gear, marketed by a go- 
ahead company about three or four years ago, had its 
minor faults, but these seem to have been overcome, and 
from a lengthy trial of the same I can say that the whole 
arrangement seems to be practically "foolproof" and thor- 
oughly efficient in action. However, manufacturers, as a 
whole, seem to be fighting shy of two-speed gears, in the 
same way that they neglected the magneto and, save for 
one or two enterprising designers to whom all honor is 
due, seem to fear to add complications to the construction 
of their machines. This fear of adding complications, it 
will be remembered, stayed the advent of the magneto until 
automobile designers practically forced it down our 
throats. 

To review the question, therefore, with an open mind, 
let us look at it from a practical point of view, and profit 
by the demonstrations in actual road practice elsewhere. 
Many British manufacturers are selling two-speed models, 
some even adopting this as a standard design, and the 
showing of these machines in public is excellent to a 
degree, even in speed tests and, of course, in hill-climbing 
competitions. In the form of hill-climb, where one has to 
stop and restart at a certain point, the two-speeder nearly 
always comes out triumphant, while in the passenger class 
for side-cars and tri-cars, a two-speed gear is practically a 
necessity. 

I will not enumerate the manufacturers who fit a change 
speed to any particular model. These are well known, and 
should be nailed as missionaries of a growing necessity. 
The point to be forced right home is that whether the 
speed gear be of planetary (or epicyclic) principle or of 
the sliding gear type, it must be made substantial and 
practically "foolproof," for to introduce complications in 
mechanism is decided retrogression, if such mechanism is 
likely to give continuous trouble. The planetary type of 
gear seems to be likely to gain the day, inasmuch as it 
lends itself better to motorcycle construction, and is more 
of the "foolproof" variety because of the fact that the ac- 
tion of changing gears requires less skill. In the miniature 
car gearbox of the sliding gear design, bad gear changing 
spoils the teeth of the gears. Any automobile driver 
knows what damage can be done in this direction, as it is 
one of the motorcar novice's first lessons. Again, the teeth 
of such gears have to be of exceedingly tough material. 
This, coupled with the fact that the teeth have to mesh 
quite accurately, renders the sliding gear the most ex- 
pensive to manufacture. 

The planetary type, however, costs slightly less to manu- 



facture, although this point is open to discussion, whereas 
both absorb a certain amount of power in frictional loss. 
The planetary gear again lends itself to belt drive, but, as 
we have in no way reached finality in design with regard 
to transmission, this point only can be placed on the credit 
side for the time being. 

Hard road experience teaches us to look upon the two- 
speed gear as an absolute necessity for a passenger ma- 
chine and an untold advantage on a touring machine. The 
demand for the passenger machine is growing steadily, so 
that the maker of a first class two-speed gear, according 
to a sound design, will reap the harvest of his foresight. 
Now, suppose a rider of a powerful twin-cylinder machine, 
with a sidecar attached, encounters a steep hill with the 
roadway blocked with traffic. It is then necessary to climb 
that hill with a double load, and take it slowly; here the 
single gear fails. The same case may be applied to a single 
machine, only the point is not so much emphasized. The 
hill may be winding and steep, making it dangerous to ride 
upon, except at a slow pace, or there may be grease to con- 
tend with. Sometimes, too, the driver of a passenger ma- 
chine has to take a route through a city, and with a two- 
speed gear he can run his engine at normal speed and wind 
slowly and easily through the densest traffic. 

Who has not struck a veritable mountain when on tour? 
Even in ordinary trips on a week-end ride this sometimes 
happens, and would not the addition of an emergency 
gear have been a boon and a blessing at such a time? 
There are occasions, too, when the engine has lost its 
"kick," when even the average hill has its terrors, except 
to the two-speeder. The pleasure of a tour is often min- 
imized, sometimes spoiled entirely, by the dread terrors of 
mountain scaling — especially when it comes to pushing a 
machine weighing some two hundred pounds up a hill 
like the side of a house. Again, what do our brothers in 
the states of sandy roads say to this? We cannot wait for- 
ever for the road improvement committees to get past 
the paper stage of their slow-moving operations; we must 
tackle the problem ourselves by the most direct route, and 
the two-speed gear is the ultimate solution to the difficulty 
of persuading an overworked mount to pump its weary 
way through heavy sand. The Mexican government has 
specially recognized the two-speed geared machine, and 
has placed an order for two or three mounts so fitted. 
These motorcycles are intended for postal delivery work 
in districts where sand and heavy roads are the order of 
the day. We can hardly overlook such selection from a 
hard-headed business point of view, so let us get busy. 
From a practical standpoint, I have found two-speed 
devices to be of great use, provided the design is fit to 
stand hard wear and the material used is of a durable 
quality. 



BRIEF OUTLINE OF HIS POLICY BY THE NEW PRESIDENT OF THE FEDERATION. 



Edttor Motorcycle Illustrated, 

AT the national meeting of the F. A. M. held at Indianapo- 
lis on August 14th, as you are aware, I was elected 
president. At no time was I a candidate for this office, nor 
did I solicit any support from any factions or interests what- 
soever, yet at the final meeting it was the choice of a large 
majority that I should be the next president. 

Now that I have been elected and accepted the office, I 
propose to administer these affairs to the best of my ability 
and to the credit of the F. A. M. as well as to myself. In 
doing so I will appoint the best committees I can, but will 
reserve this for further consideration. I sincerely trust that 
I may have the hearty co-operation and support of your pub- 



lication in my endeavors to give the F. A. M. a good ad- 
ministration. Let the watchword for 1910 be "A bigger and 
better F. A. M. than ever before !." 

I will cheerfully submit to criticism from the press for 
any mistakes I may make, but I feel that the best interests 
of the F. A. M. can best be advanced by the hearty co- 
operation of the press and all of its members. I am abso- 
lutely without alliances or obligations to anyone, and am 
therefore in a position to administer the office fairly to all. 
Thanking you in advance for your support, and for your 
kindly consideration, I remain 

Yours very truly, 

Indianapolis, Aug. 17, 1909. F. I. WILLIS. 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Tips and Topics — By the Veteran 



B| H. DA VIES' recent description of the two-stroke 
I British built Scott certainly impresses one with 
the thought of the neglect of this type, and the 
field for research which it opens. We may ex- 
pect some big developments in this design, 
which has appeared from time to time in automobile con- 
struction. A tiny two-stroke engine attachment, which 
drove by friction wheel on the front tire, was once 
marketed to fit the pedal-driven bicycles, but the company, 
known as the Ixion, failed to attract much public notice. 
In gasoline launches we often find the two-stroke idea 
cropping up. Taking into consideration what has been 
generally known as the standard type of two-stroke en- 
gine construction, anyone who had been hitherto only 
familiar with the working of the four-cycle engine is struck 
instantly by the reduction of working parts and the sim- 
plicity of design in an engine of the two-stroke type. First 
of all, there are no valves, cams, or gear wheels; besides 
an impulse is obtained at every revolution of the crank 
instead of one impulse every two revolutions as is the 
case in the four-cycle engine. Since all the moving parts 
are continually under a load, the wear and tear is less and 
engine "hammering" is entirely eradicated. 

THE inexperienced man ponders over this, and naturally 
remarks: "Surely this design must be right — why 
bother with complicated valve systems and two to four- 
cylinder engines?'' Those, however, who know thoroughly 
the leading features of the two types of engine construc- 
tion and have followed practical experiments by auto- 
mobile constructors, are aware that the two-stroke engine 
in its simplest or its original forms, is easily outweighed 
in point of all-round merit by the best types of four-stroke 
engines. There is the all-important factor of weight, 
wherein it will be found that a very considerably higher 
power for a given weight of engine is obtainable with the 
four-strolce. A "standard" design of gasoline engine is 
not yet made, nor are we past the experimental era; and 
the question of finality in design will not be settled for 
many years to come. It is interesting to note that, as we 
are on the outset of the "aero-age," so to speak, light and 
efficient engines are required. Up to the present, however, 
all aeroplane engines are of the four-cycle type. To re- 
duce the matter to the simplest terms: The output of 
power obtainable from a given size of cylinder depends 
primarily upon getting that cylinder as nearly as possible 
full of explosive mixture, and it is just this that the ordi- 
nary two-stroke engine will not do. 

AS against the separate suction and exhausting strokes 
of the four-cycle engine the fresh charge in a two- 
cycle motor is forced from the crank case into the cylinder, 
simultaneously with the exhaust gas rushing out by virtue 
of its own pressure. By deflecting the incoming gas up to 
the top of the cylinder, an effort is made to prevent the 
intermingling of the fresh charge and the burnt gas, and 
also to obtain a displacement effect from the incoming 
charge. The efficiency of this operation-cycle is open to 
question, as the power stroke cannot be very marked. 
Many other drawbacks might be enumerated, such as the 
mingling of the crank case charge of gas with oil spray, 
which cannot improve the mixture; this, however, seems 
to have been eliminated in the Scott engine. Even with 
these drawbacks, we are all well aware that there are 
thousands of these simple two-stroke engines working and 
giving satisfaction for certain classes of work, particularly 
in launches; but it does not follow that because an engine 
will work well enough as a stationary power unit, it is bet- 
ter or even as good as the existing type for motorcycle 
design. The fact remains that the two-cycle principle, like 
the horseshoe nail, is always turning up. 



OBVIOUSLY the design can be improved upon; indeed, 
many have tried to overcome this difficulty. How- 
ever, these designers almost invariably depart from the 
simple type of engine and start at once to add parts — extra 
cylinders, valves and gearing — with a view of eliminating 
certain of the faults which I have touched upon. The 
fact remains that no modified type of two-cycle engine has, 
as yet, made much impression on engine constructors, and 
this in itself is sufficient proof that the problem is more 
difficult than many realize. If greater simplicity can be 
obtained only by dropping far below the present power 
standard that would not be engineering progress, although, 
if it could be shown that a large gain in simplicity could 
be attained with a relatively slight falling off from the 
standard, such an engine would be bound to attract gen- 
eral attention with a view to bringing it up to the highest 
standard. It is well to remember that the steam turbine 
went through this phase and came out triumphant. Its 
sheer simplicity in construction compared with reciprocat- 
ing marine engines absolutely compelled attention, al- 
though in the early stages of its development it fell far 
short of the efficiency of the highly developed quadruple- 
expansion engine. 

J* J* 

ANOTHER puzzle which points to incorrect carbureter 
adjustment is persistent misfiring at slow speeds. A very 
likely cause of this is that the carbureter is getting too much 
air, and the cure, in some types, is to fit a smaller choke tube 
and increase the extra air inlet as, by so doing, you can get 
less air at slow speeds and more at high, which, of course, 
makes for far greater efficiency from the power plant. 
J* J* 

SOMETIMES a machine is afflicted with an unaccountable 
spell of uneven running. The cause of this is often dust 
on the air screen of the carbureter and, once this is cleaned, 
the machine will resume its normal running conditions. Just 
about this time of the year there is quite an epidemic of minor 
carbureter troubles. These are caused mostly by dust and 
grit getting into the gizzards of the carbureter, and causing 
it to go on strike for a while. Therefore, in the hot, dry 
season, it is distinctly advisable to "take down" the carbureter 
from time to time and give it a thorough clean-out, as the 
running results will well repay you for the time spent on 
the job. 

# J* 

PLAYING with the wrench. — It does not do to tinker with 
things too much. I once heard of a man who took his 
dining-room clock to pieces, just for fun, and, somehow or 
other, managed to get the pieces together again. A friend 
called upon him a day or two after, looked at the clock and 
inquired whether it was right. "Fairly so," answered the 
amateur craftsman. "When the hands indicate ten minutes 
to eleven and it strike" two, I know it is seven o'clock." By 
this little parable I wish to impress upon the would-be me- 
chanic that you can make too many so-called adjustments and 
cause more harm than good. In particular, when running 
over the nuts with a heavy wrench, be careful not to overdo 
it and strip the threads of nuts and bolts with too much 
huskytude. Remember you are playing with delicate machin- 
ery, not screwing up angle irons in a railroad construction 
camp. 

J* .* 

ANOTHER valuable formula embodying stroke. — Our 
formula fiend must have got lost in a maze of figures, 
I can forgive him, for here is another imported formula 
which, besides considering stroke, gives one a headache. This 
has been brought forward by that clever Anglo-American 
combination, Messrs. Rolls-Royce, the former once a De Dion 
tricycle enthusiast, the latter hailing from the city of New 
York. Here's the formula: 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



H. P. = .25 (d-i-2)'Ni/s 
in which "d" equals the diameter of the cylinder in inches, 
'V the length of the stroke in inches, and "N" the number 
of cylinders. It can be seen that this formula includes the 
length of the stroke, an omission which seems to have broken 
the heart of our esteemed contributor. 
•H .* 

A RACE for standard touring machines. — I notice that a 
very successful form of automobile race is being adopted 
by the Brooklands Racing Club in England. This might well 
be copied in some of our motorcycle race meets, and should 
provide great sport and close finishes. The idea is to select 
any popular make of car, and a particular model of a certain 
horsepower, and have a race for private owners of these 
stock cars, calling it a "stock car race." The results of these 
races show a series of very close finishes, which mean good 
sport from a spectacular point of view. 

OILING lightweights. — Having ridden a lightweight re- 
cently, I found that the only oil to use is the one the 
jnakers recommend and, not being able to procure it every- 
where, I had to take a can with me. When one uses a thick 
or "heavy" air-cooled oil on a lightweight, the engine has an 
annoying trick of gumming up horribly, causing serious loss 
of power. Again, these small power plants don't require as 
much oil as their heavier brethren. 
* Jt 

A LIGHTWEIGHT tour.— New England boasts of fine 
roads and an attractive variety of scenery — all this I 
can vouch for from experience. I do not know whether this 
year is in any way out of the ordinary, but I have been cov- 
ering a good deal of this ground on a popular lightweight, 



and have been greatly bothered by wind. Traveling on a 
calm day, or with the wind, on a lightweight of medium 
power, is the essence of enjoyment, but when one has to 
face a strong, continuous blast, reminding one of the open 
prairie, it is another matter altogether. For unless one sits 
low the machine is perceptibly slowed, and as soon as shelter 
is reached, darts forward with renewed life. Yet, in spite of 
this, no signs of overheating were observed, and it was very 
rare to strike an entirely unsheltered hill, so, beyond cutting 
down the average daily run perceptibly, no other effects were 
to be noticed; still, there were occasions on really bad days 
when I was nearly blown to a standstill. 

A FEW final tiplets. — Before bidding you a sad farewell — 
until next issue — weather and editor permitting, I will 
just fire off a few crusted axioms: Keep your coaster brake 
flushed out with kerosene from time to time, then clean the 
same with thin oil, and don't forget to give a fresh dose 
of lubricating oils after that. Whenever you hear a strange 
and unknown noise emanating from the motor (not from a 
cow over the hedge), get off and investigate, lest damage 
may be caused by the omission. If you happen to take the 
engine to pieces at any time, turn the bushing round, as this 
will ensure new life. Oiling an engine little and often is far 
better than injecting heavy doses. Use a large, well-sprung 
saddle, and you will enjoy your rides tenfold — I notice that 
a great many old-pattern motorcycles are fitted with saddles 
totally inadequate for the purpose, which is enough to give 
any one the so-called "motorcycle face." When on a tour 
carry a spare belt, or some extra chain links. Butt-ended 
tubes save a lot of time and temper — try 'em and see. Don't 
ride with the tires too hard on bad roads — it bores you. 



A NEW FOUR-WHEELER 

MEXICO, Mo.— E. B. Sellard is completing a four- 
wheeled "motorcycle," practically all of which is his 
own invention. He has fitted it with a new system of 
water cooling, new gear arrangement and clutch. At the 
trial performance of the machine it worked perfectly. 

The frame is of piping, and through it the water passes 
to the engine and back to the radiator, cooling as it makes 
the trip. He has a 2 h. p. engine on the machine fitted 
with a special clutch, a differential gear of his own 
invention. 

The whole will be covered with a neatly painted tin 
frame shortly, and a proof of its practicability attempted. Mr. 
Sellard expects to complete a pleasure vehicle which will be 
not only cheap, but durable as well. 



A FRIEND recently recommended fish glue for a leaky 
crank-case, and I tried it after a vain "rassle" with 
brown paper gaskets, shellac, etc It worked to perfection. 
Any big paint store sells fish glue — ten cents' worth will sup- 
ply you for the balance of your natural life. Get a little 
double glue pot at the ten-cent store (they all have them), 
cook your glue until it is of a nice consistency, and apply it 
liberally to both edges of the case, having previously removed 
all oil and all traces of previous "fillers." It is well to warm 
the case a trifle before applying the glue — just to a point 
where it is noticeably warm, not hot Then apply your glue, 
get the "innards" in the crank case as quickly as possible, 
slide on cylinder and head and set up hard on your bolts. 
In about half an hour set up again if you can. Then let it 
alone for 24 hours, and unless the case is very, very badly 
out of line, you'll find it will never leak a drop. 

PR that specially inaccessible nut, from which the monkey- 
wrench slips off and barks your knuckles, get a little 
drop-forged S-wrench. The hardware stores have them, in 
all sizes, at 15 cents and upwards. 



BETTER ROADS OR NO MAIL. 

JACKSON, MISS. — The motorcycle is coming into use as 
a mode of conveyance for rural free delivery carriers in 
Mississippi. Advices received here by the local postoffice 
authorities state that in several of the northern counties of 
the State the motorcycle experiment has been tried with much 
success by carriers, and is coming generally into use on 
routes where the roads are in fair condition. It is valueless, 
it is said, during heavy weather, but as a mode of convey- 
ance on good days it enables the carriers to cover their routes 
in about half the time usually consumed when traveling on 
horseback or in buggies. 

Incidentally, the spread of the rural free delivery system 
is an important factor in the building of better roads in 
Mississippi. Spurred to activity by threats from the Post- 
office Department that rural routes would be abandoned un- 
less the roads were improved, boards of supervisors are giving 
more serious attention to the subject 
* & 

MILWAUKEE, Wis.— Chief of Police John T. Janssen 
is a firm believer in the use of motorcycles for the 
police department, and is anxious to organize a special 
motorcycle squad. At present there are three Milwaukee 
policemen using motorcycles, but Chief Janssen wants 
this number increased to an even dozen. He states that 
Philadelphia now has a squad of fifty motorcops, who are 
doing more work than two hundred foot patrolmen 
could do. 

AC. GOWDY, assistant superintendent for Olds, Wort- 
• man & King, of Portland, Ore., was recently made 
the recipient of a $285 motorcycle, presented to him by the 
employes of the firm as a token of their esteem. Mr. Gowdy 
has always wanted a motorcycle, and in view of this fact 
some of the employes of the house conceived the idea of 
making up a purse and presenting a machine to him as a token 
of their respect. Accordingly this was done, an appropriate 
presentation speech being made by W. P. Olds. 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



11 



THE OPEN ROAD: By Outrider 



THIS is intended for one type of rider in particular. We 
will name him the "butterfly," for he is a lover of fair 
weather and of the dustless turnpike, hugging the environs 
of his city. He knows not of the great beyond, but every 
week we see him riding along the familiar route, to meet, 
perhaps, some boon companion of like calibre. Let him but 
read this, and mayhap the scales will fall from his eyes, 
and he will develop, by gradual stages, into the self-reliant 
tourist, who knows his machine so well that he does not 
need to be forever near some repair shop. It requires but 
little experimental work to gain the wonderful "wander- 
lust," that desire for "pastures new," which cannot be 
satiated and which grows with years. What cares the genuine, 
well-equipped tourist for road surface? He is not riding 
to any set schedule and it matters not where he lays his 
head that night — ay, there's the charm of it all! The subtle 
fascination of the country, the open region which lies be- 
yond the office, the suburb, the railway station and the 
summer resort, is, to him, quite irresistible. The kind of 
pleasure which we feel in free and unrestrained road travel 
is something which no other known experience can afford, 
and, being sane and healthy, is fast winning its way to 
special recognition. 

The railroad does not supplant the road; it simply sup- 
plements it. The scenery of the railroad, with its never- 
ending vista of poles, cuttings, etc., cannot compare with 
that of the lane and byway, so that a journey by train 
counts for . nothing — it is mere transit. As soon as the 
fascination of speed, mere speed and nothing else, has 
weakened, the tourist begins to be sensible of all manner 
of things interesting and beautiful, and he loses the mere 
"professional" instinct of listening for signs of trouble akin 
to veteran and novice alike. 

To spend weeks in one locality is a practice to be decried 
and abandoned, while the contrast of surroundings is quite 
another and a newer thing. Mountains are grander to the 
eyes fresh from the plain, the moor is more fascinating 
with sounds of the upland still in the ears, the scent of 
the woodlands the sweeter when it drives out from the 
nostrils the whiff of the seaweed. Only by the freedom 
of the road can this perpetual freshness of impression 
be retained, and thus may a tour be glorified by wander- 
ing through a pamoramic change of country. 

I fear that most of our tours are too stereotyped. We 
"map out" our route, selecting choice roads which may 
or may not lie in interesting districts, or in places where 
variety can be procured. It is best to bear in mind that the 
mingled impressions of a tour make for its fascination, and 
thus, although maps may be our guide, schedules and 
defined routes should be avoided. A leisurely tour by 
highroad and lane is an incomparable experience, present- 
ing such a luxuriant profusion of sights and impressions, 
that he who has an eye to see, mind to interpret and a 
heart to feel must return repaid a hundredfold for his 



trouble. The panorama which unfolds itself before the 
rider from day to day, seems almost inexhaustible in the 
variety of its appeal. The object, therefore, of every 
motorcycling tourist, should be to learn to appreciate these 
things outside of the every-day, humdrum existence and 
to see all that is of interest within the compass of the day's 
journey, and to stay awhile at the places of interest, his- 
toric or otherwise. 

It might be thought by those who have not considered 
the matter and who, perhaps, have not realized what a 
large amount of information a map can be made to con- 
vey, that there is nothing to be said concerning these, and 
that all a man ought to do in the matter is to go to the 
nearest mapsellers and choose any series which happens 
to be handy. The art of choosing and using maps re- 
quires a critical knowledge of theinvarieties, or what might 
be called their language. It is not merely between good 
ones and bad ones that the map buyer has to choose, for 
too frequently a map is judged by certain appearances 
which, as a rule, have little to do with the qualities which 
constitute excellence for real purposes. At the present 
moment some districts and some states are not very well 
off for good road maps, the survey map being usually too 
bulky and the district and route maps not clearly defined. 
However, we are gradually getting further towards per- 
fection in this respect; indeed, the Automobile Club, of 
America is attending to this matter, slowly but thorough- 
ly, and many other centers are following an excellent lead 
in this respect. 

A machine of low horsepower should not be overloaded. 
One's baggage must therefore be reduced to a minimum; 
otherwise, unless the machine is geared extremely low, 
hills will present terrors. Of course, it need hardly be said 
that a good two-speed gear is the means of rendering a 
trip into the wilds enjoyable in the extreme, but, if this is 
not fitted a variable pulley becomes a luxury well worth having. 

The riding kit has been recently touched upon. A light 
change of clothes throughout should be added. This can 
be secured to the carrier in a small flat valise or grip. A 
light rainproof coat is also a blessing. For necessary 
spares in addition to the usual kit, as mentioned in our 
recent A. B. C. articles, we might include an extra belt or 
chain, fasteners and links, two spare-butted tubes, not 
forgetting the all-important valves and springs, keys, 
spark plugs and gaskets. We must be practical as well 
as poetical, for the enjoyment of the beauties of nature 
must not be marred by disconcerting delays. 

In conclusion, to the fair weather and "butterfly" rider, 
I say: Try the open road and gain confidence in yourself 
and your machine, for distance in reality holds no limita- 
tions to the real motorcyclist. You will not regret it. 
There are men of our ranks — personally I can vouch for 
four — who have toured over prairie ti ails, and again in 
foreign lands, and are not tired of it yet ! 



IF your motorcycle is not of the tank-in-the-rear variety, 
here's a good stunt that helps toward easy removal of the 
rear wheel — usually a difficult task, especially with belt ma- 
chines. Cut your mudguard just ahead of the forward brace, 
and rivet in a 2x3 steel hinge. (Be careful to ask for a 
tight-pin, not a loose-pin hinge.) The leaves of the hinge 
will need to be curved slightly to fit the curve of the mud- 
guard. Notch the guard so the hinge will fit in flush, leaving 
no gap in the guard. Use 3/16-inch rivets — three of them on 
each side. Then, when you are out on the road and it be- 
comes necessary to take the rear wheel out, simply remove 
the two screws that hold the mudguard braces to the rear 
stays, tilt up the guard, and, after the other processes are 



attended to, your wheel will come out as gently as a lamb, 
and without any gymnastics or profanity. 

INSTEAD of swathing your handlebar with tire tape in 
order to make your horn fit a bar for which it was never 
intended, try this: Take out the screws. Bend up the lugs 
on the horn until it seems to hug the bar snugly. Reshape 
the loose clip until it approximately fits. This will throw one 
of the screw holes about V\ inch out of line. Drill a new 
hole, cut off the clip and round the end. Put in your screws 
and tighten them and your horn is in place for keeps. Most 
"taped" horns are shaken to pieces in a month. I have one, 
treated as above, that has outlasted three of the "taped" sort 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



FALL RUN OF HARLEM CLUB TO ATLANTIC CITY, SEPTEMBER 4, 5 AND 6 

pleasure affair — racing will under no circumstances be per- 
mitted by the management, under penalty of penalization. 
One of the features of the second day will be a brake test 
at some point unknown to the contestants. Riders not 
qualifying in this event will be penalized 25 points. Full 
instructions regarding this test will be given before the 
start from Farmingdale on the second day. 

Two handsome gold medals will be awarded to the 
riders having the highest number of points in the single 
and multi-cylinder class, those completing the run with a 
score of not less than 900 points will receive silver medals, 
while all those finishing will receive bronze medals, all at 
the club's expense. 

The total expense for the run will be only $7.25. Entries 
should be sent to L. H. Guterman, 103 East 125th street. 
New York. 



THE annual fall run of the Harlem Club will be to 
Atlantic City and return, Sept. 4, 5 and 6. The schedule 
follows: First Day — Headquarters, South Ferry, St. 
George, Perth Amboy, South Amboy, Lower Matawan, 
Freehold, and Farmingdale. 

Second Day. — Farmingdale, Lakewood, Toms River, 
Waretown, Tuckertown, Pleasantville and Atlantic City. 

Third Day. — Atlantic City, Waretown, Farmingdale, 
Perth Amboy and Headquarters. 

The fact that the controls have been arranged to allow 
a speed of 14 to 18 miles per hour, will permit novices on 
low-powered machines to make the controls as easily as 
more experienced riders, while deductions for unwar- 
ranted speeds will add a tinge of excitement to the run, 
and at the same time give all riders an opportunity to win 
one of the gold medals. The event is to be purely a 




'HIS is part of the members of the R. S. club, just or- 
ganized at Danvers, Mass. Those who appear in the 



picture, reading from left to right, are D. Abbott, D. McLeon, 
P. W. Cutter, W. J. Walker, T. Cloutmon and S. Hennigan. 



ARTICLES of incorporation were filed recently in the office 
of the Essex county clerk by George P. Fawcett, 
Newark; Kenneth D. Owen, Montclair ; Herbert E. Coryell, 
East Orange, and P. Wilmer Stevens and George E. Post, who 
have organized under the name of the New Jersey Motorcycle 
Club for mutual protection, social purposes and the building 
of a clubhouse. The present headquarters of the organization 
are at 287 Mulberry street. Carl W. Bush, of Caldwell, N. J., 
has succeeded Thayer McLaren as secretary. The member- 
ship has been largely increased this summer. 



MACON, Ga.— At the organization meeting of the Motor- 
cycle Club of Bibb County, the following officers were 
elected : W. M. Sampler, president ; P. D. Griffith, secretary ; 
W. K. Walton, treasurer; Leighton Brown, physician and 
surgeon, and Tom Brown, Bebb Orr and C. F. Baumgarten, 
machinists. 

THE Minneapolis club will postpone the erection of a club- 
house until next year. The state fair track will not 
be ready for racing for several weeks. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



13 




THE fall 150-mile run of the Linden Motorcycle Club, from 
Brooklyn to South Haven and return, will take place 
Sunday, September 19th, 1909. In case of rain, the run will 
be held Sunday, September 26th. The run will start promptly 
at 8.00 a. m. at the club headquarters, 1604 Bushwick avenue, 
Brooklyn (one block from Eastern Parkway). The first 
fifty miles are laid out over the beautiful roads on the north- 
ern shore of Long Island, thence across the Island, the last 
K» miles being over the Merrick Road. Checking Stations 



will be located at Oyster Bay, Cold Springs, Massapequa and 
South Haven. A dinner stop is to be made on the way out at 
Somerset House, in East Islip. Arrangements have been 
made with the proprietor to furnish dinner to the riders at 
fifty cents each. An entry fee of $1.50 will be charged, and 
a handsome silver medal of original design will be awarded 
(as the Club's expense) to all who complete the run within 
the time limits. Entries should be forwarded to Capt. John 
Behm, Linden Motorcycle Club, 1604 Bushwick avenue, 
Brooklyn. 



A PERMANENT organization of the Peoria club was 
effected at a meeting held recently, during which 
officers were elected as follows: Toby Vanbuskirk, presi- 
dent; E. R. Shanemeyer. secretary-treasurer; Milton 
Hitchcock, captain of the club runs. 

/"XTTAWA, III.— The members of the Illinois Valley Club 
^/ will hold their first annual race meet on Labor Day at 
the La Salle Driving Park. In addition to five or six motor- 
cycle events, there wilt be at least two automobile races. 



E ASTON, Pa., riders Have just organized with the fol- 
lowing officers : — President, Charles Glackin, of Phil- 
lipsburg. N. J.; Treasurer, Allen Hoffman, of Raubsville; 
Secretary, Charles R. Boyer ; Captain, J. S. Deyshcr, of 
Easton. 

Jt & 

HOUSTON, Tex.— Auston W. Burges, in charge of the lo- 
cal Indian agency, is planning the organization of a club 
here. Full particulars may be obtained from him at Adoue- 
Blaine headquarters, corner Main and Capitol. 



DOWAGIAC. Mich.— Mr. and Mrs. Fred Phillips gave a 
motorcyclists dinner a week ago Sunday at their cot- 
tage at Indian Beach. Covers were laid for twenty-seven. 
Those present were: W. X. Sawyer, Miss Hattie Pray, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. C. Pray. Mr. and Mrs. Clint W. Voorhees, Leon 



Tice, Wurden LaMott, Fred Murphy and family, Orville Will- 
iams and family. Duane Powell, Ralph Stafford, Charles 
Behnke, Wilmot Bills, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Phillips and Mr. 
and Mrs. Will Stewart. Mr. Phillips is the Indian agent 
for this territory. Below is a photo of the company. 




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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 




AVERY successful run was conducted, Sunday, August 22, 
by the Rochester Club. Thirty riders participated, in- 
cluding Miss M. E. Conley, Mrs. A. Neflf and Mrs. J. A. 
Malone, who rode on tandems. Despite the fact that six miles 
of the trip was over a road undergoing repairs, there were 
only two punctures. On Saturday, August 21, .the club con- 
ducted two five-mile races on the Union Hill half-mile track. 
E. Stauder, on an Indian, won both races, for doubles and 
singles respectively. 

WORCESTER, Mass.— The local club had a ladies' night 
at its clubhouse at the lake August 24, and it was made 
an occasion to give Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Tannebring, who 
were married the previous Saturday, a sendoff. The club- 
house was decorated with Japanese lanterns and a flashlight 
picture was taken of the assemblage. Mrs. Tannebring was 
hostess and was assisted by Mrs. F. E. Choate. 

FRANK FALK, of the Underwood Typewriter Co., of St. 
Louis, is on a motorcycle tour to Boston. His route is 
by way of Quincy, Chicago, Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, Buf- 
falo and Albany. He will return by way of Hartford, New 
York, Pittsburg, Cincinnati and Indianapolis and will be out 
three months. 

<* Jt 

THE Ascot Park race track will be used by the Los An- 
geles Club for a race meet September 9th. A record- 
breaking crowd is expected to be in attendance. 



FAST WORK ON THE ROAD. 

ONE of the leading motorcycle enthusiasts of the south 
is Earl J. McCone, Captain of the Savannah Motorcycle 
Club, of Savannah, Ga. Mr. McCone rides an Excelsior and 
so confident is he of his ability to get away from any opponent 
that he has offered to ride with any motorcyclist of that vi- 
cinity any distance from one mile up for a dollar per mile. 

Mr. McCone recently rode a match race with another local 
rider, under the auspices of the Savannah Motorcycle Club 
and checked and timed by the officials of that organization, 
over a course nineteen miles in length, the greater portion of 
which was over roads on which the Grand Prize Cup race was 
held. There are thirty-two turns in this course, and the 
greater number are square corners, with no banking of any 
sort. Some are covered with loose sand. 

Mr. McCone easily won, making one hundred miles in two 
hours and fourteen minutes flat On some of the straight- 
away stretches he made sixty-two miles per hour, and one 
strip of five miles, in which there are three right-angled turns, 
was made in exactly five and one-half minutes. 

Mr. McCone, while a young man, is one of the old timers in 
the motorcycle field and has ridden practically every leading 
make of machine. His home was originally in Chicago, where 
he is now spending a few days. It is his intention to ride to 
New York on his Excelsior and make the return trip to 
Savannah bv steamer. 

A RECORD event was the run recently made from Los 
Angeles to Venice by the Los Angeles Motorcycle Club. 
Between 235 and 240 single machines and fifty-four tandems 
participated. The run was made to the seashore in one hour 
and ten minutes. The start was made at 9 a. m., Derkum 
and Hubert Tuttle acting as pacemakers. Near the city hall 
at Venice these two riders slowed down and the club members 
paraded Windward Avenue in a compact body. The club en- 
joyed a banquet upon its return. About 200 persons were 
present. The Riverside, Pasadena, and Hollywood clubs were 
represented in the run. 

A "FLEET* of fifteen Reading-Standard motorcycles is 
maintained by a delivery firm in Kansas City to supple- 
ment the 45 horse-drawn package wagons which it operates. 
The little machines cover from 75 to 100 miles a day. 




Earl J. McCone. 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



15 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 

Vol. IV. SEPTEMBER i, 1909. No.. 17 

Published 

Twice a Month, 1st and 15th 

By the 

Motorcycle Publishing Company 

F. P. PRIAL Pre* and Treat. THOS. HILL LOW, Sec 



Offices, 299 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Telephone, Worth 3691 



Home Subscriptions, $1.00 Foreign Subscriptions, $100 
Single Copies, 10 cts. 

Entered as second class matter July 6th, 1908, at the Post Office 
at New York, N. Y„ under act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

General Editorial and Business Direction 
F. P. Prial 



J. Leo Sauer -----.„. Editor 
L. H. Cornish Advertising 



THOSE ECHOES. 

OUR friends appear loath to let the big fuss go, for in a 
recent issue there are two or three pages of "echoes," 
after-thoughts, comments. 

We. ourselves, have after-thoughts about the Indianapolis 
meet; but we prefer to commit the new rules and all the rest 
of it to Time. Now we see through a glass darkly, but, after 
several moons, things will be diamond-clear and then we 
will all know how to take another step forward 

It is easy to write the pungent paragraph, a form of ex- 
pression which seems habitual with our friends. We, our- 
selves, for these twenty years past, have been charged with 
having clearness and style: and it may be the truth that we 
can illuminate a fact or express an opinion so that the man 
who reads can see into our brain and yet, at the same time, 
not hear the whirr of the wheels. 

But we have ever tried to marry this alleged style and 
this alleged clarity to broadness, to kindness, not to bitter- 
ness. To make a pungent paragraph we have never held in- 
dividuals up to ridicule, never made them dance the tight- 
rope. On the contrary, we always preferred and do prefer 
to deal with facts, principles, with the logical, the actual, and 
not with men merely passing across the stage. 

A year ago this paper had the tremendous circulation of 
800 copies. It now has 4,400 bona fide. Its income, too, has 
increased 300 per cent. We have been busy building up that 
circulation, busy spending most of that income to secure those 
4,400 readers — and more. And therefore we have no time 
now, and no inclination either, to write page after page about 
the will-be or the might-have-been. We want to lift that 
4,400 to 10,000. 

And this, the last, is the most important point of all. This 
paper is not edited or published for the fifty to seventy-five 
inside motorcycle celebrities, trade or otherwise. These 
celebrities, mostly in the trade, don't buy anything. They are 
sellers, not buyers. It is the great mass of motorcycle folks 
who absorb the stuff. And this great mass, numbering many 
thousands, are more interested in the general news of the day 
and in the practical side, than they are in the fact that Pub- 
licist Pcrcival once sold pills, or other kindred personal mat- 
ters. Nor do they very much care how Dr. Thornley, or 
former President Ovington, or this, that or the other man 
bore himself in the Indianapolis fracas, if so one-sided a 



matter could be called a fracas. What these men want is not 
personal scorn, but kinks, news, photographs, wrinkles, stories. 
And that is why Mototcycle Illustrated, which gives them 
this variety, is read by thousands of riders all over the country. 
So it is up to the trade insiders not to be deceived, not to 
be mislead. What they are looking for is to sell their product 
all over the country, from ocean to ocean, from the Canadian 
border down to the toe of Florida. And therefore, Mr. In- 
sider, it is not the paper that personally pleases you or airs 
your pet theory that is necessarily your best medium. On the 
contrary, it is the paper which pleases thousands, and not a 
few insiders, that sells the stuff. 

FROM THE LONE STAR STATE. 

WE print in this issue a howl from Texas. Although we 
use the word howl, it is not quite that; rather merely 
an earnest plea on the part of a motorcyclist who is also an 
agent His plea is for machines that will stand Texas use. 
It is well known to many that Texas is not honeycombed 
with fine park systems and billiard-table roads. As a rule 
the motorcycle has a rough proposition down there, and the 
great need in that state is motorcycles with weight and 
strength, as opposed to machines dedicated to speed and light- 
ness. But the need for strong machines is also felt in many 
other states. Among the motorcycle makers to-day many 
keep this need for the durable machine as the supreme mark 
at which they are always aiming. Our correspondent is in 
error if he believes that the makers are not fully posted 
on what is needed for rough, all-round country service. But 
he must remember that the trade is a new, young trade and 
that, like Rome, it cannot attain full growth in a day. Each 
year the manufacture of motorcycles has shown marked im- 
provement. As firms keep on making money they are in a 
better position to employ the best talent in the designing 
room, in the factory and elsewhere. Most of them are slowly 
but surely gaining strength, and in time they will be able to 
offer a line of machines suitable for any man and any country. 
# Jt 

ABATING THE CUT-OUT NUISANCE. 

WHILE president of the F. A. M., Mr. Earle L. Oving- 
ton made an effort to have introduced into the Board 
of Alderman of the City of New York, an ordinance pro- 
hibiting the use of machines without mufflers or of muffler 
cut-outs within the city limits. Mr. Samuel Marx, Alder- 
man of the 33rd District, has offered his help in the premises, 
and will present such an ordinance in the very near future. 
The matter has been turned over to Mr. Dwight Patterson, 
Chairman of the F. A. M. Legal Committee, and the pros- 
pects of the passage of the ordinance, which will establish a 
very healthy precedent, are excellent. 

It is very gratifying to see a city like New York take the 
initiative in this matter. Of course, such ordinances are 
thoroughly popular, and there is not likely to be any opposi- 
sion to its passage by the governing body of the metropolis. 
On the other hand, anti-noise provisions of this character 
safeguard against that sort of criticism which is bound to 
follow where mufflers are not attached to machines or where 
cutouts are too freely used in crowded city streets. 
.* Jt 
Death lurks in the offing of reckless road driving. 
What is the sense of endangering your safety in an en- 
deavor merely to satisfy a speed mania. As a matter of 
fact the time-killer is invariably insatiable. Avoid contract- 
ing the disease. 

By the way, treat your motor with decency. Don't ex- 
pect to secure magnificent results unless you invest at 
least some attention in your mount. 
& Jt 

Once more, be considerate of other folks. Don't rile 
their prejudices by excessive speeding and the indiscrimi- 
nate use of your muffler cut-out. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 




POUR MORE FOR BERNARD. 



MISS GRACE HOWARD, of Verona, sister of Benjamin 
F. Howard, M. M. agent, Newark, though only fifteen 
years old, is an anient rider of an M. M. Special. She is 
not satisfied with short rides, but has covered as much as 
150 miles in one day. She has been on a good many of the 
club runs to different points in New Jersey, and has had no 
trouble in negotiating any kind of road, even the Green Pond 
Hill, a very hard and rough ascent, which old-timers admit 
to be an exceedingly difficult one to mount. 



GALES BURG, Illinois.— Harvey Bernard and his Harley- 
Davidson were the stellar attraction at the race meet 
held here on Thursday last. The Milwaukee crack sent his 
machine over the course in record time and secured first 
place in four events, that is, in every race in which he 
was entered In addition to this, Bernard negotiated the 
fastest mile ever made on the Galesburg track, traveling the 
distance in 1 :02 1 / 2 on a single cylinder in the 30 :50 class. 
Not only did the Harley-Davidson capture the races won 
by Bernard, but the Milwaukee machine, ridden by Boyer 
in the five-mile private owner race and by Gabrielson in the 
ten-mile private owner, secured first place in these events also. 
The summaries: 

Five-Mile Private Owners. — Boyer (Harley-Davidson), 
Galesburg, first; Serank (Harley-Davidson), Galesburg), sec- 
ond; Seacord (Excelsior), Galesburg, third. Time, 6:57^. 

Ten-Mile Handicap. — Bernard (Harley-Davidson), Milwau- 
kee, first; Boyer (Harley-Davidson), Galesburg, second; 
Barrett (Harley-Davidson), Galesburg, third. Time, 12:29. 

Ten-Mile Private Owners. — Gabrielson (Harley-Davidson), 
Galesburg, first; Seacord, (Excelsior), Galesburg, second; 
Sehank (Harley- Davidson), Galesburg, third. Time, 15:18 

Five-Mile Handicap. — Bernard (Harley-Davidson), Mil- 
waukee, first; Boyer (Harley-Davidson), Galesburg, second; 
Gabrielson (Harley-Davidson), Galesburg, third. Time, 5:33. 

Fifteen-Mile Handicap. — Bernard (Harley-Davidson), Mil- 
waukee, first; Gabrielson (Harley-Davidson), Galesburg, sec- 
ond; Seacord (Excelsior), Galesburg, third. Time. 16:32^. 

Twenty-five-Mile Handicap. — Bernard (Harley-Davidson), 
Milwaukee, first; Seacord (Excelsior), Galesburg, second; 
Boyer (Harley-Davidson), Galesburg, third. Time, 27:34. 
& J* 

A MEETING of the Long Island Motorcycle Club, newly 
organized, will be held Thursday evening at its tem- 
porary quarters, y; Vernon avenue, Long Island City. Any- 
one wishing to join should communicate with or call on Ar- 
thur C. Klage, 37 Vernon avenue, Long Island City, N. Y. 
J* * 

BEAUMONT, Texas. — A club is in progress of forma- 
tion here. Its leading spirit is H. Cunningham, the 
local Thor agent, who reports that the sport is fast gaining 
favor in the Lone Star State. 



In working out the average of the Reliance Motorcycle in 
the V. A. M. Endurance Run, we omitted one score, and 
credited them with the percentage of only 52 per cent., when 
it should have been 77 per cent. The showing of this machine 
would have been even better, had it not been that the rules 
were misunderstood by one of the Reliance riders, he having 
failed to arrive at Columbus within the limited time, owing to 
being held up at the Coshocton control for forty-five minutes, 
because of his being out of gasoline. Had he known that he 
could have secured the signatures of some of the citizens of 
Coshocton certifying that he had gone through that place, he 
would have been able to finish the run, and thus bring the per- 
centage some fifteen or twenty points higher than it really was. 
S J* 

A rather striking feature of the record breaking perform- 
ances incident of Graves' ride of one hundred miles in 
eighty-seven minutes, at Los Angeles recently, was the 
fact that not only the winner, but also Ward, Kohl and 
Knappe, who rode second, third and fourth, respectively, 
were all mounted on machines equipped with Morgan & 
Wright tires. 

•H <* 

Morgan and Wright announce that their Los Angeles 
branch has been removed from 118-122 East Tenth street to 



more commodious quarters at 1108 South Main street, where 
the branch will have better facilities for taking care of the 
trade. 

& J* 

The Hendee Manufacturing Company has decided to 
make the Bosch Magneto the standard equipment for its 
entire line. Battery ignition will not be used on any of the 
1910 Indian models. 

<* J* 

J. W. Grant, of the Troxel Manufacturing Company, 
Elyria, O., has returned from his trip to the Pacific Coast. 
This was his second journey, and he reports that he has 
doubled the business done on the first trip. 
•H * 

Mr. W. G. Schack, general manager of the Emblem 
Manufacturing Company, of Angola, N. Y., is on the Pa- 
cific Coast closing agency contracts for 1910. 

* jt 

Le Roy Cook, formerly editor of Motorcycle Illustrated, 
has joined the American Motor Company as its advertising 
manager. Mr. Cook is the new secretary of the F. A. M. 

* & 

Newark, N. J.— M. H. Potter has taken on the Royal 
Pioneer agency. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



17 



VALUABLE PRIZES AT LOWELL. 



A "KILLING" FOR EVANS. 



THE biggest event of the year, as far as racing in the 
eastern portion of the country is concerned, will be the 
series of motorcycle events which will constitute a part of the 
Lowell Motor Carnival, to be held Labor Day week. The 
motorcycle events will take place September io from ten 
o'clock until four in the afternoon. There will be six events, 
as follows: 

Flying mile trial for Speed King Trophy, valued at $50; 
entry fee $5. Twenty-one mile race (two laps) limited to 
private owners with machines in the 55 class, having no 
auxiliary exhaust ports. The first, second and third prizes 
have a cash value of $50; entry fee $5. One lap (10.6 miles) 
open. First, second and third prizes have an actual cash 
value of $50; entry fee $5. Two-lap professional race. First 
prize, $100; second prize, $50, and third prize, $25; entry fee, 
$10. Two-mile races for machines in the 30^ class; prizes 
to the value of $50; entry fee, $5. One hundred-mile race for 
the Lowell Automobile Club Trophy; entry fee, $10. 

Entries should be sent to the Lowell Automobile Club, 
Lowell, Mass., or to Earle L Ovington, at 2234 Broadway, 
New York City, who will be referee. The prizes are among 
the finest, if not the very best, ever competed for by motor- 
cyclists. Every cup is of sterling silver, of the highest 
quality and handsomely designed. In fact, the attraction in the 
way of prizes is so great that there will be undoubtedly one of 
the largest lists of starters who have ever competed in a 
motorcycle .meet in the New England States. 

JACK PRTNCE is now on the lookout for a track site in 
the vicinity of New York. He has Brooklyn, Jersey 
City and Newark in view. He has not yet decided just where 
he will build, but the prospects are that he will construct a 
half-mile board track, upon which a hundred miles an hour 
will be an easy proposition. The structure will be ready for 
opening early next spring. 

Prince is also closing arrangements for a track, similar 
to the Springfield structure, to be built at Providence, Rhode 
Island, and for another at San Francisco. With these tracks 
in operation, the energetic promoter will have two circuits, on 
the Pacific and Atlantic coast, respectively. The Western 
season opens in November and comes to a close in April 
or May, at which time weather conditions are right for the 
inauguration of the Eastern circuit. In other words, Prince 
contemplates having racing all the year around. 

DENVER. — Five thousand people crowded the rim of the 
saucer track at the Tuileries a week ago Sunday and 
saw one of the greatest motor races ever run in Denver. Every 
foot of the distance, fifteen miles, was hotly contested by 
Boyd, Armstrong and Wolters, and the crowd went crazy with 
excitement. Wolters, who was running third, while going at a 
speed of forty-five miles an hour took a header, the machine 
turning a complete somersault, Wolters going with it. The 
officials ran to his assistance, to find him up, dragging his 
machine to the outside and calling for another. He mounted 
and continued the race, giving an exhibition of nerve which 
brought thunders of applause from the spectators. Boyd 
won, Armstrong was second, and Wolters third ; time, 20.09^- 
J* J* 

FC. ROY, of Rochester. N. Y., who for some time has 
• been striving to interest local capitalists in the erection 
of a track here, has succeeded to such an extent that plans 
have been prepared for a three-lap track, as part of a 
stadium on St. Paul street boulevard. The track will be 
built by the Stadium Amusement Company, with R. S. Price 
as president, and Mr. Roy secretary and general manager. The 
stadium will be completed in time for the opening of the 
iqio season. 




Lee Evans (in Center of Picture). 

IN addition to securing a perfect score in the A. C. U. Six 
Days' Trials, in England, the Indian has otherwise en- 
gaged the interest of British riders. At Brocklands. in the 
time trials, G. Lee Evans made the best record in his class, 
64.702 miles an hour. In the August handicap at Brooklands, 
Evans finished first from scratch, the machines competing 
running up to 734 C. C. against the Indian's 638 C. C. In 
the senior handicap for machines not exceeding 1,000 C. C, the 
Indian also won. Again, in the second roadster handicap, 
the Indian, fully equipped, and still retaining the seals 
carried by it in the 6 days' trial, secured an easy victory. 

These winnings entitled it to enter in the winners' handi- 
cap, the Indian being the only motorcycle to gain this privi- 
lege. Its competitors were Napier automobiles of 59 and 39 
horsepower, and another machine of 20 horsepower. This 
race was won handily by Evans. A notable feature of all 
these events was the regularity of the speed of the machine, 
a stock 5 horse twin, for in the first three races it made 6oJ^ 
miles an hour, and in the last, 6o^J miles. 
** J* 

TWO of the F. A. M. championships, postponed on account 
of the Indianapolis Speedway fiasco, will be competed for 
in Springfield on the one-third mile board track* Labor Day. 
The two events are the two-mile and one-hour races, re- 
spectively, and Jack Prince, manager of the track, is confident 
that the entry list will be large and the sport wonderfully 
interesting. It is probable that the other championship, the 
five-mile, will be run off in Milwaukee some time in October. 

Another big feature of the Springfield meet on Labor Day 
will be a series of match races, distance five miles, best two out 
of three, between Jake De Rosier, who has practically re- 
covered from his Indianapolis accident, and Eddie Lingen- 
felder, who defeated the Springfield man in the ten-mile pro- 
fessional. Both Lingenfelder and De Rosier are now in 
Springfield, the former already practicing and the latter al- 
most ready to don his racing togs and mount his machine 
again. Both men are sure of their ability to win, and it is 
needless to add that the competition between them will be 
extremely exciting. 

In addition to these three events, the Springfield Labor 
Day card will contain one or two races for trade riders, one 
or two for private owners and a novice event, thus making one 
of the finest programs of the season. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



GOERKE, ON A DIRT TRACK, RIDES A MILE IN FORTY-FIVE SECONDS. 



ON the North Wildwood Speedway the Philadelphia Motor- 
cycle Trades Association held its first annual race meet 
under ideal weather conditions on August 20th. The most 
noteworthy performance was a mile against time by Goerke, 
of Brooklyn, on his seven-horse-power Indian in 45 seconds, 
which establishes a record for the track. Seymour, of Los 
Angeles, made second best time, 47 seconds. 

Event No. 1, a one-mile novice dash for singles, was won 
by Wcis on a Reading Standard, who defeated Keating and 
Lehman on Harley Davidsons. 

The obstacle race, in which contestants -were compelled 
to steer zigzag courses between barrels without knocking 
them over, was interesting. Stanley Kellog, of New York, 
who holds the mile record at the Point Breeze track, won in 
twenty seconds. The summaries : — 

One mile novice, $o l / 2 class — First prize (gold watch), A. 
Weis, 3-horse-power Reading Standard; second, J. Keating, 
4-horse-power Harley-Davidson ; third, Lehman, 4-horse- 
power Harley Davidson. Time 1 minute 16 3-5 seconds. 

One mile, 23 class — First (gold watch), Raymond Seymour, 
3-horse-power Reading Standard; second (gold cuff links), 
H. Klebes, 3-horse-power Reading Standard. Time, 1 min- 
uate, 13 seconds. 

One mile, 30^ class—First (diamond ring), Walter Goerke, 



4-horsepower Indian; second, Raymond Seymour, 4 horse- 
power Reading Standard; third, Stanley Kellog, 4 horse- 
power Merkel. Time, 1 minute 8 2-5 seconds. Seymour was 
only 20 feet behind at the finish. 

Obstacle race, speed not less than 15 miles an hour — First, 
Stanley Kellogg, Merkel; second, A. Wicknick, Indian. Time 
20 secomis. 

One mile, 48% class — First (gold watch), Harry Klebes, of 
Philadelphia, 6-horsepower Reading Standard; second Walter 
Goerke, of Brooklyn, 6-horsepower Indian; third, Raymond 
Seymour, of Los Angeles, 6-horsepower Reading Standard. 
Time, 1 minute 1 second. Goerke had a bad start and lost 
by about 50 feet. 

One mile, 61 class— First (diamond ring), Goerke, 7-horse- 
power Indian; second (scarfpin), Kellogg, 7-horsepower Mer- 
kel; third, Klebes, 7-horsepower Reading Standard. Time, 
57 2-5 seconds. This race was close throughout, Kellogg being 
beaten by not more than five feet. 

One mile time trials, two trials allowed, flying start — First 
(diamond ring), W. Goerke, 7-horsepower Indian, time, 45 
seconds; second, R. Seymour, 7-horsepower Reading Stan- 
dard, time, 47 seconds; third, S. Kellogg, 7-horsepower Mer- 
kle, time 483-5 seconds; fourth, Klebes, 7-horsepower Read- 
ing Standard, time 52 3-5 seconds. 



THERE will be a big time* at Wichita, Kansas, on Labor 
day. In the morning, two hundred riders are expected 
to participate in a parade, and races will be conducted in the 
afternoon. Ray Hockaday, of the Hockaday Motorcycle Com- 
pany, announces that a number of Topeka riders from the 
capital city have entered the races and will be strong con- 
tenders for championship honors. Arrangements have been 
made to remove the sand on the turns of the track and to 
sprinkle the speedway. The races have been sanctioned by 
the Federation. jg jg 

SAN FRANCISCO. — A twenty-four-hour endurance run 
will probably be the next important event conducted by 
the San Francisco club. The matter was brought up at the last 
meeting of the club, and has been left in the hands of the 
racing committee. The contest will be held over the San 
Leandro triangle on September 5 and 6. 

On Sunday, August 15, the club members held their semi- 
monthly run to Tocaloma in conjunction with the Oakland 
motorists. A number of women made this trip, riding tandem. 

THE Bicycle and Motorcycle Dealers' Association of 
Topeka. Kansas, is making arrangements for the 
races which will be held on the first day of the big State 
fair. September 13. More than two hundred and fifty dol- 
lars worth of prizes will be offered and there will probably 
be ten events. ^ ^ 

THE Elizabeth City Motorcycle Club will hold a race meet 
September 11, Entries should be forwarded to A. B. 
Houtz. secretary. 1 1.2 X. Road street. Elizabeth City. X. C 



BEAUMONT, Tex. — Plans for holding a series of races 
here Monday, Sept. 6, are progressing satisfactorily 
and the promoters are much encouraged over the pros- 
pects. The course is the county shell road from Beaumont 
to Port Arthur, and handicaps are to be so distributed as 
to give all the entries a fair chance. There will be from 
six to eight events. The races are free to all, and no entry 
fee will be required. The committee requests that all 
entries be made to H. Cunningham at the Chicago Auto 
Company, Heisig Building, Pearl and Washington streets. 
J* Jl 

TWO motorcycle races were held at Cheyenne, Wyo., on the 
17th. The twelve-mile event, for Cheyenne riders only, 
was won by Dick Anderson on a 3^ Excelsior; V. L. Curtis, 
5 Indian, second; John Huth, s l A Yale, third. Time 20:45. 
The twenty-five mile free-for-all was won by Glenn Boyd, 5 
Indian, in 26:32; E. Lyttle, 7 R.-S., was second, and E. W. 
Armstrong, 4 Excelsior, third. Boyd's riding won the acclaim 
of the crowd, for the track had not yet been smoothed by 
the passage of heavy cars, and the speeding motorcycles per- 
formed some long distance leaping stunts that kept the 
spectators on their feet. 

JC J* 

IX our August 15 account of the Indianapolis Speedway 
races, we stated that Huyck rode from scratch in the 
sixth event, a five mile handicap for machines not exceeding 
61 cubic inches piston displacement. This was not correct. 
Huyck had 52 seconds handicap. The scratch men were 
Balke and Turner, both of whom rode Merkels, and who 
secured second and third places, respectively. 




This group of pictures cives one an idea ot the interest taken in motorcycle racing in the Northwest The photos, 
showing the progress oi a five-mile race, were taken at Wausau. Wis., a few weeks ago. The race, as were two others 
the same dav. \va< won hv John Sohwister on a Harlev-Davidson. 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



19 



RACE MEETS— RECENT AND PROSPECTIVE 



CINCINNATI. — On a half mile track, in poor condition, 
three races were held here Sunday, the 22nd. The best 
riding was done by Henry Rowland, on a twin Thor, who, 
although paralysed in the right arm, succeeded in winning the 
ten mile for twins and the fifteen mile open handicap. The 
summaries : — 

Ten Mile Handicap for Singles— First, R. W. Lucas (Indi- 
an) ; second, Henry Bleh (R.-S.) ; third, Henry Neider- 
schmidt (Harley Davidson) ; time 14.13. 

Ten Mije Handicap for Twins — First, Henry Rowland 
(Thor) ; second, John Bleh (Merkel) ; third, Fred Peacock 
(Pierce) ; time 13.10. 

Fifteen Mile Open Handicap — First, Henry Rowland 
(Thor); second, John Bleh (Merkel); third, R. W. Lucas 
(Indian); time 23.10. 

Jl Jl 

ATLANTIC City, N. J., is to have a big automobile track 
if the projected plans do not fail of materialization. A 
company has been formed to handle the undertaking, which 
will include other sports in addition to automobiling. It is 
proposed to erect a course which will be two miles in cir- 
cumference, at Chelsea Heights, near Atlantic City. The 
track will be elliptical in shape, and in the center will be 
grounds for athletic sports, football and baseball games. It 
is estimated that $800,000 will be expended in preparing the 
grounds. The track will be 125 feet wide on the banked 
turns and 150 feet in width on the stretches. It will be built 
on a concrete foundation and a grand stand capable of ac- 
commodating 25,000 persons will be built. It is hoped to 
open the track by next spring. 




A. L. Kirk (Minneapolis Two-Speed), Winner at F. A. M. 
Race Meet at Indianapolis. 

SAVANNAH, Ga., August 8.— According to the local report 
the races scheduled to be run on Tybee Beach on August 
7, were more or less of a fizzle. The races had been poorly 
advertised, and altogether the affair seemed to be run in a 
go-as-you-please order. Despite these drawbacks a crowd of 
people lined the course and saw the few races which were 
run, the results being as follows : One Mile.— Won by R. H. 
Ward; 2, J. A. Adams, Jr.; 3, W. Smith, all riding Excel- 
siors. One Mile Open.— Won by Adams; J. Howard Eve, 
second, and Ward third. Adams won the third and last event, 
with Eve second and McCone third. The crowd waited pa- 
tiently for a thriller, but it never came. 
Jl Jl 

PERRY Wessel, of Moline, Ala., riding an Excelsior, won 
the ten-mile race at the Rock Island exposition recently. 
Second place went to H Priester of Davenport, who rode a 
Torpedo, and Roy Collins, of Rock Island, was third on an 
Indian. J. M. Meyers, of Davenport, rode a five-mile exhi- 
bition on an Excelsior, his time being 7:26 3-5. 




FL. HUNT, of Rochester, N. Y., who secured a perfect 
• score on a four-cylinder Pierce in the National 
Endurance Run, had never ridden in any event of that 
character before. The fact that he had no trouble what- 
soever throughout the entire 385 miles speaks volumes 
for the reliability of the machine and the skill of the 
rider - jl jl 

A RACE meet will be held under the auspices of the 
North Wildwood Automobile Club on the Speedway, 
North Wildwood, N. J., Monday, September 6. The follow- 
ing is the list of motorcycle events: One mile, thirty and a 
a half class ; first prize valued at $20, second at $10, third at 
$5. One mile, forty-eight and a half class; first prize valued 
at $20, second at $10, third at $5. One male, sixty-one class; 
first prize valued at $20, second at $10, third at $5. One mile 
time trial — two trials allowed; prize valued at $35. The en- 
trance fee is $1. for each event, and the entries are in charge 
of W. C. Rhodes, 19th and Oxford streets, Philadelphia. 

BETWEEN thirty and forty riders are expected to compete 
in the races which will be held at the State Fair at 
Syracuse, N. Y., September 18. Three trophies have been an- 
nounced by C. Arthur Benjamin, chairman of the automobile 
races at the State Fair. The Syracuse Club has appointed a 
racing board, consisting of A. V. Brewster, chairman ; Captain 
Fenner, second lieutenant; Adams, vice-president; Sparks and 
Allen Groves. Perce Adams has been elected second lieutenant 
to fill a vacancy. F. E. Scoville, N. F. MacLyman, H. F. 
Grover, Orin Stevens, William Manders, C. Lester Saul and 
Max Rosenbloom were recently elected to membership. 
Jl Jl 
T. PAUL— The hill climb held by the St. Paul and Min- 
neapolis Motorcycle Club on Davern Hill the afternoon 
of the 15th was well contested, there being thirty entries. F. 
S. Haas, the St. Paul rider, gave a wonderful exhibition of 
riding, capturing first prizes, gold medals, in both the twin 
and single classes. 

The second prizes, silver medals, were awarded to H. Ham- 
mer, single cylinder; A. Bedson, twin cylinder. Best time, 
single cylinder, -.19; twin cylinder, :i6. 

The next event conducted by the club will be a road race, 
and following this will be the state fair races, automobile day, 
Sept 11. jl Jl 

ON Saturday Aug. 14, the Rochester Club held three events 
for members only on the Scottsville Road over a course 
of ioy 2 miles. The first race, a free for all, was* , won by H. 
Stauder (3I6 Indian) ; second, Mertz (6 Thor) ; third, Can- 
non (Harley-Davidson). The second event wa& a handicap 
race, won by C. B. Forsyth, on the Merkel, scratch. The third 
race, for doubles, also proved easy for Forsyth. _ 



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September 1. 19C9. 



rlAJVCflS 



A FIVE HORSE SINGLE 

QVI'I E a littie attentirn from the riders on the endur- 
ance run was attracted by the Kiefler, manufactured 
in a small way by the Kiefler Motor Works, 184 Broadway, 
Buffalo, X. Y. The 1909J/2 Model is a simplification of 
last season's machine. It is notable in that it is the largest 
single cylinder in the country, having a 2>Ya x 4 engine, de- 
veloping five horse power. Transmission is by chain belt, 
there being an adjustable idler with a lever for releasing 
it. Instead of having the usual type of carbureter, this 
machine is equipped with a mixing valve, manufactured by 
the Kiefer folks. The valves and oiling devices ane auto- 
matic, and the control by means of friction lever. The 
gasoline tank holds a half gallon and the oil tank three 
pints. The ignition is by battery, of which there are two. 
The frame is double, equipped with extra long handle 
bars, while the saddle is one of the Mesinger type. The 
machine is equipped with a band brake, manufactured by 
the builders. It sells for $220. 

Among those who made the A. C. U. Six Day Reliability 
run in England recently, was F. C. Wood, of London, who 
rode an X. S. U The trials were run under exceptionally 
bad conditions, as rain fell almost continually. The per- 
formance of the X. S. U. is especially notable in view of 
the fact that the machine, a 4-h.p. Model de Luxe, had 
been purchased by Mr. Wood only two days before the 
commencement of the trials; it was a stock model, taken 
from the window. This machine was equipped with the 
N. S. U. two-speed gear and free engine, which enabled 
Mr. Wood to do exceptionally well on steep hills and ir 
deep sand. 

J. W. Dickenson, of New Britain, Conn., has invented 
a luggage carrier, which he declares to be a very con- 
venient and advantageous equipment. As is plain from the 
illustration, the carrier is very roomy and at the same time 
rigidly attached to the mud guard and rear hub. This 
accessory is made exclusively to fit 1909 Indians. It can 
be attached in ten minutes. It is made of cold rolled steel 
and so large as to admit of the carrying of an ordinary 
parcel or even a suit case. The carrier, with two heavy 
straps, is sold for $2.75. Mr. Dickenson's address in Xew 
Britain is 36 Pearl Court. 




THE MARVEI^-A NEW ONE 

AMOXG the machines competing for the first time in 
an endurance run was the Marvel, made by the Mar- 
vel Manufacturing Company, newly organized at Ham- 
mondsport, N. Y. Both the single and the double have 
mechanical intake valves. The cylinder, in one piece, is 
of the offset type, with the valve in the head. The ignition 
is by both magneto and battery, and transmission by V 
belt. The frame is the same as the Weyman Model, and 
spring forks, on the Sager principle, are part of the equip- 
ment. The bore of the cylinder is 3% inches, and the 
stroke 3 11/16 inches, the capacity of the single being $o l / 2 
cubic inches. 

The site of Morgan & Wright's huge tire and rubber goods 
plant, on the banks of the beautiful Detroit River, is, from 
the standpoint of scenery, light, air and water supply, prob- 
ably the finest in the country. From a practical standpoint, 
it is interesting to note that the steam presses in which the 
tires are cured are so ponderous that it was necessary to go 
down to bed-rock to get a proper foundation for them. As 
the excavations proceeded below the level of the river, water 
cozed through into shafts in such volume that it was nec- 
essary to install a big centrifugal pump and run it night and 
day to permit continuing the operations. Even then, the 
men were compelled to work up to their waists in water 
most of the time. In spite of these difficulties, it is expected 
that the new equipment will be ready for operation in a few 
weeks. 

& Jt 

Houston, Tex. — Austin Burgess, who has the Excelsior 
agency throughout this territory, reports a bright outlook 
for the coming season. "The fact that there are not more 
motorcycles in and about Houston already," he states, "is 
remarkable in itself, and I look tor the demand to almost 
equal that now enjoyed by the automobile in the near 
future, now that the ice is being broken by the recent sales, 
including those made to the city government. Waco, a 
town of some 30,000 inhabitants, at this time possesses 
nearly as many motorcycles as automobiles, which does 
not mean that Waco is not long on the latter. In Waco 
motorcycles are replacing the bicycle as a mount for the 
telegraph and messenger boy, and for the business man 
better types are coming into use in preference to horse 
and buggy and the more expensive motor cars." 
Jl Jl 

The Hendee Manufacturing Company has made an im- 
portant change in Chicago, having placed P. B. Whitney 
in charge of its Western branch office. Whitney is con- 
fidently of the opinion that the number of machines in 
use in and about Chicago will be doubled next year. He 
says: "People are just beginning to wake up to the busi- 
ness as well as the pleasure phases of the two-wheel ma- 
chine, and everywhere in the country officials of industrial 
concerns are making inquiries, and I anticipate a tremen- 
dous business for the coming year." 
J* J* 

Penacook, N. H.— The Hoyt Electrical Instrument 
Works have bought a piece of land, fronting 100 feet on 
Main street here, which forms part of the Central Trunk 
Boulevard being built through the White Mountains, and 
will erect a modern fire-proof garage and salesroom, the 
widespread demand for Hoyt motors having made it nec- 
essary to devote the entire Washington street plant to 
their manufacture. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



21 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



A Page. 

Aurora Automatic Machinery Co 36-42 

American Motor Co 29 

Auto-Bi Company 38 

American Motorcycle Co 44 

B 

Bosch Magneto Co Cover IV 

Badger Brass Mfg. Co 42 

Breeze Carbureter Co 43 

c 

Corbin Screw Corporation 35 

E 

Empire Tire Co 41 

Excelsior Supply Co 25 

Eclipse Machine Co 40 

Emblem Mfg. Co 36 

F 

F. A. M 43 

G 

G & J Tire Co 28, 41 

Grossman Co., Emil 21 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 29 

Goodrich Co.. B. F Cover III 



H Page. 

Harley-Davidson Motor Co 40 

Ilendce Manufacturing Co.... Front Cover 

Hornecker Motor Mfg. Co 37 

Hansen Mfg. Co.. O. C 43 

Herring-Curtiss Co 30 

Herz & Co 38 

J 

Jeffery Dewitt Co 30 

Jones Speedometer Co 37 

Jenkins, Geo. P 44 

K 

Keller & Risque Motor Co 21 

Kokomo Rubber Co 3 j 

L 

Lyons Motor Co., Geo. V 31 

M 

Morgan & Wright 2223 

Merkel-Light Motor Co 27 

Mesinger Mfg. Co., H. & F 41 

McLaughlin & Ashley 44 

Motorcycle Equipment Co 43 

Mart, The 31 

N 

New Departure Mfg. Co 32 

N. S. U. Motor Co 3944 

New Era Gas Engine Co 43 



O Page 

Oviigton Motor Co 31 

P 

Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory 31 

Prospect Motor Co 44 

Prest-O-Lite Co 34 

Pittsfield Spark Coil Co 34 

R 

Reading Standard Co Cover II 

Rose Mfg. Co 43 

Reliance Motor Cycle Co 35 

s 

Splitdorf, C. F 41 

Shaw Mfg. Co 43 

Standard Thermometer Co 41 

T 

Tingley & Co., Chas. 44 

Thiem Mfg. Co 44 

Tiger Cycle Works Co 44 

V 

Yeeder Mfg. Co 42 

w 

Whipple, I. H 21 

Widmayer Co., F. B 43 



Morgan and Wright announce a change in their Atlanta 
branch location. They have just taken possession of the 
premises at 50 North Pryor street. Mr. Herbert Starnes will 
succeed the Alexander-Seewald Company as manager. Mr. 
Starnes is one of the company's oldest employees and has 
acted as its Southern representative in the States of Ken- 
tucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama for several years 
past 



'WHIPPLE The Motorcycle Man 

The best in the world is none too good for our customers. 
Motorcycles and accessories at lowest prices. Pierce 4 cylinder, 
$350; Indians, nine models, $175 to $325. Good second hand, 
all kinds, down to $40. Send for our sundry catalog. 

WHIPPf m? THE MOTORCYCLE MAN 
▼▼***** *-^ ** 260 W. Jack.on Blvd., CHICAGO 




MERIT MADE 
A BUY WORD 

arm mis M\vnrrtt who MUST have 
a spnrk plug that has long life, 
remains clean, and whose porce- 
lain will not crack from heat. 

All Sizes #1 ftf| Porcelain 
All Slyles *f 1 - uu ornico 

Send for Catalog M.I. 

Emil Grossman Company 

ManufitHtirrr 

232 West 58th St., New York 

CHICAGO DETROIT: 

U'*6 Michigan Ave. 874 Woodward Ave. 




THE OWNER - MOTORCYCLE "Z> TRADE-MARK 

Has the satisfaction of knowing and knowing that 
his friends know he is riding a machine of superiority 

THE AGENT* "TOURIST" TWO-SPEED MOTORCYCLES 

not only deal* with the "rider who knows.'* but has the satisfaction of know- 
ing that ha can make deliveries when promised, for we will appoint only 
such number of agents whose repeat orders we can take care or promptly 
Our Litmraturm and Agency Proposition will in feres f yoa 

W1C 1 Iff PnCCIRI V tor us to handle all of the attaching of "K at R" TWO- 
lO irorUOaiDLE, SPEED CONVERSION SETS at our works and we wish to ar- 
range with repairmen in all parts of the country for doing the work— we get the busi- 
ness, send the set to you for attaching to frame and pay you well for doing the work. 

Sond for our Catalogue— "K A R" CONVERSION SETS, and 
handle our Two-Spmmd Hub* as a money-making »idm tin* 

KELLER 6 RISQUE MOTOR CO., St. Paul, Minn. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



© 



«* 






JOHfirt 




In the only Championship event i 

riders of the 

MORGAN & mm 



T 



Took 1st, % 

HE io-mile professional race was won by Lingel 
felder on M. & W. tires. DeRosier unfortunate] 
buckled his front wheel and fell. His Morgan { 

Wright tires, however, were in perfect condition and wei 

not responsible for his accident. 

The results of these two races — the only important races of the day — justify the statement tW 
100% of the fast machines at the meet were equipped with Morgan & Wright Tires. 

Look at the Summary : 

Event No. i— M. & W. tires ist. 

Event No. 2— (F. A. M. Championship) M. & W. tires ist, 2nd and 3rd. 
Event No. 3— (Local Club race) 1st, 2nd and 3rd places went to two competing makes of tire 
Event No. 4— Morgan & Wright tires 2nd. 

Event No. 5— (Professional) Morgan & Wright tires ist. No 2nd on account of acciden 
Event No. 6— Morgan & Wright tires 2nd and 3rd. 

Event No. 7— Championship. (Run after practically all the best riders had withdrawn, 
Morgan & Wright tires 2nd and 3rd. 

These are wins to be proud of. Wins made when thei 
was real competition on big 5 to 7 H. P. machines ths 
show up what a tire is good for and demonstrate its maker' 
ability. Ask those who were there. 

Morgan & Wright tires won the F. A. M. Champioi 
ship in 1908, and had all the events been run off as p* 
schedule there is little doubt that they would have made 
clean sweep this year. 




MORGAN & WRK 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



23 




f at Indianapolis, in which the best 
■y competed, 

MOTORCYCLE TIRES 

d 3rd places. 



1 J'ORGAN & WRIGHT racing tires were the talk 
JY I of the meet and were the only tires that success- 
fully stood up under the terrific grind and strain 
>f the Speedway. 

There was not a machine on the track which was counted 
m to win the Championships or professional races that was not fitted with Morgan & Wright tires. 

In the big events, Morgan & Wright tires were the choice of Lingenfelder, DeRosier, Huyck, 
Balke, Kellogg, Chappie, Goerke, Seymour, Voelker, Turner, Tormey and many other good but 
ess known riders. 

These were the men who were counted on to land the coveted championships and they chose 
Morgan & Wright tires when their lives and reputations were at stake. 

Other tire makers were compelled to supply road tires, when they could, as a make-shift 
fhen their racing tires failed to stand up. Championships are seldom won on such equipment. 

The condition of the track, causing the withdrawal of the best riders whose machines were 
{quipped with Morgan & Wright tires, accounted for the winning of one or two of the events by 
llow machines on these regular road tires. 

In the endurance run, we were unfortunate in not being represented on any of the com- 
mittees, and the entries did not pass through our hands. We are proud, however, of the showing 
oaade by M. & W. tires. They showed a percent- 
age of perfect scores as high as any competing 
make and a higher percentage of machines finish- 
ing. But two casings were changed during the 
mtire run, both for bad cuts. M. & W. Butt End 
tubes were in a large proportion of competing 
asings and they stood the grind in fine shape. 



T, Detroit, Mich. 







^^^^H H^. 


\ 

V 




BUTT END TUBE 



Kii 



® 












@ 



* 
* 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 




AS a matter of fact motorcycling is in its infancy in 
Texas, and throughout the whole Southwest in gen- 
eral. This may be attributed to probably two agencies, 
but primarily to one, on which all practical riders will 
almost unanimously agree. To make a long story short, 
the entire trouble lies within the fact that the various 
manufacturers have, up to the present season, failed to 
put weight and strength into their product. They have 
all built machines much too light to be thoroughly 
adapted to Texas roads. However, this season has af- 
forded us motors that meet the demand entirely; yet at 
the same time it is very apparent that the majority of the 
manufacturers fail to grasp the one cardinal point, Dura- 
bility, losing sight of this important factor to cater to 
the speed craze, and putting on the market machines that 
are far too frail to meet the commercial demand. It 
is obvious that the majority of the motorcycle builders 
are either ignorant of the existing conditions, or that they 
do not look to this section for any great source of 
revenue. 

Now then, the motorist who may feel inclined to criti- 
cise this article on general principles, must remember that 
in this country we do not have mile after mile of boule- 
vards and city pavements to enjoy — as is the case in the 
North and East — but must make the best of poor county 
roads, which are today practically as Nature made them. 
The "good roads" movement is in the ascendancy in this 
locality now, but at best it must be slow in attaining 
results of any consequence. 

Again, those who favor and follow racing may have 
their views of the matter as well; but let us have ma- 
chines for all demands. The manufacturer who holds 
that motorcycles are for racing purposes only, and con- 
tinues to make a light, speedy machine, need not look to 
this section for any phenomenal amount of business in 
the near future. What we must have is strength and dura- 
bility. We cannot accept the theory that "speed is 
power"; for theory is one thing and practice another. 
Racing will not come into popular favor in this section 
in the immediate future for many reasons, among which 
might be mentioned the following: Suitable courses are 
few, there are not enough followers of this particular 
sport to support regular meets, and last, though not 
least, the anti-racing sentiment is not favorably inclined 
towards anything of this sort. 

Getting back to the prime features of this article. We 
have probably two machines that have made good in 
Texas this season from a commercial standpoint. This 
is a very poor percentage when one comes to think of it, 
is it not? And what is it due to? Professional men are 
probably our largest users of motorcycles at the present 
time, M. D.'s particularly. The rural carrier is another 
good friend, and it is obvious that they must have de- 
pendable machines in all instances. Others use them for 
travel in sparsely settled districts where the railroads are 
few, a condition that is very common here. This class of 
motorcycle is rapidly coming into favor, proving superior 
to the old dub of N. G. 

Heretofore the motorcycle has been unfavorably looked 
upon in this country because of the poor opportunity that 
has been afforded it to demonstrate its actual worth and 
dependability, which was due to various reasons. Invari- 
ably the buyer is a novice, and as practical gas-engine men 
are few and far between, it is very evident to the man 



who knows what will become of the motor. Very few 
riders are competent to handle the many little difficulties 
that are incident to motoring, and invariably a break- 
down results in the delivery wagon being commissioned 
to haul in the "boat." Until the individual rider becomes 
better versed with the practical operation of the gas and 
spark, trouble and distrust will naturally follow. 

Yours truly, C. D. Peake. 

Fort Worth, Texas. 

JC J* 

The Standard Machine Question. 

Bv Observer. 

WHATEVER may be the final disposition of the rules, 
it seems that in the above heading lies the "crux" 
of the whole matter. Were amateur and trade rider alike 
to ride similar machines, we do not think that the question 
would be such a moot point. Again, there are two types of 
amateur, the one who tinkers his own machine, and the other 
with a factory at his elbow. Social status has nothing at 
all to do with the question, and, in spite of criticism to the 
contrary, we might sum the matter up by saying that motor- 
cyclists are not snobs. 

It is, generally speaking, mostly the machine, not the 
man that accounts for the winning of a hill-climb. There- 
fore the matter assumes simple proportions. Were you to 
take two noted amateurs and professional riders, give 
them two machines, exactly similar, from a dealer's stock, 
let them have an hour for tuning up in the true sense of 
the word, not with special parts or fakes, but with ordinary 
methods — who could with certainty predict the winner in a 
hill-climb or endurance run? On this basis would any 
amateur object to entering against a trade rider? I do 
not think so, as a great many seem more than willing, even 
under present conditions, which are, to say the least, 
puzzling. 

Let it be known that I am merely sitting on the fence 
at present. I presume that I am a professional, because, 
forsooth, I have met and competed against professional 
and trade riders alike, but, mark you, as an amateur, and 
I have not been absolutely unsuccessful, although I 
have had a factory at my beck and call. I have no "axe 
to grind" because I do not intend to go into competition 
again. Under certain conditions, sport such as this can 
go "mixed" and not suffer thereby. Let the trade rider, or 
amateur, ride a stock machine, devoid of fake, and with 
full touring or average riding equipment, such as mud- 
guard and muffler at least, and the mountain develops into 
a mole-hill. 

The point on which this question really turns is the stock 
machine. What is a stock machine? Just one which you 
would buy from any agent of your choice. Even though 
the manufacturer strains his utmost, he cannot get away 
from his catalogue specifications and the examples of his 
product in the hands of the riding public, and surely a 
"Missourian" committee could guard against fraud and 
fake, watch bore and stroke, valves and valve pockets, 
carbureters and standard fittings, and, mayhap, decide the 
question of what constitutes an efficient muffler? 

Is the scheme workable? Yes! Have we the "wise and 
upright judges?" We have! Then why wander in the 
woods any longer? Let all come out in the open, and a 
square deal will be the result. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



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DID THE 




Good ? 




Make 







CERTAINLY— AS USUAL 

In the F. A. M. National Endurance Run 

Five Excelsiors Started — Four Perfect Scores 

The highest proportion of any make of machine entered. Only two private 
owners to finish perfect on single cylinder machines. One of them an Excel- 
sior, ridden by L. Wipperman of Buffalo, N. Y. Note the number of other 
makes that fell by the wayside. Then draw your own comparisons. 

Excelsior Quality Makes Good Every Time. 

EXCELSIOR SUPPLY COMPANY 



233-37 Randolph Street 



Established 1876 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



STANLEY T. KELLOGG, Eastern Distributor, 2233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



SEVEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY MILES ON A NEW ERA AUTOCYCLE 



YOUR readers will probably be interested in a trip that 
the writer has made on a New Era autocycle, built 
by The New Era Gas Engine Co., of Dayton, Ohio, from 
Dayton to Omaha, a distance of 760 miles. In making this 
trip, I halted at all the cities and towns on my route, 
making stops of from one to three days at each point. 
I started from Dayton May 19 and arrived in Omaha 
July 16. The trip could have been made in much less 
time had it not been for the stops and the miserable con- 
dition of the roads through parts of Illiniois and Iowa. 
It rained almost continually from the time I left Indiana 
until I arrived in Omaha. 

After leaving Terre Haute, Indiana, my immediate ob- 
jective point was Danville, Illinois. Here I found the 
roads almost impassable. The mud at times entirely 
covered my tires, which made riding very difficult. The 
two-speed gear was the only thing that made it possible 
to pass through stretches of mud roads. You cannot 
imagine my grateful appreciation of a stretch of ten or 
fifteen miles of good road when it happened to come on 
my route, which did not occur very frequently,' especially 
through Iowa. I thought the roads were bad in Illinois, 
but in parts of Iowa they were so bad that I was com- 
pelled to resort to the railroad ties, where I rode for miles 
at a speed of about four miles an hour. 

I was not following any pike or State road, but simply 
taking a course which I had laid out in order to visit cer- 
tain towns and cities on my route. I frequently rode in 
a driving rain. It took me four days to ride from Des 
Moines, Iowa, to Omaha, which I reached July 16, though 
the rain followed me during almost my entire trip. I had 
very little trouble with the machine, and only two falls 
during the entire trip, one of which was caused in an un- 
usual way. 

I was approaching Terre Haute, when I observed ahead 
of me on the road two horses, which were loose and walk- 
ing along the road. Thought I had successfully passed 
them, when I heard a commotion at my side, and then I 
saw that one of them was making a bee line for me. Al- 



most before I was aware of the fact, he had knocked me 
off of my machine and passed over me. Fortunately he 
did not damage my autocycle to any extent, although it 
was some time before I entirely recovered from the 
shock. The owner of the horse kindly lifted me from the 
road and severely reprimanded me for being on the face 
of the earth, especially with a motorcycle. 

I had ridden the same machine some 3,000 miles before 
starting on this trip, and have had the same tires (the 
B. F. Goodrich, double clinch, Bailey tread 2%" x 28") 
from the beginning. I made no repairs of any conse- 
quence during the entire trip. 

Respectfully yours, 
jt jt L. S. MILLER. 

J A. GORDON, Tipton, Ind.— Do not fit new chains on 
• old or worn sprockets. We are always endeavoring 
to point out this error. The grinding noise of which you 
complain is undoubtedly due to the fact that the sprockets 
are worn and should both be replaced by new ones. Your 
chain is out of pitch because of this, and it will soon be 
worn out if you do not get a new set of sprockets for it 
When you have all running smoothly again, keep the 
sprockets and chain free from dust and grit, and do not be 
sparing with graphite and lubricant. Clean the chain oc- 
casionally by boiling it in paraffin wax, afterwards apply- 
ing a thick paste of vaseline and graphite mixed. Your 
experience is not uncommon; it dates back from bicycling 
days. j, ^ 

HTHOLEN & SON, Victoria, Kansas.— From a care- 
• ful diagnosis of your case we think that you will 
find that the adjustment of the jet in your carbureter is 
at fault The gasoline should come to within one thirty- 
second of an inch below the jet for the best working con- 
ditions and, as you show in your letter, the gasoline level 
is too low in your carbureter. Test this and we think that 
you will find everything O. K. We wish everyone sent in 
such clear and concise particulars as you do, as it helps us 
very much in the diagnosis. 



THE TWO-CYCLE ENGINE, FROM ANOTHER POINT OF VIEW 



IT seems to me that one of your recent contributors is mis- 
taken in stating that a two-cycle motor never gives more 
than 33 1-3% more power than do four-cvcle motors of the 
same size, and that they will not run strong more than 600 or 
700 R. P. M. Not from my own observation, but from very 
good authority, the American Simplex 2 cylinder, 2 cycle 
motor, $V 2 inch bore, showed 51 B. H. P., at 1,800 R. P. M. 
It is also claimed that Perry Okey*s two-cycle, three cylinder 
motors are strong at 3,000 R. P. M., which goes to show 
that a two-cycle motor, if properly built, is far superior to 
a four-cycle engine, all things considered. 

I have a two-cylinder motor, 354 inch bore of crudest con- 
struction, a common marine motor which I have remodeled 
a trifle. This motor will run 1,800 R. P. M. There is also 
a two-cycle motor 2^ x 2}£ inches built here, that will run 
2,500 to 3.000 R. P. M. 

Again, a speedy motor is not entirely essential for cycle 
use. Two of the smoothest running, easiest riding ma- 
chines I can recall to mind, namely, the Harley-Davidson 
and Excelsior, use a very slow speed engine. High speed 
is generally used to get power and smooth running from a 
small motor. A two-cycle motor, with proper balance, will 
give good power at a speed far below where a four-cycle 
motor will not run at all; therefore, it can be geared ac- 
cordingly to get the speed. 

As for the cooling, there are very few air-cooled automo- 
bile engines that are successfully air-cooled, especially in the 
multi-cylinder type. On the two-cycle there are twice as many 
explosions, but there are no valve chambers, valves, etc.. 



which means more iron to cool. Again, in the four-cycle, the 
incoming gases are extremely hot before they get in the 
cylinder, being heated by the hot valves. 

Immediately following ignition, the gas expands with 
the heat to the end of the stroke, when it is all forced back 
up through the cylinder again, adding additional heat to 
the cylinder head. In the two-cycle it is different The gas 
entering the cylinder is comparatively cool, first striking the 
deflector, then the cylinder head, having a tendency to cool 
the piston and cylinder. After the expansion of the gas to 
the end of the working stroke, when there is no more need 
for it, it is expelled throught the exhaust port and not back 
up through the cylinder, which undoubtedly is responsible for 
the success of the Franklin automobile. 

As for economy, the two-cycle will give more power, there- 
fore more speed on less throttle, than any four-cycle, if 
the motor is properly built and not by guess work, as most 
two-cycle motors are. A two-cycle motor cannot be built that 
way, but has to be experimented upon until the proper dimen- 
sions are found that suit the purpose for which the motor is to 
be used. The American Simplex, seven passenger, touring car 
will do better than ten miles per gallon. There is just so much 
H. P. in a drop of gasoline and no more; build a motor to use 
it all. For road service, the two-cycles have the advantages 
of simplicity, more power and less weight, and they are less 
liable to disability, owing to lack of gears, valves, springs, 
cams, etc. Only time will tell, of course, but the story will 
be an interesting one. 

Denver, Col. J. J. Wood. 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



27 



98% 





6,908 Out of a Possible 7,000 Points 

A Record Which Has No Equal in Motorcycling 

ACHIEVED BY THE MERKEL 



In the F. A. M. National Endurance Run 



Seven Started Seven Finished 

Only 92 Points Lost Out of 7,000 

A PERCENTAGE OF NINETY-EIGHT 

We're Proud of this Record— Why Shouldn't We Be? Surprised? No. There's Merit 
in the Merkel, and it Simply has to Come Out. That's All 

That Merkel Spring Frame 
Merkel Ball Bearing, Self-Oiling Motor 
Merkel Transmission and Merkel Construction 

CANT BE BEATEN. YOU CAN DEPEND ON THEM EVERY TIME 

If you are looking ahead for the best 
mororcycle or the best agency, write us 

Merkel-Light Motor Company 

POTTSTOWN, PA. 



OVINGTON MOTOR CO. 

2234 Broadway, New York. Distributors 
CATALOG ON REQUEST 




OLUER & WORTHINGTON 

1100 S. Main St., Los Anceles; 500 Golden 

Gate Are., San Francisco, Cal., Pacific 

Coast Distributors 



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28 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



OLD TIMER SIZES IT UP. 



IN a recent issue of Motorcycle Illustrated Alfred H. 
* Bartsch must have touched a sympathetic chord in the 
heart of every old-time rider of the bicycle who happened 
to read his article on the pleasures of motorcycling, as op- 
posed to mere speed and splutter. 

There can be no question of the successful future of the 
motor-driven machine for single riders, and those of us who 
rode the good old ordinary will make up a numerous brigade 
in the new army. Many of us will have to be re-converted, 
but that will happen when the almost quiet machine of sim- 
ple mechanism and moderate power begins to be seen on 
the highways. Already we see the users of high-power ma- 
chines manipulating them in crowded streets in what seems 
to be a marvelous manner. We don't quite want that sort 
of agility for ourselves ; but we are interested, and as soon as 
there is an appearance of more ease, less noise and less speed, 
depend upon it, the ranks of motorcyclists will begin to grow 
by thousands. 

In the experience of old-time riders envy will have had 
something to do with it. Several years ago, while pedaling 
my chainJess up a moderate grade on one of New Jersey's 
perfect roads I happened to be thinking of the situation — 
comparing my slowness, but comparative freedom from me- 
chanical troubles, with the ifs, ands and buts of the motor- 
cyclist — when the spluttering of a single-cylinder came up 
another grade, on a cross-road, and in a minute a man with 
gray on his temples went by. He was covering ground — 
too much of it for very calm scenic observation — but he was 
getting there Eli through a dustless section rich with pano- 
ramic views that were strong enough to be taken on the 
fly, and something in his face said he was enjoying it. 



At that time a fork-head was still breaking now and then, 
and there was a great deal of joggle-joggle. It wasn't hard 
to imagine the man with the gray temples needing a little 
3-in-i between his vertebral cartilages after a rush of fifty 
to seventy-five miles, even on first-class road surfaces. But 
that man, well past fourscore and ten, made me feel dis- 
tinctly slow, and my up-grade seemed laborious after I had 
seen him, cool and well-dressed, hum up his hill and pass 
me without an effort, lickety-split for home and supper at 
Bloomfield or Montclair, twenty miles away. 

To-day the vibration is much less. So is the noise. The 
speed, if anything, is greater on the average, but in the nat- 
ural evolution of the thing the kind of machine and the kind 
of riding Mr. Bartsch describes so alluringly will be the 
choice of many who have been thinking they are out of 
cycling for good. They will come to life again when the new 
game is a little older and more sedate in its mechanicals. 

A reading of the talk before and after the national conven- 
tion at Indianapolis is also a stimulus to renewed interest 
It carries one back to the fine old days when the L. A. W. 
itself had scarcely more than io.ooo members. New rules to- 
be submitted to fit the development of the sport — it's the 
old story over again of the simon-pure and the promateur, 
with one of the purest amateurs that ever was among the 
workers for good organization. 

There will be some interesting history written later on. 
The automobile has claimed many, but the motorcycle is the 
natural successor to the bicycle, and with the improvements 
in roads now going on there will be not only the new gen- 
eration of riders, but the frequent reunion of thousands of the 
old 'tins, under comfortable conditions. 



'HE little hexagon grip-control wrench, retailing at 15 
cents, is the handiest tool imaginable for use on the nut 



on tire valves. If you have tried a monkey wrench on this 
nut you'll be delighted with the change. 



ANOTHERGREAT VICTORY 

G&JllRES 



o 




UT of the 103 entrants in the 1909 F. A. M. Endurance and Reliability 
Contest, 69 chose G & J Tires as the safest and most reliable equip- 
ment for their machines. The tire equipment on the other 34 machines 
was distributed among six different makes — the nearest competitor having 
15 machines. 

There were 37 perfect scores made, 25 of which were made on 
G & J Tires. 

Isn't the above score sufficient proof that G & J Motorcycle Tires 
stand up the best — that they are the safest and most reliable to use? 

Get our catalog illustrating and pricing the different styles, also listing 
our complete line of valuable motorcycle accessories. 




G & J TIRE CO., Indianapolis 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



29 



The Three M.M/S in 

The F. A. M. Endurance Run 



Made an excellent showing. Below is a table that gives the 
number and make of machines that started, the number and 
the percentage of perfect scores. There are seven higher 
percentages than that of the M. M.; two are the same, and 
eight are lower. 



Perfect Percentage 

Started score. perfect. 

Curtiss i i ioo 

Torpedo ... i i ioo 

Excelsior . . 5 4 80 

Merkel 6 4 66 2/3 

H. D 7 4 57 1/10 

Indian 21 12 57 1/10 

Thor 8 3 37 1/2 

M. M 3 1 33 1/3 

Pierce 3 1 33 1/3 



Started Perfect Percentage 

score. perfect. 

New Era. ..3 1 33 1/3. 

R. S 13 4 30 5/6 

Yale 4 1 25 

Emblem ... 4 1 25 

N. S. U 6 1 162/3 

Kicfler 1 o o 

Racycle 1 o o 

Reliance ... 5 o o 

Marvel 1 o o 



We are sorry the M. M. score is not higher. It should 
have been. The machines stood the test in great shape. 
Tire troubles delayed one rider so badly that he was slightly 
over two hours late at Indianapolis. The other man did not 
finish. He was substituted for another rider at the last 
moment, without any preparation or knowledge of conditions, 
and the sand and ruts were too much for him. 

Watch the M. M. in future contests. It is made for 
all kinds of going, good, bad or indifferent. It is the machine 
you should own. Easy and comfortable, quiet and speedy, 
a splendid hill climber. 

Write for catalog. 



American Motor Company 



Brockton, Mass. 



American Motor Company 

Geo. P. Jenkins - 

L. E. French - - - 

G. M. Greene .... 

American Motor Co. of Texas - 

Lincoln Holland .... 



DISTRIBUTING STORES : 

218 Clarendon St. Boston, Mass. 

10 W. 60th St. - - . - - New York City. 

895 Main St. Buffalo, N. Y. 

Mgr. Am. Motor Co., 1536 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
M. M. Building - - - - - Dallas, Tex. 
1034 So. Main St. - - - Los Angeles, Cal. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 




SPARK PLUGS 



Of the sheath type, are 
specially constructed for 
Motorcycle work — they spark 
under all conditions and re- 
quire less battery power than 
any other plug. 

One turn of the wheel and 
your motor is in motion — 
not necessary to run your 
legs off. Never necessary to 
remove to clean as their 
unique construction prevents 
the accumulation of soot or 
carbon on the sparking point. 

Reliance Plugs will "Spark 
in Water" — that means that 
they cannot foul or short- 
circuit under any conditions. 
Soot, carbon or dampness 
has no effect. 

This plug assures you of 
longer life to itself — to your 
battery, to your coil and to 
a less strain on your mag- 
neto, at the same time giving 
a better spark and finer 
service than any other plug. 

Acknowledged everywhere 
as mechanically correct — rec- 
ords of their use prove their 
superiority and you have 
never enjoyed perfect ignition 
until you have tried Reliance 
Spark Plugs. 

Mica and porcelain backs 
in all sizes. 

JEFFERY DEWITT COMPANY 

230 HIGH ST.. REWIRE, H. J. 

S. & F. Stephenson, Agents for United Kingdom; 
io Canning PL, Liverpool, Eng. 

Armand Frey & Co., Agents for Continental Europe; 
Berlin, Germany. 



WITHIN THE FOLD 



WILLIAM O. THEIM recently made a ran from Min- 
neapolis to Sandusky, Ohio, 750 miles. He aver- 
aged 138 miles a day, on a twin-cylinder Theim. Mr 
Theim had no engine or serious tire troubles, and, barring 
a fall the second day out of Chicago, no disagreeable ex- 
periences of any kind. 

Jl Jl 

PORTLAND, Ind. — Giffe Stephenson, carrier on Rural 
Route 9, of this city, has begun the use of a motor- 
cycle on his route of 25 2-8 miles, permission to use this con- 
veyance having been received from the postomce department. 
He makes the trip in three and one-half hours. 

Jl Jl 

PHOENIX, Ariz. — Tom Armstrong has purchased a twin 
Indian with which he expects to out-distance any ma- 
chine in the valley. Superintendent Stacy, of the Indian res- 
ervation, is also a devotee of the motorcycle, and recently 
joined the ranks of the fast riders. 

Jl Jl 

NASHVILLE, Mich. — Ira Newton, mail carrier, has pur- 
chased a machine as a substitute for his famous team 
of mules that have done duty since he has been on the route. 
All carriers out of Nashville but one now deliver the mail 
by motorcycles. 

Jl Jl 

VAUN L. Hamlin, of Afton, N. Y., recently rode his 5 h. 
Indian from Pittsburg to Binghamton, N. Y. — 483 
miles — in two days. The roads were very dusty, and fifty 
miles of the trip was made through deep sand. 



The 1909 F. A. M. Endurance Run only verifies 
our claims for the CURTISS 

One Curtiss Started One Perfect Score 

PERCENTAGE 100 




Isn't this the greatest possible proof of their 
SUPERIORITY ? 
They have been consistent winners since 1903 
2 Perfect Scores - - . 1906 
DIAMOND MEDAL - - 1907 
2 Perfect Scores ... 1908 
PERFECT SCORE - - 1909 

We're now making a specialty of the Endurance 

Run Model 

7 H. P. Double Cylinder, $275.00 

3H H. P. Single Cylinder, $200.00 

Place your order now for 1 0-day delivery 

THE HERRING-QIRTISS COMPANY, HAMMONDSPORT, N. Y. 

Eastern Distributor: 

CUKTISS MOTORCYCLE CO., 1208 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, K.T. 

Pacific Coast Distributor: 

GEO. A. FAULKNER, 351 12th St., Oakland, Cal. 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



31 



MOTORCYCLE MART— IT SELLS THE STUFF 
Buy; Sell; Exchange. Two Cents a Word. Cash With Copy 



SPECIAL 



MINERVA, 1909. TWIN 8 H. P., built especially for us by the 
MINERVA COMPANY. Condition perfect; the machine has not 
been ridden over 200 miles. We guarantee a speed of over 65 
miles an hour. The PRICE, $225.00. 

Also our MINERVA SINGLE 4 H. P. RACER. Condition per- 
fect. Speed 55 miles an hour. PRICE $125.00. 

To the purchasers of these two machines we will bind ourselves to 
refund the purchase price less io7c if after a month's trial the 
machines do not prove satisfactory. 
GEORGE V. LYONS MOTOR CO., 2382 Broadway, New York 



SPECIAL 



J FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE | 

FOR SALE — F. N. four-cylinder new 1909 model in per- 
fect condition. Address Bargain, care Motorcycle Illus- 
trated. 

FOR SALE — 1909 5-h.p. Twin Indian, with tandem; best 
offer takes it. Perfect order, ridden little over 300 miles. 
T. A. Mauch, Yazoo City, Miss. 

FOR SALE — New Pierce motorcycle. 4 cyl., 7 h.p. Ad- 
dress F. L. Thompson, 8 Garrison St., Paterson, N. J. 

FOR SALE — Indian Tricar in good condition, $50.00; 
also 1908 Twin Indian, $150.00. John F. Miller, Meriden, 
Conn. 

FOR SALE — New 1909 Indian motorcycle; 3^ h.p.; 
magneto, horn and cyclometer; cost $254.50; $180.00 takes 
it; rode 139 miles. Am a coward; afraid of dogs. J. S. 
W. Burpee, Rockland, Me. 

WANTED — Bicycie motor attachment wanted. F. In- 
gersoll, 2325 Atlantic Avenue, Atlantic City, N. J. 

FOR SALE — 1908 "Armac" motorcycle, with brand new 
engine and special equipment. Make any reasonable offer. 
Charles H. Rennie, 817 West 87th St., Chicago, 111. 

FOR SALE — 1909 Twin Indian, magneto, perfect con- 
dition. A bargain, $185.00. W. S. Brady, 52 Andrew St., 
Massillon, Ohio. 

INDIAN, PIERCE, MERKEL, AND M. M. MOTOR- 
CYCLES. Full stock of latest specialties. Prompt mail 
order service on Indian parts and accessories. Callwell's 
Motorcycle Agency, 10 Colden St., Newburgh, N. Y. 

FOR SALE — 1909 2>y 2 h. p. Yale, in first-class condition; 
price reasonable. Address J. I. Sharpe, Ashland Ave., 
Zanesville, Ohio. 

FOR SALE— At $175, M. M. magneto motorcycle; cost 
$225; used but little; good as new. Farmers Bank, Lee's 
Summit, Mo. 

FOR SALE— 1909 loop frame 5-h.p. Twin Indian, with 
side car; condition same as new; has Bosch magneto. Best 
offer takes it. Address J. W. Dickinson, 36 Pearl Court, 
New Britain, Conn. 

WANTED— 3^-h.p. 1909 Indian, belt drive. J. C. 
Mayer, 7 W. 24th St., New York City. 



FOR EXCHANGE— Two Columbia chainless bicycles; 
one has Pope two-speed coaster brake; both practically 
new; one watch, open face, sixteen size, 20 year case, 15 
jewel Waltham movement; wanted to exchange for Indian 
motorcycle; will pay cash difference. Address A. A. Jor- 
dan, 264 Lumpkin St., Athens, Ga. 

FOR SALE. — 1908 Indian Twin with 1909 fore car run 
300 miles. Fan and B. & C. two speed gear. Excellent 
condition. Write G. S. Mumford, care of Motorcycle 
Illustrated, 299 Broadway, New York. 

FOR SALE. — Three h.p. Thomas Auto Bi Motorcycle, 
$124. Equipment, two-tone Gabriel horn, cut-out valve, 
Curtiss carbureter, lamp, separate gas generator, new mud- 
guards, good tires, stand, extra connecting rod, bushings, 
piston rings, leather leggings, etc. Long, low snappy ap- 
pearance; in fine shape. Address "Bargain," care Motor- 
cycle Illustrated. 



AGENTS CARDS, ETC. 



MOTORCYCLES thoroughly overhauled and repaired. 
Agents for Thor motorcycles, parts and sundries. Brazenor 
& Ruderman, 849 Bedford avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

M-M and R-S MOTORCYCLES— East End Cycle Co., 
Highland & Beitler, near Centre avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

FOR SALE— New 5-h.p. twin Indian, $200; second-hand 
5-h.p. twins, $125 up; singles, $75 up. F. B. Widmayer 
Company, 2312 Broadway, New York City. 

SECOND-HAND M. M. BARGAINS— Exhaust Whistles, 
Hand Idlers. M. M. Branch, 8 95 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

DISCOVERED— The motorcyclists' best friend on a windy 
night. A positive stormproof lamp lighter, once used, never 
without ; finest thing in the world for smokers ; only 25 cents. 
Tiger Cycle Works Co., 782 Eighth avenue, New York City. 

B. & C. Two-Speed and Free Engine Gears; Ideal equip- 
ment for Motorcycles. Bushnell & Cannon, 1268 E. 80th 
place, Cleveland, Ohio. 



PfANSIIEHL (OILS 



FOR MOTORCYCLES 

Arc Guaranteed Absolutely 

lor 5 Years 

Our patented system of Pancake winding explains thlg, and also 
the wonderful efficiency of all Pfanstiehl Coils. Three reasons for our 
great popularity: 

Indestructibility Reliability Price 

PFANSTIEHL ELECTRICAL LABORATORY, North Cfcago, III. 



r.N. 



/\LL SOLO OUT! 

We are glad to announce we have sold all of the F. N. Big Four 
Motorcycles we contracted for the 1900 season, but sorry to say that 
on account of the enormous demand in Europe we are unable to get any 
more. Please don't send us any orders therefor, for we will only have 
to return them with thanks and regrets. We'll soon be ready to 
talk 1910 to you. 

OVMQTOM MOTOR CO., 2232 Bromdwmy, #*w York 



F.N 



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32 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



Here It Is— A Dependable Coaster Brake 

For Motorcycles 

The NEW 
NEW DEPARTURE 

INTERNAL EXPANDING BAND COASTER BRAKE 




Tool Stool Brako Band and Lover 



Now Actuator 




Band Brake Showing Top Plato Holding Parte 
in Position (Transparent View.) 



POWERFUL— Will stall high powered motors 

POSITIVE — Responds instantly to back pedal 

pressure 

PRACTICAL — Efficiency has been proved by 

severe road tests 



Will not bind or lock. Will not cut into brake drum 

Will not " feed up" or drag pedals when coasting 

Will not fail to operate because of overheating 

You Ought To Have It— Write For Folder 

The New Departure Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn. 

Coaster Brake Licensors 

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August 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



41 




ROAD-RIDING QUALITIES 



OF THE 



NEW ERA ADTOCYCLE 

in the F. A. M. Endurance Run—Cleveland to Indianapolis 

ONE PERFECT SCORE 

One Score of 075 Points— No New Era Rider 

Had to Push His Machine at any Point Through the 378 Miles of the 

Most Gruelling Contest Conducted by the Federation 




<> 

O 

o 









PATENT PENDING 

TWO SPEED GEAR AND FREE MOTOR WORKED PERFECTLY 

The New Eras Were Ridden Through Miles of Sand, and Climbed EVERY 

HILL on the Course, While Scores of Other Riders Were 

Compelled to Dismount and Push Their Machines 

COMFORT, ENDURANCE AND DEPENDABILITY 

These are The MOST STRIKING Characteristics of the New Era. If you 
are* Live and Progressive, You Will Write for our Agency Proposition 






NEW ERA GAS ENGINE COMPANY, 

22 DALE AVENUE, DAYTON, OHIO 






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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



Nights Curtain Draws Asid 
When Touched 




'"THE motorcyclist is fast learning what the auto- 
* mobilist learned years ago. 

A poor light is both a nuisance and a standing in- 
vitation to accident, danger and expense. 

Prest-O-Lite is not expensive. And it has a big 
insurance value. 

The light is unwavering, reliable. 

The flame neither flares up nor dies down, no mat- 
ter how many bumps. The cleanliness and con- 
venience are your clear gain. Simply turn the gas 
off and on, like a gas jet. 



The Prest-O-Lite Motorcycle Gas Tank is 12 in. 
long and 4 in. diameter. Weighs 7 pounds. Holds 
10 ft. of gas — 40 hours of light. 



PRICE $10 

Thirty-day trial plan. 



FULL TANK 75c. 

(In Exchange for Empty) 

See your dealer, or write us. 



The Prest-O-Lite Co., Indiana^., m. 

Branches at New York, Boston, Philadelphia. San Francisco 
and Cleveland. 3.000 Exchange Agents 



1910 



I 


A 

V 


I 


Q 







1910 



SPARK COILS, SPARK PLUGS, SWITCHES, TIMERS 

AND DISTRIBUTERS AND MAGNETOS 

MADE IN AMERICA HAVE NO SUPERIOR IN THE MARKET 

Motorcyclists : ZSU^Jfi&ttfi^r"' 

No matter what make motorcycle you use. It is the 
spark that does the business, therefore use Pittsfield Ig- 
nition. Remember that our coils are the most efficient, 
giving you the hottest, fattest spark possible and shoots it 
where it will give the best results every time. We have 
coils for any number of cylinders required — we make 
either flat or torpedo heads. The Pittsfield Spark 
Plug is the Best Made. The mica insulation will 

not crack, it being so perfectly made that the mica is virtually solid electrodes; are so prepared that 
they afford the greatest resistance to the high tension current. No matter whether it is for motorcycles, 
cars, boats or aeroplanes— insist on having the best, which is the Pittsfield System. 
Magneto Spark Plu£ Write for Particulars, Catalogues, Price Lists, Etc. 

PITTSFIELD SPARK COIL CO., Dalton, Mass. 

Sales Representatives: New England, W. J. Council, 36 Columbus Avenue, Boston. Atlantic States, Thomas J.Wetzel. 17 Weit 
42nd Street, New York. Central States, K. Franklin Peterson, H. V. Greenwood, 166 Lake Street, Chicago. Michigan, 
L. D. Bolton, 319 Hammond Building, Detroit. Pacific Coast, The Laugenour Co., San Francisco. 

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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



35 



IS THERE ANYTHING IN A NAME? 
Sometimes, Yes. That is the Case -with the 

Reliance Motorcycle 

Which Proved Its Right to Its Title in the F. A. M. National Endurance Run, in Which the Five 

RELIANCE Machines Secured SEVENTY-SEVEN PER CENT. 

of the Possible Number of Points. 

Not only that, but a misunderstanding of the rules caused us the loss of a 
much higher score with our Model E. It seems that this rider was held 45 minutes 
at the Coshocton control because our boys were out of gasoline; this delay was just 
sufficient to make him a few minutes over the limit time in arriving at Columbus. 
He was later told that had he secured the signature of a couple of people at Coshoc- 
ton he would have been all right. The machine went on through the next day, and 
during the whole trip this machine was perfect in action, without a single repair 
or even a puncture. Besides, inability to secure lubricating oil the second day was 
answerable for the loss of two gold medals on our Model C, but this, of course, was 
"one of the fortunes of war." 

For further particulars, and our catalogue, write to the 

Reliance Motorcycle Co., Owego, N. Y. 



YOUR SAFETY IS ASSURED 



DURABLE, SIMPLE AND POSITIVE, THE 

CORBIN SPELLS RELIABILITY 

. . MAKE YOUR MOTORCYCLE 

fekm/Lf UP TO DATE - 

JUST FIT A CORBIN AND 
FEEL SECURE. 




For Either Chain or Belt. 
Complete Catalogue on Request. 



If your machine, all things 

else being equal, is fitted 

with a Corbin Brake 



Double the Braking Surface of any 
other model. 



Our Brakes are built throughout 
for Motorcycle use. 

We are Licensed Coaster 
Brake Manufacturers 



We make them at New Britain, Conn., and Bell 
them everywhere 



CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION, 



NEW BRITAIN, 
CONN. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



29 DAYS A MOTORCYCLIST 

EMBLEM RIDER MAKES GOOD IN 

F. A. M. National Endurance Run 

Mr. Heil secured a Per- 
fect Score on a machine 
that had been finished only 
the Sunday before, and had 
not been tried out before. 
There's dependability for 
you. 

The performance of the 
EMBLEM in this run 
proved conclusively that 
this machine has the 
strength to get there with 
the best of them. One of 
our Trade Riders had a 
Perfect Score, and the 
other lost only 15 points, 
because of his having to 
ride on a flat tire for sev- 
eral miles. 




Write for oar catalogue and oar Agency proposition 



EMBL EM MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 



34 H. P. $175.00 
4 H.P. $200.00 

ANGOLA, N. Y. 




Coaster 
Brakes 



are made for Motorcycles and demanded by the wise 
rider. He is the man who knows the necessity of having 
a brake that can be depended upon. "THOR" Motor- 
cycle Coaster Brakes are not experiments. The test of 
man and time has proven that it is the only Brake for 
a Motorcycle. Motorcycle dealers can tfet it in their 
equipment. Don't fail to demand it. 

AURORA AUTOMATIC MACHINERY CO. 

THOR BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Licensed Coaster Brake Manufacturers 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



37 



MR* DEALER — something worth your knowing: 




It is Easy Enough to get 

Perfect Scores and 

Large Percentages in 

Endurance Contests 

All that is necessary is to enter a 
large ntuaber of machines, and they 
are a pretty poor lot if some of them 
do not pull through. 

But when only one 
Machine competes 

and it finishes with a perfect score, 
it tells a story of confidence, qual- 
ity and reliability that cannot fail to 
impress the thinking man. 



This is the case with 

The TORPEDO in the F. A. M. Endurance Contest. It Earned 100 per cent- 
One storied and it finished with a perfect score, although the rider. Mr. A. H. Peters, had been run into 
by another rider and was delayed by a broken saddle. 

It is this sort of service which the TORPEDO is rendering day in and day out If you are seeking gen- 
uine reliability, let us hear from you. 

Have you read this Ad. carefully? If not. read it again. 

THE HORNECKER MOTOR MFG. CO.. n n :: GENESEO. ILL. 



III lU M % motorcycle speed- 
V vll Md%3 omete r, years ago. 
He improved on 
the original. Each succeeding year 
brought out something a little better 
than the previous one. You proba- 
bly remember the old friction drive _ rWMIM ^^^ 
and some of the other earlier models. SEAS --.METE 
Compare the new Jones Model 32 that TRf ODOMETER 
is illustrated herewith with any other 
speedometer on the market to-day. 
You will and it is just as far ahead of 
the field as it is ahead of the early 
models that Jones made. It takes ex- 
perience to build speedometers. See 
that you get the 



MAXIMUM 
SPEED HAND 



JONES SPEEDOMETER 



WNB SPBDOMCmt MPT 
UNIT® MANUfACTURQtS, lnc 

Broadway and 76th St. 
NEW YORK 




wstantanl: set 



Moael 32, 60 Mile Scale, Maximum hand 

Price $25 



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38 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 



>w*********fl** ********** 



The Smallest, 
Lightest, 

Most Efficient 

Magneto 

Ever Made 



is THE 



HERZ- 
MAGNETO 




Runs in Annular Ball Bearings. 

Minimum Power Required. 

No Attention. No Lubrication. 



It is winning 

many races and 

endurance tests 



Write for Our New Catalog 



tlEKJL & f>€)*9 ENGINEERS 

295 Lafayette St., New York 



********************** 



THE 

1910 
GREYHOUND 



now on its final tests, has more than met the rigid 
requirements we have made of it. 

It is a new motorcycle from the ground up, 
designed and built with the sole idea of present- 
ing the machine that will make the selection of a 
1910 mount a short and easy matter. 

We have studied closely, and, we believe, in- 
telligently, the development of motorcycle con- 
struction, and this model is our answer to all your 
questions as to what is best. 

While performance is the first and great thing, 
we know that 

DURABILITY 
COMFORT 
SIMPLICITY 
CONVENIENCE 
FINE LINES 

all must have full consideration, and we are con- 
tent to go after the business of 1910 with this 
machine, believing it to be the best expression 
now possible of what the riders want. 

Information is as free as air at our house and 
we want to hear from every man who is or who 
may be interested in finding the best motorcycle 
to ride or to sell. 



Greyhound Motor Works 

1459 Niagara Street, 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 



=SALES AGENTS:^ 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT: 
THE BROWN- DEWEY CO.. 

1697 Broadway. NEW YORK 

CHICAGO DISTRICT: 

WHIPPLE, "THE MOTORCYCLE MAN." 

260 West Jackson BouUvard, - CHICAGO 



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September 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



39 



Wear Longest 
Easiest to Fix 

Goodyear Moulded Clincher Motorcycle Tires 

SAVE THE USER MONEY Because They Wear Longest, 
Cost the Loast for Upkeep, and are Easily REPAIRED 




Ycu can travel 
further on a 
Goodyear 
than any 
tire. 



m£ H > 



Four Plies 
of the 



We can furnish 
these tires in 
either single 
or double 
clinch. 



Toughest Fabric Known \£ 

The wise motorcyclist who fig- 
ures up the cost at the end of the 
season knows that the Goodyear is 
really the LOWEST PRICED tire on 
the market. It will outwear several 
pairs of the ordinary kind. Because the 
cover stock is of toughened rubber, the 
strongest made, especially treated, built for 
the extreme of wear, yet still retaining its 
resiliency. This is strengthened by the casing 
—moulded type — which has four plies of the 
strongest, toughest, most durable, most closely 
woven fabric, put Into any motorcycle tire. This 
is the famous Sea Island which costs 55c a va I d * 
We could use common muslin at 5#c a yard. But 
it requires 300 pounds to break Sea Island fabric 
while common muslin breaks at 40 to 60 pounds. 
Hence it wouldn't do for 

rOOD^EAR 



MOULDED, 



CLINCHER 



MOTOR - CYCLK TIRES 

The construction of this Sea Island fabric is such 
that if a Goodyear Tire is cut or jagged by sharp 
stones, or other obstacles, it can be repaired easily. 
The fabric being so closely woven, it does not 
separate. 

Goodyear Motorcycle Tires can be permanently re- 
paired. Some motorcycle tires are 'done for just 
as soon as they are slightly damaged. The tube is 
of the same stock as we use in our famous Red Seal 
Automobile Tubes. Butt end or endless style. J 

We use nothing but the very finest new Para, I 
fresh from the trees, in Goodyear Tires. There 1 
are other grades that we could buy from 75 to 
90 per cent less — but they would not do for 
Goodyear. Common muslin would answer its 
requirements just about as well. 

With all their strength and durability, 
Goodyear Clincher Motorcycle Tires are the 
most resilient, easiest riding. 

We can furnish them in either single 
or double clinch. Write for sample 
section. 
Cetour Special Agency Propomition 





The Goodyear Tire 6 js 






Rubber Co. / M 






Mott Street f 


touches ^B 
Ml Agencies : 1 




Akron, Ohio^ F -ST 

^^^^^___^^^^M ^^W *" Los Angeles, 9 «9- 


Atlanta, 90 North 




j£^r 951 So. Main St.; 


Pry or St.; Boston, 




^^F N ew York City, 64th 


a6i Dartmouth St.; 




St. and Broadway; 


Chicago, 82-84 Michi- 




^^■j ^^T Philadelphia. Broad 


gan Are.; Buffalo. 719 
Main St.; Cincinnati, 31 




^^^^BB HBP*^^ and Fairmount Ares.; 


1 


Pittsburg, 5088 Center Ave.; 


East 5th St.; Cleveland, 


2005 


San Francisco, 506 Golden Gate 


Euclid Ave; Denver, a8 West Colfax 


Ave.; Detroit, 051 Jefferson Ave. 


Ington, 1086 Connecticut Ave. 



STILL PEER OF THEM ALL 

THE FAMOUS 

F. A. M. ENDURANCE MODEL 

For the 3d successive year gains 1,000 points and a 

6S T f\ R T E D F* I N I S HI E D f— ■ 
Tire trouble alone put out the sixth, «3P 

Think of it! Not a trace of mechanical trouble of any kind on 
the entire trip. That same bull dog tenacity heretofore always 
found present in the N. S. II, Motors was again well evidenced. 

In connection with this smooth running and reliable motor, the 
peref -Jt balanced frame and ease of control make the N. S. U. THE 
IDEAL MOTORCYCLE. 




Eddie Lingenf elder and His "White Pet" N. S. U. 

He fearlessly bumped over the dangerous Indianapolis Speedway 
and won the 10 mile pro. race. He entered the race and strapped 
himself fast to his machine, because he knew the sound N, S. U. 
to be dependable, 

The perfect construction, the feeling of secureness and the 
wealth of power helped him to victory. 

No lightened up special; just a plain stock N. 8. U. motor did 
the trick. Write to-day for Catalogue "M." 

N. S. U. MOTOR COMPANY Z 

206 West 76th Street NEW YORK CITY 






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40 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 1, 1909. 




Won Every Race 

WHICH MACHINE? 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON, OF COURSE 



Consult the reading columns of this issue for the results of the Galesburg, 
111.. Races. The Harley-Davidson captured every first and almost every second 
in six events. Note especially our showing in the private owner races. That's 
where speed and reliability count most; but then the 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON ALWAYS MAKES GOOD 

Whether in Races, Endurance Runs (See 1907, 1908 and 1909 official returns), 
or in general road riding. Ask any Harley-Davidson rider what he thinks 
of his machine and then get in touch with the 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



A FEW WORDS OF APPRECIATION 

From a Contented Rider and Agent Who Made a Perfect Score 
in the F. A. A. National Endurance Run 



This is a 
Sample of 
Hundreds 
of Letters 
we receive 

from our 
Patrons 



Rochester, N. Y., Aug. 14, 1909. 
Eclipse Machine Co., 

Elmira, N. Y. 
Dear Sirs; 

It is a great pleasure to go into an Endurance Contest and 
never have to worry about your coaster brake. I have sold 
about fifty of your brakes this summer, and I am glad to say 
that I have never had one complaint against them or any 
trouble in any way. I think they are the only perfect brakes 
for motorcycles. 

Yours truly, 

A. D. COOK. 



They Tell a 

Story of 

Reliability 

They 

Prove 

Our Brake 

is Right 



Eclipse Coaster Brake Users Always Get Perfect Satisfaction 
We are Licensed Coaster Brake Aanufacturers 



ECLIPSE MACHINE CO., 



ELMIRA, N. Y. 



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September 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



31 



IN THE F. A. M. ENDURANCE CONTEST, Cleveland to 
Indianapolis, August lOtn and 1 ltn 

9 R-S ^Finished 

4 Gold Medals ( p , E c"o r R E « c , T ) 5 Silver Medals 

Again demonstrating R-S durability and Superiority. All of these machines were single 
cylinder models and with one exception all of them were equipped with 3 H. P. motors, tho 
smallost slnglo oyllndor R-S motor mmdo 9 making the performance a truly remarkable 
one, especially when compared with the competing high powered single and twin cylinder 
machines ridden by experts. Most of the R-S riders were novices. 

With but one exception the number of R-S Machines which finished was larger than that 
of any other make. 

The R-S mechanically operated Intake Valve Motor stands unsurpassed— get acquainted 
with the R-S family— single cylinder 3 and 4 H. P.— Twin cylinder 6 and 7 H. P. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND RIDE AN R-S 



Reading Standard Company, Sa A 



Bingaman and 
ter Streets 



Reading, Pa. 



Has Ridden Over 4,000 Miles on 
These Tires — Tread Not Worn 

See What a Perfect Tire This Is The Toughest, Yet the Easiest Riding 



A. L. Olds of Toledo, Ohio, writes this about his 
experience with Goodyear Tires : 

"About two years ago I got a pair of your 2 l /z x 28 inch 
Motorcycle Tires for my demonstrating Wagner tandem, 
and I am pleased to say that these are still on the machine 
after covering 4,000 miles over all kinds of roads, with two 
persons the greater part of the time, and often a total 
weight of over 550 pounds. 

"These tires are now in better shape than many which 
I have seen which have not been in use two weeks, and 
covered not to exceed 400 miles, with a single rider. 

"The corrugations are not quite worn out of the middle 
of the tread, and there is not a cut, scratch or bruise in 
the casings, although I have run over newly crushed stone 

roads for miles, and have en- 
countered all the usual objects 
in the city streets, such as 
►roken glass, tin and cinders, 
hut fortunately I have had no 
•unctures." 



The Goodyear Is really the lowest priced tire. It will outwear several 
pairs of ordinary tires, because the cover stock 19 made of toughened 
rubber, built for the extreme of wear, yet still retaining its resiliency. 
This is strengthened by the casing — moulded type — which has four 
plies of the most durable, most closely woven fabric known. This 
is the famous Sea Island fabric, which costs 55c. a yard. We could 
use common muslin at sJ^c. a yard. But it requires 300 pounds to 
break this fabric, while common muslin breaks at 40 to 60 pounds. 
Hence it wouldn't do for 



Moulded Clincher 
Motorcycle Tires 




(JOOD^YEAR 

The construction of this Sea Island fabric is such that if a Goodyear 
Tire is cut or jagged by sharp stones or other obstacles it can be 
repaired easily. The fabric being so closely woven it does not separate. 
And Goodyear Motorcycle Tires can be permanently repaired. 

The tube is of the same stock we use in our famous Red Seal Auto- 
mobile Tubes. Butt end or endless type. 

The only rubber used in Goodyear Tires is the finest of new Para. 
We could use cheaper grades that would cost but a fourth of what we 
p"ay. We could even use "reclaimed" rubber from the junk pile, that 
we could get for next to nothing. With all their strength and dura- 
bility Goodyear Clincher Motorcycle Tires are the most resilient, easiest 
riding. We can furnish them in either single or double clinch. Write 
for sample section. Get out special agency proposition. 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE 6 RUBBER COMPANY, Moal Street, Akron, Ohio 

^•nnkAti Atlanta. 90 North Pryor St.: Boston. 669 Boylston St.: Chicago. 82-S4 Michigan Ave.; Buffalo. 719 
prOOCneS. M„j n j* t .: Cincinnati. 317 E. Fifth St.: Cleveland. 2005 Eueli.l Ave; Denver. 2P W. Colfax Ave.; 
Detroit. 251 Jefferson Ave.: I»«* Angeles. 949-51 S. Main St.: New York City. 64th St. and Broadway: Philadelphia. 
Broad and Fftlrmnunt Aves. : Pittsburg. rrf».«S Center Ave.; San Francisco, 506 Golden Gate Ave.; St. Louis, 3935-37 
Olive St.; Washington. 1026 Connecticut Ave. 

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32 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 15. 1909. 




sRSSS^jb 




THE SPARK IN 
WATER PLUG 



the package in which your spark plug 
comes bears this mark you have not re- 
ceived the best. 

The perfect ignition can only be obtained 

^^ by the use of the plug that "Sparks in 

k^ water"; it is the proof of infallibility. 

Soot — carbon or any combination or fouling matter found 

in a gasoline engine has no effect whatsoever on Reliance 

Spark Plugs. 

*Jo cleaning necessary as the sparking point is so small 
that the spark is intensified to such a degree that all such 
matter around that point is destroyed. 

Ask the man who uses Reliance Spark plugs what he 
thinks of them, then order from your dealer or send to us 
direct for booklet containing valuable information in regard 
to Ignition. 

Made in Porcelain or Mica backs — all sices. 

JEFFERY-DEWITT CO. 

230 HIGH STREET. NEWARK, N. J. 

*. d F. STEPHENSON, Agents for United Kingdom, 19 Can- 
ning PI., Liverpool, Eng. 
ARM AND FRET d CO.. Agents for Continental Europe, 
Berlin, Germany. 



Three Clean Sweeps 



FOR THE 



Harley-Davidson 



Galesbnrg, Illinois, August 30th. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1st in 7 races. 



Wansau, Wisconsin, September 5th. 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON, 1st in 4 races. 



La Salle, Illinois, September 6th. 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON, 1st in 5 races. 

Ride a Winner! 



HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO. 

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 



The 1909 F.A. M. Endurance Run only verifies 
our claims for the CURT1SS 

One Curtiss Started One Perfect Score 

PERCENTAGE 100 




Isn't this the greatest possible proof of their 
SUPERIORITY ? 
They have been consistent winners since 1903 
2 Perfect Scores - - - 1906 
DIAMOND MEDAL - - 1907 
2 Perfect Scores - - - 1908 
PERFECT SCORE - - 1909 

We're now making a specialty of the Endurance 

Run Model 

7 H. P. Double Cylinder, $275.00 

3U H. P. Single Cylinder, $200.00 

Place your order now for 1 0-day delivery 

THE HERRING-CURTIS COMPANY, HAMMONDSPORT, N. Y. 

Eastern Distributor: 

CURTISS MOTORCYCLE CO., 1208 Bedford Ave. , Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Pacific Coast Distributor : 
GEO. A. FAULKNER, 351 12th St., Oakland, Cal. 



WHIPPLE The Motorcycle Man 

The best in the world is none too good ftir our customers. 
Motorcycles and accessories at lowest prices. Pierce 4 cylinder, 
$350; Indians, nine models, $175 to $325. Good second hand, 
all kinds, down to $40. Send for our sundry catalog. 

THE MOTORCYCLE MAN 

260 W. Jackson Blvd.. CHICAGO 



WHIPPLE 



NEW/ EDITION-JUST OUT 



it 



Construction, Management and 
Care of Motorcycles" 

Ranted and Enlarged- 60 Paces— 25 CENTS 

MOTORCYCLE PUB. CO., 299 Broadway, NEW YORK 



Only A Few Weeks More 

and then we shall have something very 
interesting to announce regarding the 

Reliance 1910 Models 

It will be worth your while to wait until 
you know what the New Reliance 
machine will be like. 

Reliance Motorcycle Company 

OWEGO. N. Y. 



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September 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



33 



Don't envy the man who hat perfect 
ignition. Use a 

SPLITDORF 
Motorcycle Coil 

and have it yourself 



WILL OUTLAST YOUR MOTOR 




And don't ac- 
cept a 



„«r- "J ust as 8 ood -" 
r*:^*" . There is none. 



At all live 



Dealers or 
direct. 



C F. SPLITDORF 



Walton Ave. and 138th St. N^ w V^wlr 

Branch, 1679 Broadway lieW * OFK 



CHICAGO 
119 Hlealraa It*. 



8AH FRANCISCO 
4«0 Tu Hhi Ave. 



DETROIT 

868 Woodward Ave. 



BOSTON 
Motor Mart 



COMFORT AND ENDURANCE 

ARE TWO OF THE QUALITIES WHICH 
HAVE SO WONDERFULLY POPULARIZED 

MESINGER MOTORCYCLE SADDLES 

That is why most of the Two, Three and Four Cyl- 
inder Machines are equipped with Mesinger Cavalry 
'.Type Motor Saddles. They have the Right Shape for 
Comfort and have Fibre Friction Shock Absorbers. 

The Mesinger Cavalry Saddle is made like a horse 
saddle — it prevents you from slipping and avoids that 
crampish hold of the hands on the handle-bar. 




••CAVALRY" No. 3. 

(PATENTED.) 

Whether for Touring Purposes or 
merely riding in the vicinity of your 
home, The Mesinger saddle always satisfies. It is honest 
value. It is the result of many years* experience in the 
manufacture of motorcycle saddles. 

B. 6 F. MESINGER MFG. COMPANY 

1801-1803 First Avenue, - ■ New York 



Europe's Most 

Successful Magneto 

Wins in America! 



THE 



IlI L Tension 



Magneto 



Is the Smallest, Lightest and Most 
Efficient Magneto Ever Made. 

The most perfect type of ignition obtainable. No starting 
device, timer, or coil required. 

Generates a very hot spark and real arc flame. 

A marvel of fine workmanship. All parts interchangeable. 




Read 

This Letter 

"No doubt you will be pleased to learn that one of the 
machines driven by the winning Yale Team in the Chicago 
Motorcycle Club hndurance Run, July q-io-ii, was equipped 
with the Herz-Magneto. The battery box, magneto, carbure- 
tor, spark plugs and vibrator were sealed. The run was 6oo 
miles and was made without a single adjustment, making 
a perfect team score, every seal being intact. This estab- 
lishes a new record. 

"THE CONSOLIDATED MANUFACTURING CO., 

"A. B. COFFMAN, Sales Mgr." 



IT NEVER FAILS! 
IT NEVER FOULS! 

WE GUARANTEE IT FULLY 
for Oh Teir 

HE RZ- PLUG 

"BOUCIE MERCEDES" 
Is proof against oil or 
soot; self-cleaning. Forms 
part of your motor, same 
as the pistons. Needs 
never to be taken out. 
Pries, Standard, Motor- 
cycle or Magneto Types 

$1 R fl Postpaid 
I • 9 II Everywhere 

ASBESTOS COPPER GASKET* 
LtrrMt Stork la America. 600 «lcr« 




HERZ & CO., 

Corner Lafayette and Houston Streets 
NEW YORK 



Civil 

Engineers 



PARIS 



VIENNA 



fREE — Our New Ignition Booklet is free. Write for it. 



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34 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 15, 1909. 




MOTORCYCLE OIL LAMP 

Showing a Red Rear Light 

A combination of headlight and tail light 

in one lamp. 
The Neverout burns kerosene oil 16 hours 
with one filling and will staj lighted under 
any and all conditions. 

All riveted — will not rattle apart over 
the roughest roads. 

Sold on ten days' trial. Price $3.00 
complete. 

The Neverout is 
equipped with a 
patent glass-cov- 
e r e d reflector, 
made of pure Ger- 
man silver; in* 
ftantly removable; 
never loses its 
original brilliancy. 
Guaranteed to stay 
lighted or money 
refunded. 

Made in gun 
metal, brass and 
nickel finish. 

The only perfect 
and reliable motor- 
cycle lamp made. 

If your dealer 
cannot supply you, 
write us direct. 

Dealers: Write 
at once for 
proposition. 




The Neverout Motorcycle Lamp, with 
combination tail light, showing rear view. 
(Patented.) 



our 



ROSE MANUFACTURING CO. 



$33 Arch Street 



Philadelphia. Pa. 



Ride All Night 
If You Need To ! 




But see to it that your machine 
is fitted with the new SOLAR 
motorcycle lamp and generator. 
That is the one outfit that will 
make your night riding safe. 
Ask any rider who has one what 
he knows about the Solar. It's 
dollars to cents he can't be in- 
duced to use anything else. Do 
you (eel the same way about 
your present equipment? 



THE BADGER BRASS 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

TWO FACTORIES: 

KENOSHA, WISCONSIN 
437 ELEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK 




MOTORCYCLES 

The Classy Proposition 
lor Live Dealers 

We have all kinds of Records for 

Tho Thor 

But the Greatest of these are 
Stability and Satisfaction . 



Aurora Automatic Machinery Co. 

THOR BUILDING, :: CHICAGO, ILL. 



Motorcycle Trip Cyclometers 



Made specially 
for Motorcycles. 
Made larger and 
stronger to with- 
stand the rough 
usage to which ^ 
it is subjected to 
on the Motor- 
cycle. 

Fully 
Guaranteed. 



Supplied for 26" 
or 28 wheels. 




With the new 
adjustable 
bracket (which 
is regularly sup- 
plied) The Vee- 
der Motorcycle 
Trip Cyclometer 
can be attached 
to all makes of 
Motorcycles. 

Price $3.00 

complete with 
Motorcycle 
Striker. 



THE VEEDER MFG. CO.. 

42 Sartfeant St., • Hartford, Conn. 

Makers of Odometers. Cyclometers. Counters. Tacho- 
meters. Tachodometers and fine castings. 



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September 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



35 



NEW ERA AUTO-CYCLE 

Two Speeds, Free Motor, Hand Cranked Motor 




The New Era Gas Engine Company 

22 DALE AVE.. DAYTON. OHIO 



NEW EDITION— JUST OUT 
^CONSTRUCTION, MANAGEMENT AND CURE OF MOTORCYCLES^ 

Revised and Enlarged— 60 Pages. 25 Cents 

Contents. — The Motor, Mechanical Valves, Working 
of Valves, General Motor Parts, Twin Cylinder Motors, 
Motor Tips, Removing and Replacing Cylinder, Over- 
heating, Piston Rings, Knocking and Pounding, Timing, 
Weak Springs, Life of Motors, Care of Valves, Lubri- 
cation, Ignition, Ignition Troubles, Trouble Chart, Mag- 
netos, Carburetor, Transmission, Spring Forks, Tires, 
Two Speed, Attachable Outfits, Belt Don'ts, Other 
Dont's, Cause of Breakdowns, Points to Remember. 

mineral pubushik a. m Biwwiy, new r«t 



GUARANTEED 
MOTORCYCLE 
ACCESSORIES 



Our stock is the largest in America. We have all the 
old standbys and 100 new ones you should know 
about. Send to-day for our money saving 36 page 
catalog and free copy of a new magazine. 

MOTORCYCLE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, Hammondsport, N. Y. 




MAIL THIS TO-DAY 

FRED. WILLIS, 

President F. A. M., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Dear Sir : I (eel that I ought to be a member of the 
F. A. M. We must have a national organization to 
promote motorcycling and to guard and care for its 
many interests. Please send me particulars. 



State 
City- 



(Signed). 



Street. 



INDIAN 

AND 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON 
MOTORCYCLES 

PARTS. SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS 

Send for Largest Motorcycle Accessory Catalogue Ever Issued 

Great Bargains in Second- Hand MOTORCYCLES 

$50 up Twins $150 up 
F. B. WIDMAYER CO. 

2312 Broadway NEW YORK 




HANSEN'S 

AUTO and DRIVING 

\ GLOVE S 



Perfect 
fitting, 

wonderfully soft and pliable 
and wear like iron. 
Write today for hand- 
some descriptive price- 
list and circular. 

0. C. HANSEN MFG. CO. 

337 East Water Street 
MILWAUKEE 



LET THE MOTOR DO THE WORK 

A MOTORCYCLE can be made quickly FROM ANY BICYCLE by 
using our 2 H. P. Motor Outfit. Unequalled for POWER. SPEED 
and RELIABILITY. Anyone can easily attach our Outfit by follow- 
ing the directions we send wltb each Attachment. Best material and 
workmanship. 



FULLY 
GUARANTEED. 

Immediate d e- 
11 very. Send for 
Catalog B. 



Show Wi (o. 

Gal&ibnrg, Kansas 





The Baby "Breeze" 

CARBURETER 

For Motorcycles, made of 
polished aluminum, small parts 
of brass, weighs fourteen 
ounces; small in size, big in re- 
sults; price ten dollars. Dur- 
able, light and strong — a hand- 
ful only — special connections for 
popular machines included in 
price; 8o to 95 miles per gallon 
under normal road conditions. 
Write for special literature. 
Send ten cents for our Engine 
Trouble Text-book. 



One-hall Actual isize 



Breeze Carbureter Company 

266 Halsey St. Newark, N. J. 



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36 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



September 15, 1909. 




MERIT MADE 

mcLtieod 

A BUY WORD 

among owners who MUST hare 
a spark plug that has long life, 
remains clean, and whose porce- 
lain will not crack from heat. 

All Sizes *i fif\ Porcelain 
All Styles ^A-U^orAica 

Send for CaUlof M.I. 

Emil Grossman Company 

Msa>fart*r*r 
232 Weat 58th St.. New York 

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-THIEM 1909- 



If you or your friends or your friend*' friends are in- 
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OTORCYCL 



ILLUSTRATED 



S 2 




October 1, 1909 
PUBLISHED BY THE MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



SIX-DAY RACE AT BRIGHTON A FAILURE 

Petered Out After Eleven Hours of Riding — Rain ""Queered" It 



CALLED off on account of the untoward activity of Jupiter 
Pluvius, the absence of anything resembling a crowd of 
spectators, and a number of other unfortunate circumstances, 
the first "six day" motorcycle contest passed into history much 
sooner than its promoters had anticipated. It must be ad- 
mitted, however, that almost all of the hopefulness v\hich at- 
tached to the venture was enjoyed, previous to the start of the 
race, by those immediately identified with the herculean project. 
The Motorcycle Manufacturers' Association had emphatically 
declined to support the thing, and experts generally were of 
the opinion that its success was decidedly problematical. 
Those behind the affair did their level best to overcome the 
obstacles placed in their path, but they could hardly have 
been expected to accomplish the superhuman, and, accordingly, 
the word "failure" must be writ large upon the c/isket in 
which their ambitions lie buried, deep in the seashore sands 
at Brighton Beach. 

The story of it all is easily told. Plans had been made upon 
an elaborate scale, and no expense had been spared. But, 
strange to say, the entries, of which scores had been expected, 
were not forthcoming. The decision of the manufacturers was, 
of course, largely responsible for this condition of affairs. 
Notwithstanding, the promoters proceeded with the task of se- 
curing a partially representative list and within twenty-four 
hours of the start had obtained the promises of nine teams, as 
follows : 

New York Motorcycle Club — A. G. Chappie, W. T. Robinson 
and W. T. Wray. Harlem Motorcycle Club — L. H. Gutcrman. 
William L. Coursen and Fred Mercier. Concourse Motor- 
cycle Club — L. Restreppo, J. Heichel and M. A. McClelland. 
Bedford Park Motorcycle Club — Al Canfield, Frank Aue and 
Arthur Lundburg. Brooklyn Team — Frank Erickson, Ben 
Ruderman and C. M. Sullivan. Italian Team — Harry Angelo, 
Frank Bruno and Angelo Cornono. South Brooklyn Team — 
T. H. Bennett, V. J. Lind and John Blades. Flatbush Team — 
Mack Christopher, R. Bennett and H. Fends. Troy Team — 
William Jordan, Ray Hunter and John Holmes. 

Of these nine teams only five, the New York Club, Harlem 
Club, Bedford Park, Flatbush and Brooklyn teams lined up 
for the start one minute after midnight Monday morning. The 
Italian team had had its fill in practice, while the other trios 
failed entirely to materialize at the track. 

The conditions were far from ideal, from the standpoint of 
either rider or spectator. True, the track was in fairly good 
condition, the weather was clear, but, as might have been ex- 
pected at this time of the year, a breeze that was altogether 
too cold for comfort swept from the ocean across the course 
\ccordingly, less than five hundred people were present at 
lhe start, and they tried to make up in enthusiasm what they 
lacked in numbers. 

The track was practically in darkness until n o'clock. Be- 
fore that hour several of the riders made practice spins around 



the course. Chappie, of the New York Motor Club, while tun- 
ing up his machine, skidded on the asphalt on the upper turn 
and was thrown on some soft sand inside the track. He was 
taken to the hospital tent and attended by Dr. Griffith, head 
of the surgical corps. He escaped with a few cuts and a bad 
shaking up. It was announced that Chappie had made an un- 
official circuit of the mile course in fifty-four seconds, before 
the mishap. 

There was a great contrast between the scenes preceding 
the start of this race and those which usher in the long grinds 
on bicycles yearly at Madison Square Garden. Instead of the 
smoke-filled arena, with incandescent bulbs striving valiantly to 
shed their light through the murky atmosphere, the moon 
beamed softly through fleecy clouds, and; added to a battery of 
calcium lights, made a striking outdoor spectacle. 

There was little of the hurrah, however, that has been seen 
at similar events. The seaside resort looked extremely lone- 
some, with its attractions closed for the season, and few per- 
sons took the journey down to watch the sputtering machines 
begin their long journey, and as the hour approached for them 
to get under way a band brayed blatantly to a cheerless back- 
ground of empty seats. 

The Xew York Club, with Chappie doing the riding, led at 
the end of the first hour. Chappie had covered twenty-nine 
and one-half miles in the first half hour, and fifty-three and 
one-half miles for the hour. The Harlem Club was then a half 
mile behind. The Harlem boys, however, soon secured the 
lead, and held it until the first recess, at six o'clock in the 
morning. At this stage of the race, the Brooklyn team having 
quit, the score stood: Harlem Club, 309 miles; New York 
Club, 307 miles. This was certainly "some riding." The Bed- 
ford Park and the Flatbush teams were still plugging away, 
doing good work, particularly the former. 

When the four teams were re-started at 8 o'clock, after a 
two-hours' rest, Guterman sustained a fall and the Harlem 
organization lost the lead. The uptown boys were then in- 
formed that the Xew York Club intended only to stav in for 
twenty-four hours, in order to establish a record for that 
period, and then quit. 

So they continued all the morning until only Chappie, of the 
Xew York Club, and Guterman, of the Harlem Club, remained 
on the track. The Flatbush boys had stopped riding at 290 
miles, while the Brooklyn riders had continued until they had 
reached the 514th mile-post, when they also retired. 

By this time it was raining, and at 1.50 p. m., the downpour 
having rendered the track all but unridable, a postponement 
until 5 o'clock was agreed upon. Up to that time, a little 
more than eleven hours and a half, the New York team had 
ridden 599 miles and the Harlem club boys 580. The race was 
not started again at five, as it was still raining, and the 
spectators were so few and far between that it would not 
have been worth while. 



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Charles Spencer (to the left), and Charles Gustafson, Jr., on their Indians. Standing (from left to right), Robert 
Johnson, Carl Nodig and Charles Gustafson, Sr., who took care of the machines. 

Ride More Than 1000 Miles in 24 Hours. 

awe-inspiring in the spectacle of their long, monotonous jour- 
ney around the smooth circle of boards called the Springfield 
Stadium, and it was only the thought that these tireless youths 
were doing this continuously, hour after hour, throughout an 
entire day and, again, from darkness to dawn, that enabled 
the casual spectator to appreciate the significance of it all. 
Then the dual grind, at a rate which during the entire period 
of twenty-four hours averaged from thirty-five to more than 
fifty-five miles an hour, assumed gigantic proportions, and was 
understood in its true light as a feat deserving of the notice 
and the world-wide admiration of men who comprehend the 
real meaning of sustained speed. 

Gustafson and Spencer started oft" at a lively pace, although 
they did not expect to make a race of the first twelve hours' 
riding, being contented with keeping together and reeling off 
a mile in a little over a minute. The first ten miles were cov- 
ered in 10:18, the first twenty-five miles in 26:25; fifty miles 
in 53:20, and in the even hour they covered fifty-seven miles. 

At the end of his 140th mile Spencer stopped for gasolene 
and at the end of the 144th mile his chain broke. At the end 
of the 222d mile he stopped for gasolene again. During the 
same period Gustafson had to stop for gasolene and a broken 
chain also. At the same time a loose valve stem was dis- 
covered in his rear tire. At the end of his 222d mile Spencer 
was four miles ahead of Gustafson. Then his chain broke 
again and so jammed the mud guard into the rear forks that 
some time was taken for repairs, during which time Gustafson 
gained thirteen miles. 

When Spencer remounted his wheel the prettiest part of the 



AFTER having for several months occupied places in close 
proximity to the greater satellites in motorcycle racing, 
Charles Spencer and Charles Gustafson, both Springfield boys, 
have just succeeded in drawing upon themselves the attention 
of the entire fraternity of speed enthusiasts. "Dark horses" 
in every sense of the phrase, but trained to the dot, and filled 
with the confidence that is born of the knowledge of having 
fast machines and every other possible facility for "making 
good," these two riders have simply made mince-meat of the 
twenty-four hour record, previously 775 miles and 1340 yards, 
reeled off last May by H. A. Collier, on the Cannington track 
in England. Not satisfied with having bettered the English- 
man's figures, the two Bay State riders added no less than 
315 and 268 miles respectively to the old record. Spencer 
covered just 1089 miles, 199 yards, while Gustafson, but 
slightly his inferior in speed and endurance, stuck to the fast 
Springfield board track until he had negotiated nearly 1044 
miles. These two wonderfully successful trials were made 
simultaneously, the riders having been started at quarter past 
four Friday afternoon, October 1, mounted on 5 h. Indians, 
each one of the contestants, in accordance with the provisions 
of the new F. A. M. competition rules, using the same machine 
from the start to the remarkable conclusion of their gruelling 
test. 

The steady, twice -around-the-clock grind between the two 
rivals for popular favor and the distinction of travelling the 
greatest distance ever ridden on a motorcycle in a single day, 
proved both extraordinary and, on the other hand, just the 
reverse of that. There was absolutely nothing remarkable or 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



raee began. Spencer set out to make up his loat time. Lying 
close to his frame and opening up his engine, he tore around 
the circle at a furious pace, passing Gustafson, who was riding 
at a uniform gait, on Spencer's 235th mile and Gustafson's 
247th mile. Spencer's 300 miles were covered in 6 hours 7 
minutes 41 seconds; Gustafson's in 5 hours 58 minutes and 
55 seconds. 

Until about two or three o'clock in the morning the riders 
were very comfortable, the only disagreeable feature being 
stiffness in their necks. When the chill damp of the early 
morning began to make itself felt, they suffered considerably. 
Short rests were taken and the men were rubbed down and 
givn a sparing amount of refreshment, neither being particular 
about eating anything. In fact, Spencer did not eat until he 
had ridden 12 hours, which was at 4.15 o'clock in the morning, 
when he took a rest of 31 minutes. At 8 o'clock he took an- 
other rest of 15 minutes and ate some toast and eggs. Spencer 
gained his lead during the time that Gustafson was off the 
track because of a broken chain, which trouble he experienced 
several times during the early hours of the morning. 
Occasionally Spencer would be seen to lie upon the 
bar of his machine, part the wind and flash past Gustafson 
at a sixty-mile gait, holding this speed for a lap and then 
reducing it until he was the usual half-a-wheel distance in the 
rear, thus letting Gustafson break the wind for him. Gustafson 
stood it for a while and then tried it himself. He did pass 
Spencer once or twice, but Spencer, always ready to ride the 
limit, held the ambitious Swede in subjection. 

As the men reeled around the track during the last two 
hours, it was seen that Gustafson was more fatigued than 



Spencer, who is older and stronger physically than the Swede, 
and when Gustafson had gone 973 miles, his attendants 
thought he had better come off the track, but he refused, say- 
ing that he wanted to make at least 1,000 miles. 

At Spencer's 1086th mile, with only three minutes to go, 
both men were seen to change from their half-sitting posture 
to a reclining position along the bar, and the spectators knew 
what was coming. Both men hit the high speed mark, and 
twice they passed the tape rim to rim. When at last the grind 
was over and the pistol brought the men off the trade. 
Spencer left his wheel considerably stronger than was ex- 
pected, but poor Gus was so sleepy that it took his best efforts 
to keep his eyes open. The tables printed below tell the story 
story as graphically as it can be told by figures. 

AMONG our subscribers in the Philippine Islands is 
I ram P. Short, of Albay, in the Albay Province, 
who in renewing his subscription writes: "We shall 
soon have a first-class motorcycle road in this Province, 
in the shape of a triangle, 70 miles around, encircling the 
foot of Mount Mayon, one of the live volcanoes of the 
Philippines. We have only about forty Americans here 
in this place and six motorcycles, though we expect soon 
to have ten or twelve." 

ONE of the live wire dealers in the Buckeye State is D. K. 
De Long, who handles the Indian in Chillicothe, Ohio. 
De Long has managed three successful race meets this sum- 
mer, at the last of which 7,000 Spectators were present 



SPENCER-GUST AFSON TWENTY-FOUR HOUR RECORDS 



RECORD DISTANCES RIDDEN BT THE HOUR 



Hrs. 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 



Distance. 



56 m. 
114 m. 
145 m. 
204 m. 
246 m. 
300 m. 
333 m. 
388 m. 
441 m. 
482 m. 
512 m. 
SS9m. 



587 yds. 



587 yds. 

1,174 yds. 
1,174 yds. 
1,174 yds. 
1,174 yds. 



587 yds. 



Rider. 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Gustafson 

Gustafson 

Gustafson 

Gustafson 

Gustafson 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Spencer 



Hrs. 

13 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18 

19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



Distance. 



585 m. 

641 m. 

677 m. 

730 m. 

767 m. 

812 m. 

862 m. 

911 m. 

945 m. 

986 m. 
1,035 m. 
1,089 m. 



587 yds. 
587 yds. 

587 yds. 
587 yds. 
587 yds. 

587 yds. 
1,174 yds. 
1,174 yds. 

199 yds. 



Rider. 

Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Spencer 



EACH HUNDRED MILES 



Miles. 

100.. 

200.. 

300.. 

400.. 

500.. 

600.. 

700.. 

800.. 

900.. 
1,000.. 
1,043.. 
1,089.. 



Time. 

• 1.44:59. 
. 3.55:20. 

. 548:55. 
. 8.12:31. 
.10.22:36. 
.13.15:16. 
.15.25:26. 

.17.37:31. 
.19.46:00. 
.22.20:59. 
.24.00:00. 
.24.00:00. 



Rider. 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Gustafson 

Gustafson 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Gustafson 

Spencer 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF MILES PER HOUR- SPENCER'S FIGURES 



Hrs. 



Miles. 



Laps. 



1. 
2. 

3- 

4- 
5. 
6. 

7. 
8. 



56. 
57. 
3i. 
59- 
42. 
54- 
33- 
55- 



Hrs. Miles. Laps. 

9 52 1 

10 41 o 

11 30 o 

12 47 1 

13 25 2 

** 56 1 

15 36 o 

16 52 2 



Hrs. Miles. Laps. 

17 37 1 

18 45 o 

19 50 o 

20 48 2 

21 34 1 

22 *, 41 1 

23 •• 49 o 

24 53 1 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



American Machine Second in English T. T. Race 



By B. H. Davies. 



THE English cracks were all in a terrible funk over the 
three Indian machines entered for their annual road 
race on the Isle of Man, and Wells, the Hendee Company's rep- 
resentative in Great Britain, must be adjudged unlucky not to 
have lifted the trophy. The race is run annually, the Isle of 
Man being a small island some sixty miles in circumference, 
and governed by a handy little senate of its own, which can 
close roads for motor racing without any of the cumbrous 
officialdom necessitated by the political machinery of a con- 
tinent. The course consists of a fifteen mile lap, which is cov- 
ered ten times straight off the reel, totaling about 158 miles. It 
is triangular in shape, and full of corners, one of which is a V, 
necessitating a slow down to about ten miles an hour, while 
others can by constant practice be rounded at speeds up to 25 
miles per hour, though not without risk. A long, steep ascent 
is included, with many bends, which restricts the gears to 
touring ratios; and there are also several long down slopes, 
on which the pace rises to 70 or 80 miles an hour. 

All sorts of methods have been tried to facilitate the ra- 
cing of single and twin cylinder machines together in a single 
class. In previous years the handicap has consisted of a 
limited fuel allowance, under which the twins were deprived 
of any chance of victory. This year the gasoline limit was 
removed, and cylinder capacity was substituted, singles being 
granted a maximum of 500 cubic centimetres, and twins 750 
cubic centimetres, in view of their extra weight and friction. 
This dodge came near putting the two brands of machine on 
an equality, and if the fastest single, a Triumph, ridden by 
Jack Marshall, had managed to finish, he might even have 
won ; as it was, he stripped his timing gear in the eighth round, 
and the next fastest, another Triumph, ridden by Newsome, 
was beaten 18 minutes by the ultimate winner. 

The Indians were unlucky from the outset. Wells had in- 
jured his groin over a bad bump in practice, and retired 
after covering one lap. Fletcher was entered to ride a 4 sin- 
gle cylinder of the same make, but had no time to get it 
Teally on the hop, and decided to substitute Wells' old 5 road- 
ster twin, which has often done a mile a minute on Brook- 
land's. This machine, not being his original entry, was ob- 
jected to by other riders, and so he had to stand down, leaving 
<*. Lee Evans on a 5 twin, to represent the United States. 
Marshall's single cylinder Triumph, Stanley's ditto Premier, 
and the two Colliers on 6 Jap twins, were regarded as his 
most dangerous opponents. The last two enjoyed the advan- 
tage of being veterans on the track, whereas Evans is a novice 
at racing corner work. We all knew that if rain fell, Evans 
would be a dead sure winner, as he would be saved the trans- 
mission stoppages which others could not escape; but it fell 
out that there had been no rain in the island for a week pre- 
viously, and the roads were dry and hard. The opening laps 
amply proved that Evans had easily got the fastest jigger in 
the race. 



He was very cautious at all the sharp corners. He regularly 
rounded a certain crucial bend at about twelve miles an hour, 
whereas Collier was hurtling round with terrible swerves 
and rockings at from twenty-five to thirty miles an hour. Still, 
Evans was forty seconds faster than any one else on the first 
lap, and, starting seventh, had pulled up to second place in 
fifteen miles when the road was crowded with over fifty 
riders. On the second round he had increased his vantage to 
fifty-eight minutes, and on the long downhill swoop he was 
certainly traveling a lot faster than Collier, as also on the one 
steep hill in the course. He was picking up about two minutes 
per round upon Collier in his straightaway work, and losing 
most of it at the corners. After five laps Evans was 115 sec- 
onds ahead of H. A. Collier, and still going great guns. 

By this time twenty of the original fifty-five starters had 
dropped out, and the going was much clearer. Simultaneously, 
Evans commenced to slow down the merest trifle, and Collier 
to travel faster. Excluding stoppages for replenishing tanks, 
both men were averaging about 50 miles an hour, a marvelous 
speed for such an awkward and dangerous road. After five 
laps Evans stopped to fill his tanks, and wasted a couple of 
minutes at least, both by taking things in a very leisurely 
fashion, and also by electing to stop at a depot on the straight 
part of the road, instead of imitating Collier and keeping his 
supplies at the V bend near Kirk Michael, where a slowing 
down was unavoidable on each round. 

Taking the road again, Evans continued to reel off each lap 
at a slower pace than formerly, whereas H. A. Collier had 
snatched a nice lead by doing the sixth lap in 18 mins. 9 
sees., beating all records for the course. From thence to 
the finish Collier always had a bit in hand, and finally was re- 
turned winner at an average speed of 50.2 miles per hour, net 
time, beating the flying Indian by 3 mins. 57 sees. Had the 
jockeys been swooped, the Indian would certainly have won, 
and in any case the Indian made pretty good, as it has been 
doing all year. It beat 53 out of 54 rivals into smithereens, 
and those 53 represent the cream of British racing machines 
and crack riders. Some rival makes were repesented by as 
many as sixteen entrants, but even thus they failed to hold 
their own. When Marshall cracked up, he had a minute's 
lead of Evans with his 3 $4* Triumph, and next year when Wells 
has got an Indian single nicely tuned up, it will be interesting 
to see if it in its turn can lick the British cracks. Neither 
Evans nor Collier had any involuntary stops in the course of 
the race. 

Wells opened his new Indian depot in Great Portland street, 
London, with a press banquet on October 14. He and Evans 
have been working Indian interests all season, with only two 
machines, which they have had to use both for track and road 
work, and they have won everything they have gone for. No 
doubt other American machines will be thinking of sampling 
the British market next year, for Wells has made real good. 



HARRY CUNNINGHAM, of Beaumont, Tex., on Octo- 
ber 3, established a record for continuous road riding, 
by covering 560 miles in twenty-one and a half hours, or at 
an average rate of twenty-six miles an hour. Cunningham 
rode a 4 Harley-Davidson. Beginning at 6 o'clock at night, 
Mr. Cunningham rode continuously until 3:30 o'clock Sunday 
afternoon, when he blew out a tire near Nederland. During this 
time he made twenty-six and two-third trips between Beaumont 
and Port Arthur, a total of 560 miles. Mr. Cunningham was 
timed throughout by men stationed at Beaumont and Port 
Arthur, and along the road. At no time during the 21 
hours did he stop longer than two minutes. He had his 
gasoline tank refilled without leaving the saddle, and during 
the ride ate only one sandwich. 



THE fall meeting of the Eastern District of the F. A. M. will 
be held Saturday, October 16, in the rooms of the Spring- 
field Club, 17 Dwight street, Springfield, Mass. The meeting 
will be called to order at 10.30 a. m., and will elect a district 
secretary and treasurer. On the same day, the one and five- 
mile District championship will be decided at the Stadium. 

Up to date, C. C. Wilber, vice-president of the District, has 
appointed the following State Commissioners: Maine, E. M. 
Estabrook, 76 Lincoln street, Bangor ; New Hampshire, Harry 
C. Dean, Keene; Massachusetts, W. F. Mann, 1,000 Boylston 
street, Boston ; Connecticut, George W. Baker, Box 983, Hart- 
ford ; New Jersey, A. J. Sicard, Central avenue and 1st street, 
Hackensack ; Pennsylvania, A. G. Schmidt, 47 Kittanning Pike, 
Sharpsburgh. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October IS, 1909. 




THOUGH these enthusisasts had no opportunity to make 
good, they were nevertheless decidedly "on the job" as 
couriers for the New York to Albany Airship race. Reading 
from left to right, the picture shows Earle L. Ovington, Captain 
Baldwin, the aeronaut, T. K. Hastings, Harold Fletcher, J. 



Buckingham and Stanley Kellogg. The airship racers never 
reached Albany, though had they done so, the task of obtain- 
ing the news and photographs of their feat would have fallen 
upon the above "benzine-buggy" cracks. We are indebted for 
the photograph to Mr. Hastings. 



GOERKE THE STAR OF NEW JERSEY CLUBS' MEET AT OLYMPIC PARK. 



WITNESSED by almost five thousand spectators, the 
Fall Meet conducted by the New Jersey Club, at Olym- 
pic Park, Newark, Sunday, the roth inst, was featured by 
Goerke capturing four events, and by his breaking the track 
record twice in one afternoon. Except for several annoying 
starting delays and some ill-advised handicapping, the meet 
was cleverly conducted by the Newark aggregation. The 
club has done so well this year that, having gained much 
experience in the art of managing motorcycle races, its offi- 
cers may be expected to provide a series of banner events 
next season. 

The four events in which Goerke defeated all of his com- 
petitors were the five-mile handicap, the Miss and Out, and the 
seven and ten-mile handicaps. The Indian rider first broke 
the previous track record in the seven-mile event, when he 
averaged 1.15 per mile. Subsequently, in the ten-mile handi- 
cap, he bettered this by one second, covering the distance in 
12.24, or at an average speed of 1:14. The best previous 
time was 1.19H, made by Goerke a month ago. In a two- 
mile match race Goerke was beaten by A. G. Chappie, of 
New York, by five yards. 

Howard O'Brien also did some fine driving. With a 
4 h. Indian, O'Brien took the three-mile open and the 
three-mile scratch, for club members only. The summaries : 



Three-mile open — Won by Howard O'Brien (Indian) ; 
second, A. C. Mercer (Indian) ; third, William James (In- 
dian). Time, 4:11. 

Five-mile handicap (48:50)— Won by Walter Goerke (In- 
dian) ; second, Percy Drummond (Indian) ; third, Howard 
O'Brien (Indian). Time, 6:13^5. 

Miss-and-out (48:50)— Won by Walter Goerke (Indian); 
second, William H. Wray (Indian) ; third, A. G. Chappie (In- 
dian). Time, 4-'33>i 

Match race (one mile)— Won by K. Moore (Excelsior). 
Time, i :42^. 

Seven-mile handicap (48:50)— Won by Walter Goerke, 
scratch (Indian) ; second, W. H. Wray (Indian) ; third, How- 
ard O'Brien (Indian). Time, 8:46. 

Three-mile scratch (30:59)— Won by Howard O'Brien (In- 
dian) ; second, H. C. Malcolm (Indian). Time, 4:15^5. 

Ten-mile handicap (48:50)— Won by Walter Goerke (In- 
dian) ; second, Howard O'Brien (Indian) ; third, W. H. Wray 
(Indian). Time, 12:24^. 

Five-mile scratch (48:50)— Won by Percy Drummond (In- 
dian) ; second, George Riechey (Indian). Time, 7:24^. 

Two-mile match race— Won by A. G. Chappie ( Indian) : 
second, Walter Goerke (Indian). Time, 2:38^. The distance 
of this event was four laps, or two miles. 



/^ H. HAMILTON, of Indianapolis, reports the following: 
^** "In checking over the endurance entries I find that F. E. 
Wilkinson, of Providence, R. L, entered as a private owner; 
but in tabulating the list he was classified as a tragic rider. 
I simply give you this information previous to the time the 
medals are given out so that you may be posted, and also to 
avoid placing Mr. Wilkinson in a false position." 

THE Stadium at Springfield has been carefully measured 
by a competent engineer and surveyor connected with the 
engineering department of the city of Springfield, who certifies 
that it is 1767 feet, 8 inches in circumference, measured 18 
inches from the pole, which makes three laps exactly 2$ feet 
over the mile. 



/~\NE of the most delightful trips over Jersey roads 
^ is a tour of the Orange Mountains, the route lying 
from Newark down Elizabeth avenue to Elizabeth, thence 
by way of Morris avenue to Millburn and the top of the 
mountains. The route then leads to Eagle Rock, where 
an excellent view of the city and surrounding towns can 
be had, and then home by way of Orange. The round 
trip is about fifty miles, and the roads are in excellent 
condition. 

DALLSTON SPA, N. Y.-A. M. Garrison, proprietor of 
*-* the Gilt Edge meat market, has purchased a four cylin- 
der Pierce, which is giving very satisfactory service; in fact, 
it has already become quite indispensable. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



TIPS AND TOPICS 



THE question of offsetting in twin cylinders has long 
been discussed in automobile circles, and many de- 
signers are embodying the offset cylinder theory in prac- 
tical construction. They all claim that there is a noticeable 
increase of power, though critics declare that the gains are 
very slight. However, the chief advantage to be claimed 
for this form of construction is that for a given length 
of connecting rod, the side thrust of the piston against 
the cylinder wall during the power stroke can be mini- 
mized. Again, where an engine must be designed with a 
minimum over-all height, it is possible to use a much 
shorter connecting rod for the same stroke length, with- 
out in any way increasing the maximum piston side pres- 
sure, if offsetting is used in the construction. Therefore, 
whatever is saved in side pressure of the piston against 
the cylinder walls can be added to the effort along the 
connecting rod, which adds to the power stroke. This 
form of construction has been followed in automobile 
practice both at home and abroad. I have seen it em- 
ployed in two well-known types of automobile water- 
cooled four-cylinder engines and in one opposed two- 
cylinder air-cooled engine. To my knowledge there is only 
at present one motorcycle with twin cylinders which are 
on the offset principle, this being the British Premier, 
which is a new arrival upon the market. In any event, 
it seems obvious that, in a twin cylinder motorcycle, by 
offsetting, it would be possible to construct the engine so 
that the rear cylinder would present a far greater cooling 
surface to the air than in its present sheltered position. 

Some More Carbureter 'Talk-Fest w — I have been two- 
speeding on a well-known brand of machine which needs 
no advertisement from my humble pen, as it were This 
luxurious mount was fitted with a free engine and two- 
speed gear, which acted like a charm. However, when 
one has a toy like this, I find that it is impossible to pre- 
vent oneself "playing at automobiles," that is, allowing the 
engine to run free while standing still for a short while 
and lifting the exhaust valve to act as a governor for 
the engine speed. On one such occasion as this I noticed 
that when playing this game the gasoline had a trick of 
overflowing from the top of the float chamber when the 
needle protruded. T have manufactured a small damper- 
cap for this and it has met with great success, as it pre- 
vents the needle joggling up too far, thus causing a waste 
of gasoline. 

From the number of carbureter inquiries which have 
come to us lately, I can see that, as a rule, the fault lies 
in the needle valve. Why not employ hard nickel or 
German silver — this would be "grindable" yet would prob- 



ably never require the application of such a tedious opera- 
tion. I also find that with many makes of carbureters, 
the game is not how to take them off the machine, but 
how to replace them. The springs of the inlet pipes and 
carbureter outlet invariably get out of register, so that it 
is a temper-trying job to get the union nut started on 
the right thread, and often one wastes much time at- 
tempting this simple form of assembly. If you take the 
first thread off each union the job is simple, as the nuts 
enter on the right thread immediately. 

With a twin, it is a good idea to put an extra air collar 
on the main outlet pipe of the carbureter where the pipe 
branches to the two inlet pipes to the engine. Few twin 
cylinders obtain enough air at high speeds, and the speed 
can be increased if the adjusting collar is made so that 
it will not jolt loose and utterly spoil the mixture. A 
slot can easily be cut in the pipe and a collar put over 
this, fastening the same with a thumb-screw or butterfly 
nut. This must be closed for starting purposes, but for 
speed work the required adjustment can be found, and 
set securely with the nut. Of course, when the machine 
slows on a hill, it is better to close this extra air hole, 
as the machine will take a steady pull better without 
it. Another method is to fit two small spring oil caps near 
the inlet valve on each inlet pipe and open these when 
occasion requires, but, of course, a finer adjustment can 
be procured by employing the former method. In the fall 
it will be found that very little extra air will be required 
except on very favorable days. 

Valve Topics, — We had a puzzling case in our "stable" 
the other day, after coming home from a long run. One 
of our little crowd was mounted upon a twin cylinder 
of reputable make. During the last 20 miles of the 
run the power had fallen off noticeably. We held an 
inquest over the jigger, but one brother (blessed be his 
name), suggested that we should have a sweepstake and 
draw lots, each to hove one shot at diagnosing the trouble. 
Luckily, I was last to try and I made a wild shot at the 
tension of all the valve springs and shipped four bright and 
healthy ones from the kit of spares. The effect was magi- 
cal. The machine fairly romped up and down the street 
and I was returned the winner of five merry "iron men" 
— all by a fluke, for nobody was more surprised than 
myself at the lucky guess. 

That Two-Cycle Discussion. — My merry confreres seem 
to have overlooked the true reason why the two-cycle 
type of engine has been successfully adopted in motor- 
boat construction. Perhaps it may be old news, but any- 
how I give it publicity. A high-speed engine is not effec- 




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tive for the purpose of driving a propeller. The two- 
cycle engine has been largely used because of its extreme 
adaptability to slow-running conditions. It may seem 
paradoxical to say so, but if one looks at the revolution 
per minute, not the number of explosions, it will be 
seen that the two-cycle engine can be more effectively 
run at slow speeds than any four-cycle, unless a large 
number of cylinders is employed. What is obviously 
required in two-stroke engines is one giving a perfect 
power impulse every half- revolution. Again, as has been 
shown, the mixture must not be taken into the crank case 
and thus mixed with dirty oil; this has been the greatest 
fault in most types now on the market. Moreover, when 
the gas is admitted into the crankchamber, any shake or 
wear in the bearings means leakage of compression and, 
unfortunately, most bearings have an evil trick of wearing 
in time. Besides we have the possibility of such leakage 
spoiling the mixture, which is a point not hitherto raised. 
Again, how about the level of oil? I question whether 
a varying level of oil would not affect the constant quan- 
tity of gas. Obviously, where an engine of perfect de- 
sign on the two-cycle principle would score would be in 
the matter of extreme flexibility, whereas the constant 
thrust would keep the parts in inseparable contact with 
each other. Careful balance of reciprocating weights and 
cylinder pressures would be absolutely necessary to attain 
this desirable end at all engine-speeds. 

To maintain the parts under constant load at all speeds 
the load on the piston would always have to be greater 
than the load due to the inertia of the piston even when 
the engine is not firing. The manufacturers of the British 
Scott engine, which has been dealt with in your columns, 
claim to have overcome this. First, then, it must be un- 
derstood that the cylinder pressure (due to compression 
of the charge) is required only to keep the piston under 
load at the end of the upward and during the beginning 
of the downward stroke; the load due to the resistance 
to retardation of the reciprocating weights is sufficiently 
great to maintain the thrust on the crankpin, although for 
nearly a quarter of a revolution the piston is under atmos- 
pheric pressure only. The Scott Engineering Company 
goes on to prove this by figures; but it is practical proof 
which is required in a matter such as this, and that proof 



will have to take the form of scores in hill climbs and 
long reliability trials, not to mention a low cost of up- 
keep, to compare favorably with any four-cycle engine. 

What to Do in Case of Fire. — I was out with a friend 
the other day and we came in for some excitement in the 
way of a fire. During the ride the union nut fastening 
the muffler to the exhaust pipe came adrift and the ma- 
chine started to "spit" through the slack portion. My 
friend is a remarkably careless rider and thus it happened 
that, at the same time the exhaust pipe got adrift, ihe float 
chamber of the carbureter was also leaking, and some 
gasolene must have dripped out upon the loose union, for 
the carbureter suddenly started a "serious conflagration" — 
as the daily papers say. The rider immediately laid the 
machine on its side, turned off the gasolene supply and put 
the fire out with his coat by smothering it. I have had 
this happen myself on a machine which had a carbureter 
placed in a low position. I can remember it once occurred 
outside a church on a Sunday evening just when the con- 
gregation were being dismissed from their devotions. I 
guess the incident was pointed out by the good people 
as a sign or prophecy of my future destination as a punish- 
ment for Sunday riding. Anyhow, the pained looks which I 
received gave me a bad misfire in my conscience for quite 
ten minutes. 

Another veteran. — I recently had a visit from a patriarch 
of the sport who would make even the "nomad" jealous of 
his grey hairs. This is a British visitor to our country, Mr. 
S. F. Edge. It may doubtless be remembered that Mr. Edge 
won the Gordon-Bennett Cup in the race from Paris to Vienna 
some years ago, driving the Napier car, which is so popular 
abroad. Like most successful car drivers Mr. Edge graduated 
from the schools of cycle racing and motorcycling. He was one 
of the earliest exponents of the De Dion motortricycle in Eng- 
land, and was successful in winning many races thereon. Na- 
pier, the designer of the car bearing his name, was also a road- 
racing man in cycling days and thus became associated with 
Edge, who has so successfully exploited the former's automo- 
biles. Mr. Edge often officiates at motorcycling contests on 
the other side. He is visiting the United States to study our 
manufacturing conditions, and was much interested in the ac- 
count I gave him of our growing numbers. 



SOME makers are careless in proportioning the diameter 
of valve stems and the bore of valve guides 
properly, so that whenever the engine gets thoroughly 
hot, the valve sticks a trifle in its guide. This accounts for 
some of those sudden stops we experience at times towards 
the top of a trying grade. The valve must run quite freely 
in its guide, and new valves often require a little thinning 
down. The spare valves should always be well tested for 
length and fit before an important run. 

Burred cotters are a fruitful source of delay on the 
road in valve repairs; the constant pressure of the spring 
on a soft cotter widens it out, and when the valve breaks 
or pits, the cotter is firmly jammed in its slot. I often 
reharden my cotters, especially for endurance runs. 

If broken valves become a common complaint with any 
machine, and the springs used are not unusually strong, 
it will pay to get a set of valves specially turned by a first- 
rate engineer. I can remember breaking three valves in 
a single day's run over very hilly country, just because 
I had screwed down my adjustable pulley to give me a 
low gear for the hills, and the valves were too light to 
stand the extra heat. 



The worst place to carry a spare valve is in the toolbag. 
It does not matter how you wrap it up in rag, it will crawl 
out and excoriate its faces against your files and spanners, 
and when you badly want it, you'll find it scraped and 
chunky about the jaw. I always strap a tiny pedal cycle 
toolbag to my handlebar, and reserve it for extra valves, 
wound in soft rag, and tied together in a bundle. 

A broken valve lifter is a tough proposition to face in 
one's salad days, especially if the cylinder has no petcock 
whereby compression may be released for starting pur- 
poses. I once smashed a patent metal rod lifter to smith- 
ereens by a sideslip in the middle of my holiday tour. 
I was up on the mountains, miles from a repair shop, 
and for the rest of that day I got going by putting a 
copper coin between valve and tappet and knocking it 
out with a wrench when I got on the run. Finally I came 
to a forge, where I drilled a hole in a coin, and attached 
it by a bit of twine to the cylinder. I got through the 
rest of that trip as jolly as a sand-boy, and ever since I 
have fitted a flexible wire valve lifter, and carry a pocket 
solderer's kit with which to mend the wire when it breaks. 



RF. MERIWETHER, who is nearing the end of his 
6,000-mile trans-continental journey from San Fran- 
cisco to New York, by way of El Paso, San Antonio and New 
Orleans, is now in Reading, Pa., spending a few days at the 
factory of the Reading Standard Company, makers of the 
machine which Mr. Meriwether is riding. From Reading, 
Meriwether will cut directly across the States of Pennsyl- 



vania and New Jersey, reaching Manhattan, his final destina- 
tion, some time next week. 

The story of Meriwether's remarkable achievement is now 
in course of preparation by the rider himself. It will be pub- 
lished in serial form in Motorcycle Illustrated, beginning 
with one of the November numbers. We are able to assure 
our subscribers that it will make interesting reading. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Vol. IV. 



OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



No. 20 



Published 

Twice a Month, 1st and 15th 

By the 

Motorcycle Publishing Company 



F. P. PRIAL, Pres. and Trw. 



JOHN J. DONOVAN, Sec 



Offices, 299 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Telephone, Worth 3691 



Home SabscriptiMs, SI.M Foreifi Saktcriptiaas, $2.* 
Siagle Copies, 19 cts. 

Entered as second class matter July 6th, 1908, at the Post O&ce 
at New York. N. Y.. under act of Congress, March 3, 1879- 

General Editorial and Business Direction 

F. P. PfclAL 



J. Leo Saues 
L. H. Cornish 



Editor 
Advertising 



5,100 

CIRCULATION THIS ISSUE 

BONA FIDE 

SOLD: NOT SAMPLES 



NOVEMBER 1st 

This Issue will Contain a Review of 

Motorcycling in the South 



NOVEMBER 15th 

Will Contain a Complete Story of the 

Atlanta Show 



A POPE MEMORIAL. 

THERE is going to be a Pope Memorial, a permanent 
monument to the late Albert A. Pope. That is, there 
will be a memorial, to "The Colonel" if we all do our duty, 
if we will give sentiment and generosity a chance and, for 
the moment, put aside self and greed. 

Here we had a great man, a man who was assuredly a 
genius, a man who, in his own particular field, ranks with 
the best of them. 'Tis true that he was merely a commercial 
man ; but genius also has a place in the markets ; in 
fact, business nowadays absorbs about all the genius there 
is going here in our America, and pretty much all over the 
world. 

And please note, too, that Albert A. Pope did not work 
solely for money, though he made millions and lost millions. 
His aim was to create things. His string of wonderful fac- 



tories in the beautiful city of Hartford tells the story of his 
energy. And they were not built merely to make things to 
sell, but to make the best things, to improve, to evolute. In 
each of these factories the experiment account was huge and 
the scrap heap was always sky high. For Pope, like all 
idealists, reached the high-water mark through a series of 
failures, occasionally punctuated with successes, But he was 
a big, strong, laughing fellow, so he forgot the failures, 
chuckled over his successes, and just kept telling the boys to 
"push on." 

Pope created the bicycle business; made it a great tiling; 
put all the world on wheels ; brought suit against the author- 
ities over Central Park, carried the thing to Albany, won 
out, and opened the park up to cyclists. He did not originate 
the good roads' movement, as has been stated; other men 
now unknown to fame deserve the credit for the idea. But 
Pope capitalized it, put his money into it and made a vital 
good roads' campaign possible. Such are a few of his public 
activities. In private he did many noble things. 

Colonel Pope died a few weeks ago a shade over 60 years. 
He left a beggarly million or two. Had he worked solely 
for money he would have left fifty millions. But he was 
never a squeeze-penny; on the contrary, he was always a 
giver, a spender, not a hoarder. He made the fortunes of 
many young men, men who had it in them to succeed. He 
did this by training and through personal inspiration. 

So we have got to have a memorial. All you old-timers 
must contribute to the fund. All cyclists and all motorcyclists 
must contribute. The people who knew "The Colonel" per- 
sonally surely will; and even those who never knew him or 
who have never even heard his name should not hold back. 
A dollar will do, more if you can spare it. There should be 
very few who will not forward a mite to perpetuate the 
memory of a truly generous man. 

This Memorial Fund was started by the Bicycling World, 
and very properly, too, it being the oldest and only paper in 
the cycling field. The idea at once met with general ap- 
proval. Already many people have contributed to ihe fund. 
For instance, the Consolidated Motorcyclists, of Keene. N. H., 
have contributed ten dollars. Will not other organizations do 
the same? Forward your subscription to us direct. Forward 
.it today, tonight. 

PHOTOS THAT ARE WORTH WHILE. 

WE have reproduced, on page 4 of this issue, four photo- 
graphs of the English Tourists' Trophy contest, the 
British Motorcycle Derby. It will be noticed that the sub- 
jects of these pictures are excellent, and the photographs 
themselves first class in every detail. These are the kind of 
pictures we want from American riders and enthusiasts, and 
of which we cannot possibly have too many. And in this con- 
nection, let us set forth our most important requirements re- 
garding photographs for reproduction in this paper. 

In the first place, they must be motorcycle pictures. Mere 
beauty or uniqueness alone does not adapt them to our pur- 
poses. They must have to do with the manufacture or opera- 
tion, on track, road or hill, of the motor-driven two-wheeler. 
It is true that we desire illustrated stories of tours awheel, 
but the pictures accompanying them should, if possible, em- 
phasize the fact that the trip was made on a motorcycle. 

Next in order of importance — if it be not more important 
than even the subject of the picture — is its photographic 
character. We cannot print poor pictures, pictures which are 
indistinct, blurred or otherwise spoiled. Some amateur pho- 
tographers seem to hold the delusion that, no matter how poor 
the original, the engraver and the printer are able to produce 
beautiful results. No doubt they accomplish wonders in this 
way, but their abilities are limited ; they are not omnipotent. 

We receive pictures every day; we would be dissatisfied if 
we didn't. They come from all parts of the country, all parts 
of the world, in fact, which is quite to our liking. We have 
written these few suggestions, then, not to discourage our 
thousands of interested friends, but, instead, to urge them to 



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October 15, 1909. 



further co-operate with us the end of improving the appear- 
ance of their favorite paper. They can do this by continuing 
to send os pictures, at the same time trying hard to obtain 
photographs the subjects and workmanship of which will be 
creditable to themselves and a source of "beauty and joy 
forever" to the other readers of Motorcycle Illustrated. 

IN commenting on the judges' report of the English 
Six-Day Reliability Run, B. H. Davies makes this 
important observation: "There is only one serious omis- 
sion in the report, and that relates to comfort, which is 
only mentioned in connection with big tires. Spring 
frames were conspicuous by their absence, and the most 
successful machines were not always comfortable. The 
spring fork on one make was cither screwed up till devoid 
of spring, or else required frequent lubrication. That on 
another make caused the rider's hands to 'dither* per- 
ceptibly and violently all day long, and clashed fright- 
fully over bumpy roads. Two makes of spring fork com- 
peting were so obviously and immensely superior to all 
the other brands that they certainly deserved special 
commendation. As the judges estimate that comfort is 
one of the four conditions needed to ensure a vast in- 
crease in the popularity of motorcycling, this omission is 
rather surprising. Every experienced motorcyclist will 
endorse their remarks upon the need of easy starting and 
the ability to climb steep hills under all conditions, both 
of which imply a variable gear. As a matter of fact, 
the easy starting was universal this year, and the hill- 
climbing notoriously bad. I think the fact that not a 
single machine proved chronically difficult to start might 
have been mentioned, as one of the great advances upon 
1908; and also the fact that what successful hill-climbing 
was witnessed was usually obtained by playing about 
with the carbureters, cooling down the engines, and either 
changing belts or adjusting pulleys. Few machines tackled 
the test hills on the run without preparation." 
* Jl 

NOT very long ago this paper published a striking 
picture of a winged motorcycle as one of the possi- 
bilities of the future. That we forecasted better than we 
knew is made plain from the following press despatch: 
"Paris. — Santos-Dumont says he expects in a few days to 
be able to use his aeroplane as a motor car along the 
road, rising at will and descending again to resume run- 
ning upon the ground. He believes that he will further 
reduce the distance necessary to traverse before rising 
to forty or fifty yards." 

Jl Jl 

WE dislike post mortcms, but at the same time we feel it 
fair to say this: The causes of any failure are many, 
with one big cause leading all the others. The one big cause 
in the Ovington failure was non-delivery. Another cause 
may have been that $4,000 a year store on Broadway. But in 
any event, let us all remember that it was a splendid store, 
and it was the best advertisement that motorcycling has ever 
had in New York City. 

Jl Jl 

THH handicapping at the Jersey State Fair race events 
last Sunday was bad, distinctly so. In the seven-mile 
event, the scratch man led the field at three miles and in the 
ten-mile handicap it was but little better. We have got to refine 
the game of handicapping. It must be made more equitable. 
Have any of you thought about the handicapping proposition? 
If so, we would be glad to print your thoughts in our next 



THE Slate Fair*, those classic events, arc having a great 
time just now with motorcycle races. When the races 
■ire called the spectators, to the tunc of thousands, forget 
the cows, clowns, thimble-riggers and so on, and crowd the 
rails to see the motorbike events. It's a splendid ad. for us. 



SHOW FIXTURES. 

Atlanta, Ga. — Nov. 6-13. Manager, S. A. Miles, 
7 East 42d Street, New York. 

New York- — Jan. 8-15. Manager, Merle L. 
Downs, 7 East 42d Street, New York. 

Chicago. — Feb. 5-12. Manager, S. A. Miles, 7 
East 42d Street, New York. 

Boston. — March 5-T2. Manager, Chester I. 
Campbell, 5 Park Square, Boston. 



JUST ANOTHER "FALSE ALARM." 

THE motorcycle trade, says the Chicago Post, striving 
onward and upward to a point where its product 
will be pianissimo and popular, is confronted with the 
industrious rumor that motorcycle riding is bad for the 
health. Where this notion had its inception no one 
seems to know, but that it is widespread there is no 
gainsaying. The steady jolting of the machine, it is 
gravely argued, is bad for the various organs, though the 
much more severe jolting received by the man on horse- 
back has been counted universally for health. 

It was about time, however, that some such hygienic 
bogy appeared to plague the new sport. Almost every 
popular pastime has been the target, at some time or 
other for similar criticism. A writer in the London Field 
recalls, in another connection, some of these exploded 
notions: 

"Allegations made broadcast of pneumonia from the 
ballroom, splayfoot from ladies' hockey, dementia from 
chess, ophthalmia from Alpine outings, lung disease from 
wool or crewel work, hunchback from juvenile violin 
study, ague from angling, elbow damage from lawn ten- 
nis, brain shaking from concussions of shooting — all have 
served in turn to raise panic and to make nervous folk 
doubt whether life is worth living." 

Marathon running and motorcycle riding are now going 
through a similar process, to survive like the others, it is 
probable, to a serene old age. 

Jl Jl 

ONE of the Newburgh, N. Y., enthusiasts is contributing 
to the Daily News there periodical patches of good 
stuff. Here is some of it: 

"Come, fellows; do you want some of us to fork up $10 
as an example just -because yeu persist in going up Broadway 
hill with your mufflers wide open? Newburgh policemen will 
give you a chance every time when you come home late in the 
dark without any lamp, provided you go slow and show a 
desire to get off the street as soon as you can or get your 
lamp. Why not appreciate a good turn by shutting Ac 
muffler and going slow through Broadway and Lander street? 

"Happy Paffendorfs 'mote* has bronchitis frequently. It 
'coughs' for quite a spell, then stops, and starts all over 
again. Great machine, though! Like a milkman's mare, it 
stops at every soda fountain, and trots fine coming home. 

"George Moore, Teddy Thomas, Herman Sager, Fred 
Ayers, Dudley Pope, Prof. Rupp are keeping mum these days. 
Bet they're saving on gasoline to buy 1910 models as soon 
as they're out. Another month yet before we need get 
anxious about 'what's what' for iqio." 
Jl Jl 

AN ounce of rubber, all ready for the tire maker, costs 
one-third as much as an ounce of silver, says an author- 
ity. So think of this when you feel inclined to cuss tire cost 
Jl Jl 

DENVER, Col. — Organized ostensibly to promote track 
meets, the Broadway Motorcycle Racing Company has 
just been incorporated here with a capital stock of $roucoa 



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ii 



GEORGE M. HENDEE BACK FROM HIS TOUR OF THE COUNTRY. 



George M. Hendee, president of the 
Hendee Mfg. Company, returned to 
Springfield on Monday. October 11th, 
after a six weeks' awing around the 
circle, which extended as far as the 
Pacific Coast. About this time of the 
year Mr. Hendee usually makes a trip 
of this sort, seeing all his big agents 
and sizing up things in general. There 
is an old French proverb which says: 
"The foot of the owner is the best fer- 
tilizer for the soil." That is also true 
of business. It is a very valuable thing 
for the Head Man to make at least an 
annual vinit to the people who are sell- 
ing his goods. This has a thousand and 
one advantages. Instead of being merely 



J. E. Hammond, of No. 71 Harrison 
street, Stapleton, S. I., will start on a 
trip of 18.500 miles in a few days. He 
has made a big wager that, provided only 
with such money as may be given him 
for souvenir postal cards which he will 
offer for nothing, he will visit the capi- 
tal of every State in the Union, the prin- 
cipal cities of Canada, England, Ireland, 
Scotland and Wales. The conditions of 
the wager are that he shall make the 
trip in nine months. 

From New York Mr. Hammond will 
follow the national highway to Atlanta, 
diverging in order to visit the capitals of 
the Southern States. 

Mr. Hammond is confident of his abil- 
ity to make the trip under the conditions. 
He once won a wager by making a trip 
from Canton, Ohio, to San Francisco, in 
120 days, and without taking any money 
with him. He will ride a Reading Stand- 
ard. 

C. K. Ball and 6. Bailey, riding Re- 
liance machines, won the double and 
single cylinder events respectively at 
the Bingham ton Exposition October 1. 
In the second race, C. K. Ball, of the 
Reliance Company, had an accident, as 
a result of which he slightly injured his 
leg and sustained a few body bruises. 

6. Feltman, Emblem agent in Albany, 
N. Y., sends us the photo, reproduced 
herewith, of the 9-years old son of Mr. 
A. Oanaday, a rural free delivery carrier, 
who lives in Nassau, N. Y. The lad, 
probably the youngest rider in the Em- 
pire State, is actually able to manage 
his fathers Emblem almost as well as 
the senior Canaday himself. 




a name and a title attached to a letter, 
the Head Man thus becomes to them a 
personal proposition. He gets to know 
his agents and they get to know him. 
Besides gathering much information of 
a general and personal kind, he is also 
able to smooth over many difficulties, 
to repair fences, etc. In fact, in many 
ways the grand tour is all to the good. 
From what we have observed, the 
Hendee policy runs about this way. In 
May and June the president of this 
company — which is rapidly becoming a 
great company — and his chief advisors 
think over the past season, what has 
been done and what has not been done. 
After much thought the plaDs for the 



Billy Chadeayne, of the Greyhound 
Motor Works, Buffalo, who is well 
known in American motorcycle circles, 
has just returned from an extended 
European pleasure tour on a Greyhound. 
He and a companion covered nearly 
4,000 miles in England, Ireland. Scot- 
land, France, Switzerland, Germany, Bel- 
gium and Holland. They were at 
Rheims with Curtiss the day he won 
the Great Champagne Cup, and they had 
many other pleasant experiences. 

After landing in Boston, Chadeayne 
rode his Greyhound back to Buffalo by 
way of New York. He had no engine 
trouble, nor in fact any other trouble 
aside from the minor incidents of the 
road on any such trip. 

It is notable that, with his single 
cylinder machine, Chadeayne was able 
to lead his friend's four cylinder up 
the long, hard grades in the Alps and 
elsewhere, some of the ascents being 
from 15 to 20 miles long. 

Interesting competition and some 
pretty fast riding characterized the races 
conducted by the Concourse Club, of New 
York, on the Motor Parkway last Sun- 
day afternoon. Downes, Harburger, 
Lessar and Heichel captured the honors. 
The summaries: 

Half-mile flying start (5 h. p.) — First 
heat, (1) J. Downes; (2), J. Heichel; 
time, .26. Second heat, (1) W. McClel- 
lan; (2), A. Kreuder; time, .26 4-5. 
Final heat, (1), J. Downes; (2), W. 
McClellan; time, .25 1-5. 

One mile, flying start (2% h. p) — (1), 
B. Lessar; (2>HP- Rosine; time, 1.28. 

One niile^ying start (3% h. p.) — 
(1), L^mrburger; (2), B. Lessar; (3), 
f. Sullivan; time, 1.18 3-5. 

One mile, match race (3% Indian) — 
(1), L. Harburger; (2), N. Feldstein ; 
time, 1:22 1-5. 

Free-for-all, one-half mile — (1) J. 
Heichel; (2), W. McClellan; time, .26 3-5. 

Half mile for special prize offered by 
L. Restreppo for fastest time. Won by 
J. Downes; time, .25 1-5. 

Charles W. Cole, of the Norton Auto- 
mobile Company, and Charles L. Fawcett, 
of Norton, were in Goodland, Kansas, a 
few days ago. They had ridden via 
Oberlin, a distance of 145 miles, in six 
hours. They rode Harley- Davidson 
singles, averaging over 24 miles an hour 
over country roads. 



coming year are then laid out. Then 
during the summer comes a bit of 
recreation, with attendance at some of 
the big road races, etc., and finally, 
about in mid -September, comes the big 
trip. Nothing has been given out 
about the results of the tour. Mr. Hen- 
dee is the hardest man in the world to 
interview ; he is not a giver out of things. 
But it is safe to guess that he found 
an abundance of Indian enthusiasm all 
along the line. His old plant was 
driven to capacity, and far beyond it all 
last winter, and, though he has doubled 
up on the plant, no doubt the entire 
wigwam will be ablaze many winter 
nights during the coming season. 



The defection of Jake DeRosier from 
the Indian folks on account of some 
recent unpleasantness has set all the 
racing sharps guessing as to what the 
great man will do. Rumor has it that 
he will immediately sail for Germany, 
tie up with the N. S. U. people, spend 
some time in their factory; also that 
the N. S. U. people intend to build one 
or more machines to DeRosier's specifi- 
cations. These are expected to be mar- 
vels of speed. Many folks doubt if this 
be true. Many other folks think he will 
return to the Hendee Manufacturing 
Company. The folks who think this 
base their opinion on the fact that the 
unpleasantness occurred while Mr. Hen- 
dee was on his trip to the Pacific Coast, 
and they rely on that gentleman's 
diplomacy, etc., to draw DeRosier gently 
back into the Indian fold. 



Among the spectators at the New 
Jersey meet was F. B. Widmayer, the 
well-known New York agent who, with 
a party, occupied a box. Mr. Widmayer 
is not one of those who talk gloomily 
about the outlook in New York. He says 
that, instead of going back this year, his 
business shows a fair and reasonable in- 
crease, both in new machines and in 
second-hands. Mr. Widmayer has ample 
capital and eternally keeps at it. He 
attends all the meets and has a large 
personal following. He is the agent who 
conducts his own personal Sunday runs, 
and more motorcyclists attend them 
than they do the regular club runs 
around New York. His business has 
increased to such proportions that he is 
compelled to reorganize his store, so as 
to give him more space. 



One of the figures at the New Jersey 
State Fair was John S. Prince, the track 
builder. He has become famous through- 
out the land and many of the lads gazed 
at him with awe, as they would at any 
phenom. At the Jersey meet he was 
a very imposing figure, and Jack carried 
'is walking stick, too. On Friday of this 
week he leaves for Los Angeles, where 
the racing season will be inaugurated on 
October 31. 

«* J» 

Two races will be conducted at Rome, 
Ga., Oct. 27. Both will be open amateur 
events. The first prizes will be a silver 
cup and speedometer, respectively. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 



SOME OF THE INVENTIONS OF 1909 



Gas Engine.— Edward J. Guliek, Misha- 
waka, In<L A two-cycle gas engine hay- 
ing a plurality of integral cylinders and 
a common crank chamber, a common 
inlet chamber haying a single opening 
for the admittance of a gaseous mix- 




ture, a plurality of ports in the cylin- 
ders for admitting the gaseous mixture 
and a by-pass communicating with the 
crank chamber and each cylinder, the 
common inlet chamber and by-passes 
being situated on the same side of the 
engine and formed integral therewith. 

Spring Pork.— Henry a Preston, Jr., 
FsHston, Md. The spring-controlled 
wheel-carrying mechanism is prvotally 
connected to the main fork and includes 




a supplemental fork; and a member 
rigidly secured to each branch of the 
main fork and provided with a pair of 
spaced guide rollers between which the 
adjacent branch of the supplemental fork 



loosely passes, whereby movement of the 
last-named fork relative to these mem- 
bers is permitted. There are also spring 
connections between the supplementary 
and main forks located wholly without 
the supplementary fork. 

Clutch and Brake.— Frederick S. EUett 
and Clayton E. Forsyth, Elmira, N. Y., 
assignors to Eclipse Machine Company, 
Elmira, N. Y. In a back pedaling coaster 
brake device, the combination with a 
rotary hub, of a driver; a brake anchor 
at one end of the hub held against ro- 
tation by attachment to the vehicle 
frame; an expansible split brake ring, 
nonrevolubly attached to the anchor; a 




sleeve within the brake ring to support 
the latter, this sleeve being nonrevolubly 
attached to the anchor, having a raised 
wedge formed on its surface, and adapted 
to move longitudinally with reference to 
the brake ring to expand it; and means 
operated by the driver on back pedaling 
whereby the sleeve is moved longitudinal- 
ly and its wedge means made to expand 
the brake ring. 

Power-Transmission Mechanism. George 
W. Sherman, New York, N. Y. In this 
device there is a hub having a threaded 
section, a threaded sleeve engaging this 
section, a driving gear loosely mounted 
upon the sleeve, a gear case, a planet 




gear carried by the case and interpolable 
between driving gear and sleeve, semi- 
circular clutch shoes, intermediate driv- 
ing gear and sleeve, a screw spindle cen- 
tered in the hub, a worm carried by the 
spindle, a worm nut engaging the worm, 
and means for operatively connecting the 
worm nut to the clutch. 
«* Jl 
Motor Attachment for Bicycles. — 
Gottlob Belz, Detroit, Mich. This motor 
is adapted to be detachably secured to 
the bicycle frame, having a rotatable 
member adapted to be secured in rolling 
contact with a tire of the bicycle, a fric- 
tion clutch having a set of drive mem- 
bers positively coupled to the motor, a 



set of follower members each in fric- 
tional engagement with a drive member 
and means adapted to detachably inter- 




lock the rotatable member with one or 
more of the follower members, and 
means positively coupling the motor and 
clutch drive members. There is a yoke 
adapted to be detachably secured to the 
frame of the bicycle, a spindle secured 
therein, a sleeve journaled on the spindle, 
a flange near one end of the sleeve, fric- 
tion rings each secured on the sleeve by 
bolts passing therefrom through the 
flange, friction collars each concentrically 
secured on a ring with its inner margin 
having lateral frictional engagement 
with the outer marginal portion of the 
ring, a roller journaled on the sleeve 
adjacent the rings, means adapted to de- 
tachably interlock the roller with one or 
more of the collars, and means for ro- 
tating the sleeve. 

Muffler. — Andrew S. Coles, Mamaroneck, 
N. Y. A muffler divided interiorly into 



*e , # ,, t 




three chambers, with pipes for conduct- 
ing the exhaust extending longitudinal- 
ly through the structure, each having 
perforations in one of the end chambers, 
a pipe connecting the two end chambers, 
and a pipe tapped into one of the cham- 
bers to which a horn or whistle may be 
connected, and insulating material sur- 
rounding the end chambers. 

Spark Plug. — Clinton Bateholts, Pitts- 
field, Mass. This plug comprises an an- 
nular externally screw-threaded metallic 
shell having a terminal extension at the 
inner end, an electrode rod arranged 
axially within the metallic shell, and 
having its extremities projecting beyond 



yxff S 




the ends of the shell, its outer one being 
screw threaded, the shell having shoul- 
ders in its internal wall and the rod hav- 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



13 



FOUND IN THE U. S. PATENT GAZETTE 



ing circumferential shoulders, with a 
body of plastic insulating material 
molded within and permanently engaged 
and interlocked with the internal 
shouldered wall of the shell, extending 
at both its extremities beyond the ends 
of the shell, terminating within the ends 
of the rod and molded closely around, 
permanently engaged and interlocked 
with, and supporting the electrode rod 
throughout the entire length of the 
molded plastic body, and having its pro- 
jecting portion located next to and ex- 
tended outwardly beyond the metallic 
shell made with a shoulder enlargement 
engaging the outer end of the shell; also 
a metallic collar engaged about the outer 
extremity of the electrode rod and rest- 
ing against the outwardly projecting 
end of the molded plastic body, and a 
binding nut screw engaged on the 
threaded extremity of the rod adjacent 
the metallic collar. 

Lamp.— Richard H. Welles, Kenosha, 
Wis., assignor to The Badger Brass Mfg. 
Co., Kenosha, Wis., a corporation of 



the air tubes, slotted lugs outwardly ex- 
tended from the opposite ends of the cap 
for engagement about the threaded 




Wisconsin. The combination with a suit- 
able casing, of a burner located inter- 
mediate the length of the casing, a main 
reflector in the rear portion of the casing 
constructed to reflect the rays from a 
focal point in approximate parallelism, 
and a movable reflector adapted to be 
interposed between the burned and main 
reflector to modify the reflected beam of 
light. The interior is cylindric, and the 
mirror is of the Mangan type. 

Tire. — Charles H. Keiffer, Akron, Ohio, 
The combination of a rim, an outer 
tube disposed on the same, a plurality of 
Inner tubes independently positioned 
within the outer tube, a perforated plate 
placed against the inner face of the rim, 
a plurality of air tubes extended from 
the inner tubes and terminated in the 
plate, threaded stems hinged upon the 
opposite ends of the plate, a cap having 
an air chamber formed therein engaged 
over the plate in communication with 




stems, nuts disposed on the stems for 
clamping the lugs in rigid position, an 
air inlet valve positioned in the cap, a 
plurality of independent air valves dis- 
posed in the ends of the air tubes. 

Rubber Tire Repairer.— James M. 
Padgett, Topeka, Kans. An apparatus 
comprising a hollow body having a 
plurality of faces of different con- 
tour to fit against 
the work, this 
body terminating 
at each end in a 
circular journal, a 
yoke having a cir- 
cular bearing and 
a s e m i-circular 
bearing whereby 
the yoke may be 
swiveled to the 
body at its re- 
spective ends, op- 
positely disposed 
perforated ears 
on the yoke, a 
binding yoke and 
thumb nuts to 
engage the per- 
forated ears, and 
suitable heating 
means insertable 
into the hollow 
body. 

Cycle Stand.— Henry T. Adams, Chi- 
cago, HI., assignor to Henry T. Adams 
Company. A cycle frame with an axle, 





rearwardly and upwardly and be sup- 
ported on the frame, and forwardly and 
upwardly projecting arms on the for- 
ward side so adapted that when the 
bottom of said member is swung down- 
wardly past the perpendicular it engages 
the side members of the frame. 




Puncture-proof Attachment for Tires. — 
Jesse B. Oatman, Riverside, Cal. An outer 
casing, an inner air tube, a ring between 
the tube and the casing formed from a 
thin sheet of metal, curved in cross sec- 
tion and having its ends lying adjacent 
to each other in the same plane, a flat 
sleeve completely encircling both of the 
ends with one of the ends sliding freely 
therein, and a canvas covering upon the 
ring and sleeve and secured thereto. 




a U-shaped member pivoted at its sides 
on the ends of the axle and adapted 
to be swung down beneath the frame 
to support the latter, and to be turned 



Front Fork — George H. Meiser, Chi- 
cago, 111., assignor to Excelsior Supply 
Company, a corporation of Hlinois. In a 
motorcycle, a handle bar, parallel tubular 
members attached thereto constituting a 
front fork, each member being slotted 
from its upper end downwardly for a 
certain distance; a supplementary fork 
with projections therefrom through these 
slots, springs within the members of the 
front fork to engage the projections. 



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14 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October IS, 1909. 



HERE AND THERE. 



THE SHOWS— A LIST OF THE EXHIBITORS. 



Ordinances that have been passed by 
municipalities for the regulation of the 
speed of motor vehicles, including motor- 
cycles, are declared to be invalid if the 
State Legislature has made adequate 
provision covering such cases, according 
to a decision rendered recently in the 
municipal court at Stevens Point, Wis. 
Three residents of that city were ar- 
rested on the charge of exceeding the 
speed limit of ten miles an hour, which 
was the rate fixed by a city ordinance. 
The State law provides for a limit of 
12 miles an hour in cities and villages 
and 25 miles an hour in the country dis- 
tricts, however, and the Judge dismissed 
the case, deciding that the State law 
supersedes the municipal law. It also 
developed that prosecutions must be 
brought in the name of the State and 
that the fines col'ected must be paid 
into the State treasury. 

& J* 

Danbury, Conn., had a big fair last 
week. One of the features was the 
motorcycle races held on Saturday, Oct. 
9. The big feature of the day was the 
riding of Stanley T. Kellogg, who cov- 
ered five miles on a heavy dirt track 
in 6:13. Fuller won the five-mile local 
race in 8:16; both rode Excelsiors. Dur- 
ing the afternoon Ray De Palma, who 
was entered in the automobile races, 
met with an accident, ran into a fence 
and was badly injured. De Palma was 
one of the biggest motorcycle racers, 
and it is said that he was the first man 
whom the Hendee Company employed 
to ride its machine. Several thousand 
people witnessed the events. 



About fifteen motorcycles, stripped of 
mufflers and owned by members of the 
Cincinnati club, were used to serenade 
Warren K. Kenning of the Union Trust 
building, who was married in Chicago 
recently, when he arrived at the home 
of his bride in St. Bernard. The noise- 
makers rode their machines quietly to 
the residence and after pushing them 
as close to the windows as possible, 
turned loose the engines. The newly 
married couple soon appeared at the 
windows and were given a handsome 
wedding present. 



The following is this year's A. C. U. 
definition of a touring machine, which 
may prove instructive to many in Ameri- 
ca to whom it is a conundrum: "Touring 
machines must be without pedalling gear, 
fitted with two brakes, tool -bag weigh- 
ing (with contents) not less than 5 lbs., 
motorcycle tires (not loss than 2 in.), 
metal mudgards (not less than 2% in.), 
touring motorcycle saddle, tank to hold 
not less than 1*4 gallons of petrol/' 

Stanley T. Kellogg has after all de- 
termined to remain in New York and 
has taken headquarters for the Excelsior 
Agency at 2312 Broadway. From this 
location he will operate in the several 
States in which he controls the Ex- 
celsior. 



New York Show. — The following firms 
have applied for space at the New York 
Show; the final allotments having not 
yet been made: Miami Cycle & Mfg. 
Company, Merkel-Light Motor Company, 
Pierce Cycle Co., Royal Motor Works, 
Emblem Mfg. Company, N. S. U. Motor 
Company, New Era Gas Engine Com- 
pany, Motorcycle Illustrated; Marvel 
Mfg. Company, Hendee Mfg. Company, 
Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Grey- 
hound Motor Company; Consolidated 
Mfg. Company, Aurora Automatic Ma- 
chinery Company, American Motor Com- 
pany. Reading Standard Company, Eclipse 
Machine Company, F. A. Baker & Co., 
and Bicycle World. 

Chicago Show. — The following appli- 
cations have been made for space at the 
Chicago Show: Hendee Mfg. Company, 
Excelsior Supply Company, Consolidated 



Mfg. Company, American Motor Com- 
pany, Harley-Davidson Motor Company, 
Reading Standard Company, Hornecker 
Motor Mfg. Company, Thiem Mfg. Com- 
pany, New Era Gas Engine Company, 
Pierce Cycle Company, Greyhound Motor 
Company, Merkel-Light Motor Company, 
Reliance Motorcycle Company, Bicycle 
World and Motorcycle Illustrated. 

Besides the above-named firms, the 
N. S. U. Motor Company, Wagner Motor 
Company and The Aurora Automatic 
Machinery Company have also applied 
for space. The Chicago Show Managers 
report that the space is just as limited 
as it was last year, and it is doubtful 
whether room can be made for these 
three firms. It is certain, however, that 
some arrangement will be made by 
which they will be able to secure space 
at the Show, through some concessions 
by the other manufacturers. 



A NOVEL SORT OF HONEYMOON. 



COME people dread the conventional 
^ formality connected with a wedding 
in which they are to be the principals, 
but do not know how to avoid it. We 
were married and had breakfast over by 
ten o'clock on June first. With some 
careful forethought we were able to slip 
away from that hungry looking lot of 
trick players and escaped through a side 
door. Just outside the hedge near this 
door was an innocent looking piece of 
canvas covering our 7 M. M. Twin with 
side car. 

I jerked at the canvas and tore it from 
the side-car and Elaine sprang into her 
seat; but the canvas was caught on the 
machine and there was no time now to 
loosen it. We were discovered! I made 
the quickest mount of my life. Down 
the street we tore with the canvas, with 
a crowd of yelling lunatics trying to 
catch us. It was really pitiful to see the 
look on the faces of those we left behind, 
and the carriage waiting for us at the 
door all bedecked with rags, old shoes, 
ribbons and tin pans. We both heaved 
a sigh. We were off alone on a two 
weeks' camping trip in northern Minne- 
sota. My dear reader, if there are any 
of the specie "luni maniacus" in your 
family and you contemplate marrying, 
do as we did. Your train fare alone 
would buy a side- car and pay for a 
camping trip. 

All of our equipment was with us. 
In the back of the side -car was an extra 
large basket which I can assure you was 
as wonderful as Alladin's lamp. Under 
the seat and strapped to the machine 
in various places were blankets, pro- 
visions, silk waterproof tent, air mat- 
tress, axe, fishing tackle and firearms. 
By one o'clock we had put fifty-four 
miles of beautiful country roads onto our 
cyclometer and had stopped for lunch. 

I opened the wonderful basket and 
brought forth a pint Thermos bottle full 
of ice-cold tea and a good lay-out. which 
I had had Bridget fix up on the side. 

The finest of New York's hotels could 
not boast such a setting. We perched 
on a ledge of rock overlooking the Mis- 
sissippi, feeling that we were doing 
something new and enjoying it. Around 
us lay a wilderness with nothing of civili- 
zation save this marvellous machine. Be- 



neath us we watched the Father of 
Waters wending its way down through 
the beautiful spring landscape. As 1 
looked over the machine for anything 
that might need attention I could not 
help marvelling at so wonderful an in- 
vention. There it stood as cold and im- 
mobile as a sphynx, yet when on the 
road a slight turn of the grip would 
make it fairly scream, while on the hills 
it tugged like a war-horse beneath us. 

Sometimes we would stop on the brow 
of some high hill to take in the surround- 
ing country, or in a cool shady wood be- 
side a spring. About four o'clock we 
stopped beside a restful trout stream, and 
in about ten minutes "Diana" had two 
elegant trout to my one. Our time was 
our own now and our home wherever we 
made it, so we decided to camp right there 
for the night. In a few minutes we had 
the tent stretched between two trees and 
pegged down with light steel tent pins, 
the mattress pumped full of real air, and 
the outfit unloaded generally. The fire 
was soon crackling and our aluminum 
outfit put to good use. This consisted of 
one fry-pan set into another; into these 
two cooking pots, then the coffee-pot 
containing cups, bowls, knives, forks, 
spoons, etc., all aluminum. It weighed a 
few pounds and took up very little space. 

Our wedding supper consisted of Erbs- 
wurst (pea soup), fried trout, bacon on 
the side, mashed potatoes (evaporated), 
biscuits baked in a collapsible tin re- 
flecting oven, and coffee. 

When the shades of night had fallen, 
and the katydids and crickets, and the 
soft breezes in the tree tons united in 
what seemed one grand wedding march, 
I clasped my wife in my arms and 
pointed with a start to something peer- 
ing at us through the pine branches. 
"There!" I exclaimed, "There it is." My 
little girl clung closer and asked in a 
frightened tone, <r What is it?" "Our 
honeymoon," I replied. — Edward V. 
Brewer, St. Paul Minn., in Sparks. 
<* Jt 

A. J. Williams, foreman of the job de- 
partment of the Ridgway (Pa.) Daily 
Record and Advocate, is the proud pos- 
sessor of a new Harley-Davidson, with 
the operation, comfort and speed of 
which Mr. William* is delighted. 



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October 15, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 

DETROIT CLUB MEMBERS WHO OFFICIATED AT RECENT RACE MEET. 



*5 




On Saturday, October 2nd, the De- 
troit Club gave a theatre party, fol- 
lowed by a dinner. About twenty of 
the members participated and all pres- 
ent voted the affair an entire success. 
It is the intention of the club to have 
an entertainment of this or some other 
sort each month this coming winter. 

The addresses of those who responded 
to the call of the toastmaster, Leo W. 
Banker, were appropriate to the occa- 
sion and well received, especially the 
one given by "Hank" Smith, who in- 
formed the club that during his infant 

Dallas, Tex. — Formal organization of 
the Dallas Club was effected September 
30th and officers elected as follows: 
R. A. Pickens, president; C. A. Cald- 
well, vice-president; E. D. Whorley, sec- 
retary; W. L. Ruff, treasurer; Olin 
Brandenburg, captain; Charles Herling, 
lieutenant. The club is affiliated with 
the F. A. M. It 8 colors are blue and 
orange, and they may be had upon ap- 
plication to W. L. Ruff, 396 Commerce 
street. 

The business session and organization 
was held in the parlors of the St. George 
Hotel, and followed a dinner. Twenty- 
three members were enrolled. Several 
enthusiastic letters were read from 

Seven Cheyenne riders have just com- 
pleted a long trip to Colorado Springs, 
Denver and other points in Colorado. 
Those in the party were Walter Stew- 
art, W. E. Fisher, N. P. Nelson, W. A. 
Wilson, W. T. Lee; Henry Mitchell and 
Iwao Fukishama. The last named is a 
Japanese boy, who has gained quite a 
reputation as a motorcyclist. 



days, devoted to the sport, someone ad- 
vised the flushing of the cylinder with 
kerosene, and "Hank," being "green" at 
the game, supposed that one was 
obliged to absorb the surplus kerosene 
from the cylinder with a rag poked 
through the valve ports. This he did, 
and before getting through with the 
job, was obliged to dismantle his motor 
to extract the rags, with which, in his 
enthusiasm to do the thing well, he had 
completely filled the cylinder. 

This club, which was organized in 
February, 1907, and incorporated in Feb- 

motorcyclists and organizations in other 
parts of the State, among them being 
one from the Fort Worth club, which 
promised its hearty co-operation in all 
matters of common interest, and par- 
ticularly with reference to the motor- 
cycle parade which is to be held in 
Dallas late this month. 

The objects of the club are to pro- 
mote the interests of motorcyclists, to 
arrange for century and interurban runs, 
races at the State Fair, and to co- 
operate to the extent of its ability in 
the matter of promoting good roads 
throughout Texas. 

The club is arranging a motorcycle 
parade for Friday, October 29, during 

Perce L. Adams, lieutenant of the Sy- 
racuse club, who left Syracuse recently 
for a 2,000-mile trip through the New 
England States, is home again, after hav- 
ing covered about half of his proposed 
itinerary. Mr. Adams found the roads 
of Maine so bad that he had to turn 
back, but as it was he covered about 
1,000 miles. 



ruary, 1908, is one of the largest of its 
kind in the States, and has among its 
members representatives and tradesmen 
of the largest firms in the country, who 
manufacture motorcycles, auto tires and 
accessories. 

The club rooms, located at No. 
20<t St. Aubin avenue, and large and 
well suited for their purpose, are being 
re- finished in preparation for the social 
activities of the coming season. All 
riders, or those interested in the sport, 
who can prove a good moral character, 
are cordially invited to join. 

the State Fair. The parade will be a 
decorative affair, and indications are 
that there will be between 300 and 400 
men in the procession. 

The decorations will be of two kinds, 
one tending toward the artistic and the 
other attempting to show the various 
uses which can be made of the machines. 
This is to include displays of the uses 
of the machine commercially, indus- 
trially and on the farm. Four prizes 
will be offered for the best displays. 

Marshal Keiller, of Woodridge, N. J., 
has bought a motorcycle in order to be 
better able to cope with speed law- 
breakers within his jurisdiction. 

Racine, Wis.— The local club has 
opened new headquarters and club rooms 
at 505 Monument square. The club has 
grown so rapidly that the old club rooms, 
located at 1819 Wisconsin street, be- 
came inadequate, and the more central 
location has been selected. It is the in- 
tention of the organization to erect a 
modern clubhouse next year. 



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16 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 




I send you herewith a view of a 4 
Indian tri-car with an equipment that 
has proved very satisfactory. The B. & 
C. two-speed gear has been attached only 
a short time, but so far has given ex- 
cellent results. The V-shaped notches 
in the quadrant did not hold the lever 
in the low speed position, consequently 
they were cut square and the triangular 
catch squared to fit. The supports hold- 
ing, the quadrant were drilled, tapped 
and screwed directly to the frame of the 
machine, as well as to the bands en- 
circling the same, in order to prevent 
slipping. The fastening which holds the 
end of the tension rod operating the low 
speed clutch was strongly attached to 
the frame by two screws, while other 
fastenings depending upon the friction 
of bands were also screwed directly to 
the frame, or to such other parts as they 
connected. 

The cylindrical battery case was re- 
moved, and a wooden box holding two 
batteries of three cells each was fastened 
in the fore car resting on the floor of 
the same. A Splitdorf automobile bat- 
tery switch was attached just back of 
the head of the machine, so that either 
battery could be used at will. 

Under the gas lamps are mounted 
Neverout oil lamps, regular bicycle size, 
which are convenient when one is riding 
in cities where gas lamps are not neces- 
sary. They show a red light in rear and 
serve also as tail lamps. 




The E. F. Ball Tri-car, With Two-speed Attachment. 



Regular Indian priming cups were in- 
serted in the usual place, but these will 
be replaced with small automobile cups 
of the usual pattern. The throttle has 
been arranged to clos*» to only one-half 
the regular opening. By opening the air 
valve to nearly its maximum, a very 
weak mixture is obtained, one which 
gives a smooth motion at a moderate 
speed, with spark fully advanced, and 
also saves about 25 per cent', of gasolene. 
The engine "picks up" and develops full 
power the instant the throttle is opened, 
provided the opening in air valve is cor- 
rectly adjusted. An effort was made to 
mix the lubricating oil with the gasolene. 
For the first thirty miles this worked 
well, but afterward resulted in most an- 



noying complications, and the practice 
was therefore discontinued. 

A fine assortment of supplies and tools 
is carried in the box under the seat, and 
a foot pump has been substituted for the 
small telescope pump in general use. 

It will be noticed that the mud guards 
have been removed from the front wheels. 
The mud, water, etc., are thrown clear of 
the machine, and very little dust is 
sucked up and carried along. A sheet 
metal shield on the right side of the ma- 
chine protects the feet and legs of the 
rider from the heat of the exhaust. I 
intend to conduct experiments with a 
view to obtaining a more delicate control 
of the throttle. 

Yonkers, N. Y. Edward F. Baix. 



It seems to me rather strange that 
nothing has come to my notice regarding 
the physical danger of pedalling a motor- 
cycle in a frantic effort to make the 
motor start. Do we not often see unfor- 
tunate riders exerting all their strength 
pedalling in a fruitless effort to induce, 
force or persuade an explosion in a 
motor? When those poor fellows finally 
quit pedalling they come to a standstill, 
completely exhausted. I have done this 
myself; I have pedalled a twin magneto 
machine until I was ready to drop. When 
you pedal your machine as I have at- 
tempted to illustrate, you do yourself 
great bodily injury. You greatly ag- 
gravate a disorder with which, in the 
words of one of the leading surgeons of 
the country, "ten per cent, of the young 
men of to-day are troubled." However, I 
wish it understood that I do not mean in 
any way to show that motorcycle riding 
is a menace to one's physical condition. 
But if you will in mind the following 
you may experience less starting trouble. 

It is always wise to start your motor 
while on the stand with the rear wheel 
free to turn, and to let it run at a mode- 
rate speed for about one minute; but do 
not let the motor "race." Then close 
your throttle and advance the spark 
about half way, which will help the 
motor to get hot without undue flame 
passing the exhaust valve. 

When you are ready to mount, the 
best and likewise the most graceful 
method of accomplishing this somewhat 
delicate feat is to do so with a running 



start, as has been explained in this pa- 
per, to the satisfaction of every one 
who would like to acquire the "stunt." 

If you choose to "pedal off" instead, go 
ahead and do so; but if your machine is 
equipped with battery ignition and 
doesn't start when you have pedalled 
about ten feet, dismount "instanter" and 
get busy with your thinker. 

Memphis, Tenn. G. D. T. 



Much interested in Mr. D. H. Webster's 
description of his ideal mount, I venture 
to make a few suggestions. In the first 
place, my ideal engine would be the 
Hedstrom twin, but with the cylinders 
set at an angle of 90 deg., as in the 
*'M. M." This would give the clean-cut 
action of the "Indian" with the smooth- 
ness of the "M. M.", and I am sure that 
if Mr. Webster has done any long-dis- 
tance riding, he will agree with me 
that the less vibration, the more satis- 
factory one's machine. 

Then, instead of a bevel-gear drive, 
which is all right for a four, but would 
not, I fear, stand the heavy explosions 
of a twin, unless extremely heavy, I 
would suggest two roller-chains, one from 
the engine to a two-speed gear, mounted 
on the countershaft, and the other from 
the gear to the rear wheel. The B. & C. 
drives through spur-gears on the low- 
speed, giving positive drive; but on high- 
speed the drive is throuqh a multiple-disc 
clutch, which gives a less "violent" ac- 



tion to the rear wheel, thus economizing 
on chains, rear tire, and the anatomy of 
the rider. The frame could be so de- 
signed as to have the pedal chain and 
both engine chains of the same length, 
width and pitch, giving the utmost in- 
terchangeability. Axtell A. Lloyd. 
Springfield, Mass. 



Permit me to express my unqualified 
endorsement of the views enunciated by 
Mr. Alfred H. Bartsch in his recently 
published article on "The Delights of 
Motorcycling." I can see absolutely no 
pleasure in riding or, rather, tearing 
along in grease -besmeared overalls, look- 
ing as though one had been shot out of 
a gun. 

I have a Pierce machine, the steady, 
even pull of which is a "delight to the 
soul," and I wonder why your paper has 
not more to say on the subject of four 
cylinders and the fact that they are 
practically noiseless. 

While it is simply wonderful how our 
manufacturers have caught up and, in 
many cases, passed the English makers, 
it is rather surprising that they have 
thus far failed to bring about certain 
improvements which are obviously ne- 
cessary. For example, I do not see why we 
have no rear spring forks. The general 
public bases its prejudice against the 
machine principally upon its noisiness 
and its excessive vibration. Eliminate 
these two faults first of all. 

Branford, Conn. F. L. Hammer. 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



17 



MAKERS 




SHOW SEASON TO OPEN AT ATLANTA. 



The Atlanta Auto Show is certain to 
be of considerable importance in stimu- 
lating the various motor industries in 
all sections. Atlanta is a thousand miles 
from New York, a great big city, a 
breezy, bustling city. Years ago they 
used to call it The Chicago of the South. 
It is headquarters for its own State, 
Georgia, and this show will also draw 
people from Kentucky, Tennessee, Ala- 
bama. North and South Carolina and 
Florida. In the territory included in 
two or three hundred miles from Atlanta 
there are many good -sized cities where 
motorcycling has already taken hold. 
There are several agents in Atlanta, 
also in Athens, Ga.; Rome, Ga.; Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn.; Louisville, Ky.; Jack- 
sonville, Fla.; Augusta, Ga., and in many 
other of the smaller towns. 

Among other big cities that will send 
agents and sightseers to the show to see 
the cars and motorcycles, are Wilming- 
ton, S. C; Columbia and Charlotte, S. C; 
Savannah, Macon and Brunswick. Ga. ; 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Montgomery, Mobile 
and Birmingham, Ala.; and Memphis and 
Nashville. Tenn. All these are good, live 
cities and headquarters in their respec- 
tive territories. 

For the show the following manufac- 
turers have taken space: Hendee Manu- 
facturing Company, Excelsior Supply 
Company, Consolidated Manufacturing 



Company, Greyhound Motor Company, 
N. S. U. Motor Company, Harley-I>avid- 
son Motor Company and the Wagner 
Motor Company. Besides the manufac- 
turers many o; the accessory folks will 
be on deck. Among them are the Badger 
Brass Manufacturing Company, Fisk 
Rubber Company, Veeder Manufacturing 
Company, B. F. Goodrich Company, Har- 
ris Oil Company, Jones Speedometer 
Company. Connecticut Telephone & Elec- 
tric Company, C. F. Splitdorf, Emil 
Grossman Company, Vehicle Apron & 
Hood Company and many others. Also 
every tire manufacturer in the country 
will have its tires on exhibition 

The date of the exposition is Novem- 
ber 6 to 13. It will be held in a fine 
building and the whole town is back of 
it. More than $15,000 has been con- 
tributed to the Entertainment Fund, and 
an invitation to attend the show has 
been sent to all the garasje proprietors 
and motor dealers in Maryland, Virginia, 
West Virginia, North Carolina. South 
Carolina, and in fact all the Southern 
States. In addition to this, 1,100 invita- 
tions have been issued to the carriage 
dealers in the >Sbuthern tier. It is point- 
ed out that the Southerners have har- 
vested their crops and are in receipt of 
$120,000,000. In fact the entire South 
is reported to be in good shape, and this 
should greatly increase the buying power. 



Herewith is an R.-S. van in use for the 
delivery of meats and provisions by Mr. 
Wheelwright, of Danvers, Mass., who 
claims that his telephone orders have 
doubled since he installed the van, al- 
though the expense of running it is noth- 



ing as compared with the keeping of a 
horse. Besides, the van does the work of 
three horses. Inquiries regarding the 
van are pouring in to W. J. Walker & 
Co., the local agents, and they expect to 
do a big business in vans next year. 




A $700,000 CONCERN. 

Minneapolis. — The Northwestern Auto 
and Motorcycle Company is about to be 
iormed to take over the business of the 
Minneapolis Motorcycle Company, manu- 
facturers of the Minneapolis two-speed. 
The promoters are capitalizing the com- 
pany at $700,000, which will make it the 
largest capitalized automobile and motor- 
cycle manufacturing corporation in the . 
Northwest. 

The company has contracts with a 
well-known financial agent to underwrite 
the stock. Fred W. Starn, of the Auto 
Exchange, formerly Northwest agent for 
the Hupmobile, and before that superin- 
tendent of the White Steamer Company 
factory at Cleveland, will design the Min- 
neapolis automobile and will be the fac- 
tory manager. 

Even without the addition of the au- 
tomobile business, the company would 
have had to enlarge its plant to take care 
of the motorcycle demand for 1910. The 
site of the auto exchange at 522 S. Tenth 
street and the present factory at 517 S. 
Seventh street will be devoted to the 
manufacture of motorcycles, and it will 
be necessary to contract for a large site 
for the automobile factory. 

The Northwestern Company, directors 
are J. M. Michaelson, A. L. Kirk, F. W. 
Starr, George H. Wilson and W. E. 
Michaelson. 



N. Y. TRADE DEPLETED. 

The ranks of the New York motor- 
cycle firms have recently been depleted 
to some extent. The Clement Motor 
Equipment Company, which made a 
motor attachment for bicycles, has 
silently vanished. The members of this 
firm were Howard Wray, the well-known 
racing man, who is living at 94 Decatur 
street, Brooklyn, and J. EMiott, who 
lives at 1485 Fulton street, also Brook- 
lyn. A few months ago Mr. Elliott wmt 
into this company and wrote letters to 
all the creditors, stating that he wojuld 
assume all the debts ; but , t the business 
is closed up and there is no'tmng doing. 

The Lyons Motor Company have quit 
and their store is now occupied by the 
McLaughlin & Ashley Motor Company. 
The Prospect Motor Company have also 
quit, because of lack of capital. The 
members of this firm were George Post, 
who is reported to be living up in New 
Canaan, Ck>nn.,*and John McGerken, who 
is said to have obtained .a position as a 
chauffeur. The Lyons Motor Company 
quit in good order, being good busiriess 



Brazenor & Rudennan, 849 Bedford 
avenue, Brooklyn, have just secured the 
Excelsior agency, and expect shortly to 
have 1910 models for demonstration. 



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18 MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED October 15, 1909. 

THESE MACHINES ACCOMPANY THE AUTO OF THE PRESIDENT. 




T. N. Mudd, Jr., Washington (D. C), 
agent for the R-S., advises us that he 
recently delivered to the Capital City 
police department two 4 h. Reading 

THE GOODRICH BUILDING. 

The B. F. Goodrich Company has just 
finished, in New York, a most admirably 
equipped building for handling rubber 
products, especially tires. The structure 
is a notable addition to the business 
buildings in its neighborhood. It is 
numbered 1780-1782 Broadway, and has 
an "L" of almost equal size at 225-227 
West Fifty -seventh Street. There are 
twelve floors and a basement, the latter 
being used entirely for the storage of 
auto tires. The rear of the ground floor 
i* a receiving and shipping room", and the 
front a large salesroom, which has been 
very effectively done in mahogany. 

On the second floor, looking out on 
Broadway, is the reception room, with 
large, easy chairs, smoking tables, and 
convenient writing desks. The finish 
here is fumed oak. A rear room is re- 
served for the solid tire storage and for 
repairing. 




Standard machines for the use of Presi- 
dent Taft's private body guard. The 
photo shows the White House garage, 
the machines and the two officers who 



The eighth floor has been given over 
mostly to offices for the manager and 
salesmen. In the rear is a store-room 
for mechanical rubber goods. Above, on 
the ninth floor, are general offices for the 
clerks. The next floor, for the company's 
use, is the eleventh, a large stock room 
for specialties such as druggists', sur- 
geons, and stationers' rubber sundries. 

No mechanical device for the ready 
handling of stock has been omitted. 
There are special automobile elevators, 
one of which has a turn-table floor. 
There is also a general freight lift, two 
passenger elevators and an electric 
dummy waiter, adjusted to stop auto- 
matically at any floor. 

The exterior of the building is con- 
structed of white and green marble, with 
bronze capitals and decorations, for the 
first two stories. Above this, the mate- 
rial is pressed brick with white stone 
trimmings. 

Mr. W. H. Yule is general manager, 
with Mr. H. C. Miller in charge of the 
auto tire department. 

"Auto-Bi," a good, old name, borne by 
one of the most reliable machines ever 
made, is now but a memory. Insofar as 
the machine itself is concerned, it was 
some time ago superseded by "Grey- 
hound, a much better title. But, until 
recently, the hyphenated word was ap- 
plied to the firm itself. Now, however, 
everything is Greyhound — both machine 
and makers. The latter, formerly the 
Auto-Bi Company, are now known as the 
Greyhound Motor Works. Their address 
is the same, viz.: Buffalo, New York. 

v* v* 

F. E. Starr and E. P. Lake, of Chicago, 
recently returned from a trip to St. 
Louis, which was most successfully 
made on Merkel machines. Both speak 
very enthusiastically of the Merkel 
spring fork and its ball-bearing motor 
which, according to Mr. Starr, "seemed 
to have any amount of power and speed." 



use them. These machines are "on the 
job" every day when the President is in 
Washington, and follow his automobile 
everywhere. 

NEW N. S. U. AGENTS. 

The Milton W. Arrowood Co., the 

newly appointed N. S. U. agent for At- 
lanta and the entire State of Georgia, 
has taken space at the Atlanta Show, 
where it will exhibit a full line of N. S. 
U. touring models, etc. 

An agency has also been established 
in Hillsboro, Texas, where L. C. East- 
land will further the N. 8. U. interests. 

James A. Griffin, who is traveling in 
the South for the same company, in- 
tends to visit several county and State 
fairs in Texas, Arkansas and Georgia. 
He is taking with him a 6 h. N. S. U. 
racing machine, on which he will give 
exhibitions. 

J* Jt 

It is reported that the American Mo- 
tor Cycle Company, 407 Wells street, 
Chicago, will turn out an extremely light 
weight motorcycle for 1910, and that the 
B. F. Goodrich Company will make a 
brand new belt. It is also reported that 
the Pope Manufacturing Company of 
Westfield, Mass. — no connection of the 
Pope Manufacturing Company of Hart- 
ford — will have a motorcycle on the 1910 
market. The Puch Import Company is 
looking over New York territory for an 
agent to handle the Puch product for the 
entire country. 

<* Jt 

Mr. W. F. McGuire, manager of the 
Consolidated Manufacturing Company 
since, May, 1906, has resigned to accept 
a position with the Ford Motor Com- 
pany, and will take up his new duties 
November 1st. The Consolidated Manu- 
facturing Company will be operated by 
D. J. Welsh, W. G. Alcorn and A. B. 
Coffman, who have ably assisted Mr. 
McGuire in building up the business to 
its present magnitude. 

Jt & 

The Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory, 
of Chicago, well known for its coils, has 
a magneto nearlv rcadv fer the market. 



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October 15, 19C9. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



19 



A motorcycle tonneau, cushion-spring, 
tandem attachment, has been placed on 
the market by A. W. Duck, 427 Fifteenth 
street, Oakland, Cal. It carries an extra 
rider without any jolt or jar. It is ad- 
vertised in our Mart Department. If 
interested, write Mr. Duck for particu- 
lars. 

The Motorcycle Equipment Company, 
of Hammondsport, New York, will move 
into a big new plant shortly. Previous 
to this, they are going to clear out a 
lot of old stock, just "shopworn" stuff. 
They announce this fact in this issue. 
They state that they are almost giving 
machines away. 

Mr. W. 6. Shack, head of the Emblem 
Manufacturing Company, Angola, N. Y., 
who was in New York last week, stated 
that in all likelihood the entire 1910 
Emblem line would be equipped with 
the Eclipse free engine device, which is 
built into the engine pulley of belt- 
driven machines and, being very simple, 
has been tried out with marked success. 

Another interesting announcement by 
the same company is to the effect that 
it has added a seven horse power ma- 
chine to its present number of models. 
The big Emblem twin will be sold at 
$250, magneto ignition, $25 extra. The 
price of the 1910 3% horse single will 
be $200, and that of the 4 horse single, 
$225; magneto ignition, as in the case 
of the twin, $25 additional. 

The residents of Fort Dodge, Iowa, are 
much interested in the side-car made and 
used by the Peeler Brothers, local Wag- 
ner agents, who write that they wouldn't 
be without the attachment for anything. 
Messrs. Peeler are well known as the 
sons of an inventive father and are 
themselves inventors of no mean ability. 
They have operated motorcycles for 
some time and when they saw their first 
tri-car, they Bet to work to construct 
one of their own. 

The chair will be seen to be the upper 
portions of a willow rocker; the third 
wheel is from a bicycle; the guard is 
from an old buggy; there is a spring 
somewhere under the seat that was taken 
from some vehicle; the foot board is con- 
structed out of some ancient article and 
covered with a piece of rubber from an 
automobile footboard, and there are a 
number of other interesting pieces "with 
a history" that go to complete the ma- 
chine. 



THE 1910 N. S. U. SPECIFICATIONS. 




Announcements of the specifications of 
1910 models are already being made. 
Several have already been published, in- 
dicating that the trade is determined 
to be better fitted than ever before to 
satisfy the popular demand on time and 
otherwise in a thoroughly systematic 
way. 

The accompanying cut shows both 
sides of the 1910 3 h. twin motor 
manufactured by the N. S. U. Motor 
Company, of 206 West 76th Street, New 
York, and applied to its twin Roadster. 
This motor has its two cylinders set at 
an angle of 45 degrees; however, when 
the motor is set into its loop frame, the 
rear cylinder is upright, thus fixing the 
forward cylinder at an angle of 45 
degrees from the vertical. This allows 
the cooling flanges of the forward cylin- 
der to come below the line of those of 
the rear; consequently the latter re- 
ceives a cooling draught of its own. In 
addition a radical change has been made 
in the cooling flanges of the forward 
cylinders, as they run horizontally across. 
The flanges are cast directly on the cylin- 
ders, and not sweated on separately. 
They are square, instead of the usual 
circular type. 

The cylinders are made of special cast 
iron, which is accurately ground in by 
hand, after which they are subjected to 
a hydraulic test for sand or blow holes. 
The exact measurements are: Bore, 
2 1-64 inches; stroke, 2 15-16 inches. 

The pistons are of the regular N. S. U. 




type, containing four rings, three at the 
top and one somewhat lower down, the 
latter holding the gudgeon pin in place, 
thus doing away with bolts and set 
screws. The connecting rods are of the 
scissors type, containing at the lower 
bearing phosphor bronze bushings, while 
for the piston bushing a special steel is 
used. 

The valves are all of extra large radius. 
The inlet valve is actuated mechanically 
by overhead tappets controlled by push 
rods operated from underneath the ex- 
haust valve tappet. Both tappets are 
raised by one cam, the former resting 
on ball bearings. 

Lubrication is by a force feed hand 
pump, all bearings being kept lubricated 
by a series of scientifically constructed 
by- passes. Ignition is of the jump spark 
type, by Bosch H. T. magneto, which 
sets in a well protected position and is 
securely fastened to the crank case. It 
is driven by case hardened steel sears 
directly connected with the motor shaft. 

The driving mechanism is of the un- 
dergeared type, that is to say, the crank 
shaft is fitted with a toothed gear which 
meshes with the belt pulley. The latter^ 
inside periphery is also geared and runs 
on a bearing of its own, which is further 
attached to a steel sliding plate held in 
position by a vertical worm gear, allow- 
ing the belt tension to be altered while 
one is riding. 

This method of undergearing allows a 
larger driving pulley on the motor and a 
smaller on the rear wheel, thus keeping 
the belt well away from mud, dust, etc. 
At the same time, owing to the fact that 
the pulleys are nearer an equal size, the 
belt gives much more satisfaction, both 
in length of life and transmission power. 

Several deliveries of 1910 models have 
been made and the N. S. U. Company is 
prepared to fill orders immediately. 

San Antonio, Tex.— The makers of the 
Armac have a hustling agent here in the 
person of R. C. Crist, who is making 
the most of the wonderful boom which 
the motorcycle is experiencing in the 
Lone Star State. 

A leather tire for motorcycles is about 
to be placed on the market by the King 
Leather Tire Company, Milwaukee, Wis. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 






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ANOTHER GR 



H 



G & J MOTOI 
1089 Miles 1! 



That was the remarkable record made 
cycle equipped with Indianapolis G & J Til 

Chas. Gustafson was a close second, 
G & J Tires. 

Neither Spencer or Gustafson experia 
the rear tires, which disintegrates rubber ai 
rear tire once during the 24 hours. After 
simply a precautionary one as neither of th 
machines were never touched during the enl 

Mr. Spencer also used G & J Tires in 
cing no tire trouble whatsoever. 

The tires have a great deal to do with the winning of track records and the making o 

anything but Indianapolis G & J's. That's why G & J Tires hold all the World's Records- 

If you are not acquainted with G & J Motorcycle Tires let us send you our booklet i 




Kansas City 

Cleveland 

Pittsburg 



Los Angeles 
Atlanta 
St. Louis 



B 08 ton 

Portland 

Omaha 



G & J TIRE COMP 



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October 15, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 21 



« 



EAT VICTORY 



)R 



?CYCLE TIRES 

39 Yards in 24 Hours 

by Chas. S. Spencer, at the Springfield Stadium track, on an Indian motor- 



s. 



covering 1 043 miles and 1 99 yards in the 24 hours. Gustafson also used 

:ed a particle of tire trouble. On account of the continuous spray of oil on 
1 destroys its elasticity, each rider, as a matter of precaution, changed his 
he rear tires had been removed it was clearly proven that the change was 
tires showed any weakness, and very little wear. The front tires on both 
e distance. 

the F. A. M. Endurance Run in which he made a perfect score, experien- 



erfect scores in Endurance Runs. Experienced riders know this. They take no chances on 

that's why they have won all the F. A. M. Endurance contests. 

iwing the various styles, also our line of useful sundries (or the motorcyclist. 



iNY, Indianapolis, Ind. Detroit ■«»-«-•• pm-**. 



Minneapolis New York Buffalo 

Detroit San Francisco Philadel 

Chicago Denver Toledo, O. 



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22 MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED October 15, 1909. 

VETERAN RIDER ENTERTAINS OVER A SCORE OF HIS CHICAGO FRIENDS. 




Line-up of Mr. Freeman's Guests— Mr. and Mrs. Freeman On An Excelsior. 



Dr. W. Bt Freeman, of Crystal Lake, 
111., a purchaser of one of the first Ex- 
celsior Auto-Cycles, appreciates his ma- 
ohine, not only from a standpoint of its 
utility, but also from the pleasant as- 
quaintanoeships its riding has produced. 
To show this appreciation, a year ago 
he invited a number of the Chicago Ex- 
celsior riders to partake of his hospital- 
ity at his home at Crystal Lake, and on 
that occasion eleven Chicagoans made the 
trip and partook of a fine dinner. 

This year he decided to break all 
previous records, and the invitation list 
was numerically over twice that of last 
year. Twenty-five members of the clan 

At a recent meeting of the Western 
District, Federation of American Motor- 
cyclists, at the headquarters of the In- 
diana club in Indianapolis, J. C. Rock- 
erts, of Indianapolis, was elected treas- 
urer, and & F. Ball, also of Indianapolis, 
secretary. 

Rules and regulations very similar to 
those of the Eastern district were 
adopted. It was suggested by one of 
the members from Cincinnati that Ken- 
tucky saould be placed in the Western 
district owing to the fact that a large 
number of members of Cincinnati clubs 
live in Kentucky, while quite a number 
of ' Louisville club members live in In- 
diana. 



Some of Detroit's dyed-in-the-wool joy- 
riders took a trip to Pine Lake, a week 
ago Sunday, returning via Pontiac — a 
total of about sixty miles. There were 
fourteen in the party. Between quick- 
sand and a plank road, consisting mostly 
of missing planks, things were interest- 
ing. While ?°in<? around a turn in the 



Excelsior gathered at the retail store of 
the Excelsior on Michigan avenue, Chi- 
cago, at 7 o'clock Sunday morning, the 
3rd inst., and arrived at Crystal Lake a 
little after eleven o'clock — that is, all 
but the one who ran astray. Here they 
met with a hearty welcome. 

Mrs. Freeman, who is herself an en- 
thusiastic participant in many of the 
Doctor's travels, threw open her house to 
the hungry horde and they proceeded to 
shed dust all over the establishment. By 
the time the boys were cleaned up and 
in presentable condition the dinner was 
announced, and did they go at it ? Well, 
some! 

The Doctor, who, when he can find time 



road Butler hit a dog. A stout post was 
the only thing that saved Jim and his 
joy -bus from going into a six-foot ditch. 
He was a doleful sight as he sat in the 
middle of the pike. 

At Pine Lake, by way of variety, 
Hunter tried riding a pony bare-back. 
The cay use promptly threw him off. Roy 
said he wasn't used to such a short 
wheel-base. Two of the boys were 
caught by country marshals for not hav- 
ing State licenses. The only mechanical 
troubles were a puncture, commutator 
spring adjusted, and a couple of bent 
cranks. 

A new law affecting motorcycles goes 
into operation in Michigan Jan. 1, requir- 
ing the payment of a $3 license fee. 
Hereafter licenses will expire the first of 
the vear. 

& & 

At the last meeting of the Linden 
Club, of Brooklyn, the following officials 
were elected: President, Harold Fletcher ; 
vice-president, F. W. Scharen; treasurer, 
Argyle Pollock: secretary, Walter Sav- 
ery: captain. W. E. Finley. 



between his lucrative country practice 
and the motorcycle, is also an enthusias- 
tic sportsman, had levied tribute on 
Crystal Lake and the surrounding 
marshes, with the result that the leading 
feature of the dinner was a choice col- 
lection of Mallard and pin-tails, roasted 
and stuffed in a way that would meet 
the approval of the most hypercritical. 
There was not a jarring note in the 
day's events, even the weather having 
been apparently made to order, and it 
may be safely stated that Dr. Freeman's 
duck dinner will be a topic of conversa- 
tion and pleasant memory on the part 
of twenty-four appreciative members of 
the Excelsior clan for a long time. 

The following were appointed: First 
lieutenant, Ellsworth Bennett; second 
lieutenant, W. Savery. Board of gov- 
ernors — W. E. Finley, Ellsworth Bennett, 
Frank Miller and Wm. Berman. 



The Consolidated Motorcyclists, Keene, 
N. H., are about to move into new 
headquarters. At the annual meeting 
of the club last week a new set of offi- 
cers was elected as follows: President, 
G. W. Scott; vice-president, Fred S. 
Morse; secretary, Elliot Willard; treas- 
urer, Leon Allen; executive committee. 
Harry C. Dean, 0. C. Wilber and G. Fred 
Little; captain, G. Fred Little; first lieu- 
tenant, H. C. Dean; second lieutenant, 
Clinton F. Harder. 



The Houston Light and Power Com- 
pany, recognizing the necessity of get- 
ting a repair man to the scene of a fire 
or other trouble immediately, has pur- 
chased two Excelsior machines from 
C. L. & Theo. Bering, Jr. 



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October 15, 1909. MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 23 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



To Manufacturers 
of Motorcycles 
Jobbers and Dealers 

fl We are now in a position to make immediate delivery 
of Motorcycle STANDARD CLINCHER STEEL RIMS 
in all sizes, punched and countersunk as requested. 

fl We are the largest factory in the United States devoted 
exclusively to the manufacture of Rims. 

€J Our rims are made somewhat stronger than those 
formerly used. 

flAll bur rims are inspected by and bear the stamp 
of the Rim Association as standard. 

Samples will be Sent on Request 

WE ARE CARRYING A LARGE STOCK OF COMPLETE SIZES 
IN NEW YORK AND CHICAGO FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



American Stepney Spare Wheel Co. 

1773 Broadway New York 



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24 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 



BELTS— HOW TO OBTAIN THE BEST RESULTS 

By Alfred H. Bartsch. 



I know from the many orders and let- 
ters we have received that there will be 
a big demand next season for rubber and 
canvas belts. This year the rubber belt 
has practically been in embryo, as far as 
this country is concerned, and yet those 
who have tried them have, almost as a 
whole, declared that there is no better 
type of transmission. 

Many chain enthusiasts, and they are 
particularly stubborn, have come over to 
the rubber belt, and acknowledged them- 
selves converted. There seems to be a 
Pullman car ease to the motorcycle so 
equipped, as the motor pulsations, which 
are transmitted to quite some extent on 
chaine drive machines, are wholly elimi- 
nated 'by the use of a belt, particularly 
the rubber and canvas variety. 

Of course, rubber belts do not wear as 
long as the leather ones, or as long as 
a chain, but one must consider that dur- 
ing their life they give no trouble what- 
soever, if they are properly treated. We 
receive complaints now and than in re- 
ference to belts, but I believe that as 
soon as the boys become better 
acquainted with the new transmission, 
and learn to treat their belts properly, 
the rubber belt will ibecome exceptionally 
popular, because this transmission is so 
simple. The belt can be lengthened or 
shortened, or repaired when broken, very 
easily and with few tools. 

Most of us know that a rubber belt 
needs no dressing whatsoever, and should 
be kept free from all oily substances. 
Cleaning should be done with a water- 
moistened rag. The belt should not be 
fitted too tight over the pulleys. The 
proper tension should bring the belt just 
taut enough to insure no slip, but under 
no conditions should a rubber belt be 
applied as tightly as the leather variety. 
I have gotten 3,000 miles out of a rubber 
belt on a high powered twin, used in all 
sorts of weather. 

When fitting the fastener to the belt, 
great care should be used in selecting a 
good one, not one which grips the ex- 
treme end of the belt, but one which 
takes a good long bite on the belt ends. 
When you place the fastener in position 
and screw it down, put the belt on the 




pulleys, and turn the motor over till 
the fastener sets in the rear pulley; then, 
with a large screw driver, send the screws 
further home, and screw them down as 
far as they will go. This will prevent 
the swinging of the fastener, and con- 
sequently the pulling out of the belt. I 
have noticed, while on the road, that 
when a belt had pulled out because of a 
fastener being loose, the rider often cut 
off the end of the belt, inserted the 
fastener again, and went on his way. 
This is exceptionally detrimental to a 
rubber belt, because it is shortened by 
the pull-out, and the rider does not make 
allowance for the piece he has cut off. 
When a belt pulls out, either the back 
wheel should be adjusted to make up 
the difference, or a new piece of belt in- 
serted with an extra fastener. Some- 
times, when the ends of a belt at the 
fastener become frayed, it is a decidedly 
good move to cut the frayed ends off, 
possibly two or three inches at each end, 
and fill up the gap with an extra piece 
of belt and a fastener. This does not 
effect the transmitting power of the belt 
to any extent, and will considerably 
lengthen its life. 

I also notice that on some of the twins 
using iy 8 in. belts, the boys have trouble 
in making the single screw fastener hold. 
I know of a firm which makes a par- 
ticularly good fastener for this size belt. 
It contains four screws instead of two, 
but the fastener can be used only on the 
iy 8 in. belts, and on machines incorporat- 
ing large pulleys. 

When removing the belt for any cause 
whatsoever, particular attention should 
be paid to the direction in which way the 
belt is run. Rubber and canvas belts 
should always be run in the same direc- 
tion, because, by turning them about, 
the strain of the belt is reversed, and the 
canvas is liable to separate from the 
rubber, causing the rubber to crack. 

In order to obtain the best service from 
your belt, use a good belt punch. 
Abandon the idea that a nail and ham- 
mer will make a good enough hole, and 
do not under any circumstances use an 
awl to bore a hole for the belt-fastener 
screw. There are good belt-punches on 



The accompanying photograph is that 
of Charles E. Parker, one of the leading 
motorcycle enthusiasts of Los Angeles, 
Oal., and was taken at Tyrone, Ont.. 
Canada, where he is at present enjoying 
his Excelsior, the roads, the climate and 
other beauties of the community. 

It would appear that Mr. Parker has 
so thoroughly appreciated some of these 
beauties that he has appropriated thorn 
unto himself. Certain it is that when 
he passed through Chicago late in July, 
en route for Canada, he had no such 
pleasant companion, nor did his machine 
show any signs of being built for two. 

Mr. Parker sent this photograph to a 
friend in Chicago, with the statement 
that he was just ready for a sixty-mile 
joy ride to Port Hope and back. He fol- 
lows it with the declaration that the 



the market, especially for rubber belts, 
and I would advise their use. They push 
their way through the canvas, without 
cutting into it, a very important point. 
Furthermore, they are triangular in 
shape, and the hole must be punched 
perpendicularly through the belt and in 
the centre, as the belt fits perfectly into 
the orifice which is made for it. Then 
making a hole with the punch, always 
cut it into the centre of one of the rubber 
blocks, and not so that it comes out into 
one of the grooves on the bottom of the 
belt. This puts more material before 
the fastener screw and pulling out is less 
likely. I have had many occasions to try 
belt rims and pulleys with a special belt 
gauge, and have found quite a number 
of rims out of the true 28 deg. angle. 
Some are smaller in width than the belt, 
some correct two-thirds the way, but 
spread too much at the top, while others 
are too large at the apex of the angle, 
and about right at the edge of the- pulley. 
These conditions cause uneven strain on 
the belts; the bottom part does service, 
the top not, or vice versa, consequently 
the canvas pulls away from the rubber 
and causes cracking. Adjustable pulleys 
are very detrimental to rubber belts, if 
they are not adjusted properly. When 
coming to a hill, if one opens the ad- 
justable pulley so far as to allow the 
rubber belt to run on the bottom of the 
pulley, it will cause the belt to slip, 
inducing considerable friction. On 
the other hand, when setting the pulley 
up tightly, so as to obtain a high gear, 
one should never close it so far as to 
cause the belt to set outside of the pulley 
edge. Undue friction caused by slipping 
on account of a too loose belt, or too 
wide a pulley, will raise "Old Harry" 
with rubber belts, as will also over- 
heated motors. 

For those who are ambitious enough to 
convert their machines to V-belt drive, 
and for those who are making up their 
own machines, the following belt sues 
are required for different horse powers: 
% in. up to 3 h. p.; % in. up to 4 h. p.; 
1 in. up to 6 h. p.; \% in. up to 8-10 
h. p. Don't overload your belt under 
any circumstances. 



"26-inch magneto is the best I ever rode 
and takes two of us anywhere we want 
to go in Canada." 

C. K. Brown, of Parsons, Pa., has re- 
turned from a 600-mile trip through New 
York State. He passed through Syra- 
cuse, Cornell and Elmira and was away 
a week. He made the run without any 
accident of note, not even a puncture. 
He rode an M. M. machine. 

Four of the prizes offered by the San 
Francisco Examiner in its motor contest 
are motorcycles, and the prospect of 
winning one of the two-wheelers has ma- 
terially added to the interest which com- 
petitors are taking in the progress of the 
struggle to land at the top of the list. 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



25 




Tool Stool Brako Bond and Lever 



o|3i 

Now Actuator 



THE NEW 




Bond Brake Showing Top Ploto Holding Porto 
in FooHion < Transparent View.) 



NEW DEPARTURE 

INTERNAL EXPANDING BAND COASTER BRAKE 

For MOTORCYCLES-THOROUGHLY DEPENDABLE 

BECAUSE IT IS: 

POWERFUL— Will stall high powered motors 

POSITIVE — Responds instantly to back pedal 

pressure 

PRACTICAL — Efficiency has been proved by 

severe road tests 



Will not bind or lock. Will not cut into brake drum 

Will not " feed up" or drag pedals when coasting 

Will not fail to operate because of overheating 



THIS IS THE BRAKE YOU OUGHT TO HAVE 

IT IS THE BRAKE YOU WILL HAVE AFTER YOU 
HAVE LEARNED WHAT IT IS. WRITE FOR FOLDER 



The New Departure Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn. 

Coaster Brake Licensors 

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36 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 



Stubbs Wins at Memphis — Other Racing News 



Menpfcit, Tenm.— Bobby Stubbs, of 
Birmingham, Ala., won every event at 
the fair, September 30th, and broke his 
own record for the track, a mile against 
time, going the distance in 0:55%. His 
former record was 58 seconds, made last 
year. The summaries: 

Ten-mile Handicap — Stubbs (Indian) 
first, scratch; Joyce (Indian) second; 
one eighth mile; Griffen (N. S. U.) third, 
one-eighth mile. Time, 0:35. 

Mile open, flying start. Stubbs (In- 
dian), first; Joyce (Indian), second. 
Time, 1:05. 

Mile, flying start, against track record. 
Stubbs, on an Indian, won. Time, 0:55%, 

Two mile, open, flying start. Stubbs 
(Indian), first; Joyce (Indian), second; 
Griffen (N. 8. U.), third. Time, 2:09. 

Stubbs made another clean up Satur- 
day. The summaries: 

Two mile open — Won by Stubbs, In- 
dian; second, Joyce, Indian; third, 
Sweet, Indian. Time, 1:08 4/5, 2:14%. 

One mile against time, flying start — 
By Robert Stubbs, Indian. Time, 
0:56 4/5. 

Five miles handicap — Won by Stubbs, 
Indian (scratch); second, Sweet, Indian 
(% mile) ; third, Joyce, Indian (% mile). 
Time, 6:07 4/5. 

Eight thousand persons witnessed the 
motor races conducted on the State Fair 
Park track at Milwaukee Saturday, Oct. 
2. There were two motorcycle events. 
In the ten-mile race Oakley Fisher, 
though second, made a fine ride on a 4 h. 



Harley-Davidson, making the distance 
in 10:15, good time for a single on a dirt 
track. In the ten -mile race, Harvey Ber- 
nard was going fine when he threw a tire 
off of his 7 h. twin and by clever head 
work prevented an accident. The sum- 
maries : 

Five-mile Handicap — First, Frank Ol- 
lerman, 4 Harley-Davidson. (handicap 
1:40); second, Ray Milbrath, 4 Harley- 
Davidson (handicap 1:40); third, Ralph 
Sporleder, 5 Indian (handicap :45); 
fourth, Oakley Fisher, 7 Harley-Davidson 
(scratch); time, 6:15; scratch man's 
time, 4:49 1-5. 

Ten -mile Handicap — First, G. W. Cook, 
5 Indian (2 m. 20 s.); second, Oakley 
Fisher, 4 Harley-Davidson (1 m.) ; third, 
Ralph Sporleder, 5 Indian (1 m.) ; fourth, 
Frank Ollerman, 4 Harley-Davidson (2 
m. 50 s.) ; time, 11:08; fastest time, Oak- 
ley Fisher, 10:15. 

On the last day of the San Luis Val- 
ley Fair, held in Monte Vista, Colo., 
September 28 to 30, the program in- 
cluded two motorcycle races. The first 
was a five mile for 3 horse machines, 
and was hotly contested by Arthur 
Frownfelter and L. G. Burr, both riding 
R-S machines. Frownfeltcr won by 
only a few lengths. The next race was 
a five mile handicap. C. B. Stutsman 
(4 R-S) was scratch man, and L. G. 
Burr, Arthur Frownfelter and John 
Smith, all riding 3 h. R-S machines, 
had 300 yards. In the second mile, 
Smith broke his chain and dropped out. 
About this time, Stutsman began to 



gain on the 300 yard riders. In the last 

half of the fifth mile he passed the 

leader and won the race by several 
lengths. 

Waukegan, 111. — C. Olson won the ten- 
mile race at the Libertyville mile track 
September 26 in 11:59. A. H. Crocker 
was second and L. Galitski was third. 
In the twenty-five-mile race, Roy Yeo- 
man, of Waukegan, finished first. Emil 
Perkowitz collided with Charles Fergu- 
son on the twenty- fourth lap and was 
badly cut about the legs. J. S. Thorne 
won the free-for-all ten-mile event in 
12:35. W. L. Walsh was second in 13:25, 
Roy Yeoman third, 13:29, and J. Blank- 
enheim fourth. 

The five-mile motorcycle race was one 
of the most interesting events of the day 
at the Fair Park track, Dallas, Saturday, 
September 25. Three machines were en- 
tered, two twin Indians and one single 
Excelsior. The distance was five miles 
and the Excelsior was given a handicap 
of a quarter of a mile. The Excelsior 
was ridden by Lewis Clark, and the two 
Indians by C. Herling and E. J. Morris, 
respectively. Herling won, while Morris, 
on the second Indian, passed the Excel- 
sior just before the wire was reached. 

The Rochester club conducted a series 
of races Oct. 3 on the Latta Road track. 
A. D. Cook won the free-for-all race for 
single cylinder machines, and defeated 
Stauder in the handicap event. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



A Page 

Aurora Automatic Machinery Cc 38 

American Motor Co . a 29 

American Motorcycle Co 40 

American Stepney Spare Wheel Co ... . 23 

B 

Boach Magneto Co Cover IV 

Badger Brass Mfg. Co 28 

Breexe Carbureter Co 39 

c 

Corbin Screw Corporation 30 

E 

Empire Tire Co 40 

Excelsior Supply Co 31 

Eclipse Machine Co 36 

Emblem Mfg. Co 32 

F 

F. A. M 39 

G 

G ft J Tire Co 20, 21 

Grossman Co., Emil 40 

Goodyear Tire ft Rubber Co 31 

Goodrich Co., B. F TCover III 



H Page. 

Harley-Davidson Motor Co 37 

Hendee Manufacturing Co. . . .Front Cover 

Hornecker Motor Mfg. Co 40 

Hansen Mfg. Co., O. C 39 

Herring-Curtiss Co 36 

Hera & Co 35 

J 

Jeffery-Dewitt Co 33 

Jones Speedometer Co 36 

Jenkins, Geo. P 40 

K 

Kokomo Rubber Co Cover ll 

M 

Morgan & Wright 32 

Merkel-Light Motor Co 27 

Mesinger Mfg. Co., H. & F 33 

McLaughlin & Ashley 40 

Motorcycle Equipment Co 39 

Mart, The 28 

N 

New Departure Mfg. Co 25 

N. S. U. Motor Co 37, 40 

New Era Gas Engine Co 39 



p Page. 

Pfanstiehl Electrical Laboratory 28 

Prest-O-Lite 34 

Pittsfield Spark Coil Co 34 

R 

Reading Standard Co 35 

Rose Mfg. Co 38 

Reliance Motor Cycle Co 39 

s 

Splitdorf, C F 33 

Shaw Mfg. Co 39 

Standard Thermometer Co 40 

T 

Tingley & Co., Chas. 40 

Thiem Mfg. Co 40 

Tiger Cycle Works Co 40 

V 

Veeder Mfg. Co 38 

w 

Whipple, I. H 38 

Widmayer Co., F. B 39 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



V 



MERREL - COMFORT 



s 
p 

R 

N M 
G E 



F 
R 
A 




S 
P 
R 
I 

N 
G 



F 
O 
R 
K 

S 



Merkel-Light Motor Co., Pottstown, Pa. 



Chicago. 111., Sept. 11, 1909. 



Gentlemen : The writer, In company with Mr. E. P. Lake, has just completed a trip 
from Chicago to St. Louis and return, on ^Merkel" Motorcycles. Will say, from my own 
observations and experience, that this trip could not be undertaken with anything like 
comfort on any machine but a "Merkel." 

The SPRING FRAME and CUSHION FORK absorbed every particle of road shock, 
and rough roads were like Boulevards to us. The Ball Bearing Motor seemed to have an 
unlimited amount of speed and power, both on bills and in sand. Nothing Is more ex- 
hilarating than to shoot to the top of a long, steep hill with undiminished speed, and 
know that you have a Motor under you that is not going to die half way up. 

I took more pleasure riding on this trip than any trip I have ever gone on. 

Yours respectfully, 

J. E. STARR. 



MERREL -SPEED 



Los Angeles 

Coliseum 

Board 

Track 

September 13th 

1 Mile, 44 Sec. 



Ascot Mile 

Dirt Track 


'^Ls 


Lot Angeles 

California 

September 9th 

10 Miles, 9.172 




5 Miles, 4.35 
1 Mile, .52 1 


^^F^^\^ 



THATS THE KIND OF MACHINE YOU WANT, MR. RIDER 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 

MERKEL-LIGHT MOTOR CO., Pottstown, Pa. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



Qcwbebl 15, 1909. 




MOTORCYCLE MART— IT SELLS THE STUFF 
Buy; Sell; Exchange, Two Cents a Word. Cash With Copy 



| fQ* »ALI OR EXCHANGE | 

¥(M §AL%=^UfX? fmt&rcy<tk* doe single cylinder and 
ene twfe syffodter, t**fr fttKad wfcto Urn engyne and two-#peed 
dwfes A tore***; l*/ffr In Hr#t da** emdhien; practically 
nm t<w* to Erf* P lalajfciffi < Boa ''.•/.. BiadMs K. 

TWHriy-FIVE DOLLARS JOWARD--FOR THOR 
mtQUCYOM STOLEN SEPTEMBER 16, AT WICH- 
ITA, KAMfAS, MOTOR MO, &»& FRAME NO. 1063, 
FRENCH GREY, s3lR STRAIGHT TOP 
__, MOTIFY HOCKADAY MOTORCYCXE COM- 
VjeHlTA, KANSAS, 

■ 

> ,< »r I// 

WA'. UN rvrl 



If ar ley-DaWdaon motorcycle ; 
Goodrich white face, ribbed 
|ftjn\ C B U care of Motoh- 



ii -"power Twin, J, Eblcn, Chatta- 



FOR ^ALE/— Nai 

KG] 

M II Mm ••• I. I'JH 

< nliii 

MM' '.All :ir V 

I " 1 rat 

1 iiq§g City, M., 



/^ twin Indian 5 h.p, ; loop frame; 
1 riiiy; [»tifr $175. A, G. Lucking, 



I ! -pri i;»l in A i ' onditinn, bought 

(] Mfi V l.rli, ( i.lninlii.i -.. .n« Illicit and 

.1 ■ iir, I i.,, ■ , i.,i.. tin . bargain. 

< <»i VV.iNh '. I'i..mI..ii, So. Norwalk, 



hit) M M rwin, Magneto, just re- 
(1; ifckncsn; only $245. James Clcnny, 



Ride All Night 
If You Need To ! 




Hut nrr to it tbnt your machine 
)■ hitril with the new SOLAR 

hioloivvilr Ump ami urnn.itoi. 
1 luti u tlvr one outfit thnt will 
omkr voui night 1 uluuj *.ilr. 
Auk any luln who h.i5 one what 
hr ltum» ;ihoul thr Solar. It's 
Jollar» to crnU hr can't hr in- 
tlucril to u»r amthiun rUr, l>o 
you trrl thr »*mc WAV about 
your |uc»cut (siuipmrnl ? 



THE BADGER BRASS 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

TWO MCfOIIICS; 

ktNOSHA. WISCONSIN 
437 ELEVENTH AVE,, NEW YORK 



FORE CAR, with \L & M. motorcycle; like new; cost 
fjoo: will sell for $175; your chance. E» J. Ballon, P. O. 
Station T^ Brooklyn, X. y. 

FOR SALE — Excelsior 4-b.p. motorcycle with extra tire, 
stand, luggage carrier, lamp and horn; good as new; a bar- 
gain at $150. Address 1626 22A street, Two Hirers, Wis. 

FOR SALE— 1900 M. M. 3H h.p. Magneto Special, ran less 
than 100 miles; perfect condition, must sell at once; no rea- 
sonable offer refused. G. M. Greene, 2127 Michigan avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

I AGENTS CARDS, ETC. 

iTORCYCLE TONXEAU— DUCK'S PATENT. CUSH- 
ION-SPRING, TANDEM ATTACHMENT, CARRIES EX- 
TRA RIDER WITHOUT JOLT OR JAR. SEND FOR 
CIRCULAR. A. W. DUCK, OAKLAND, CAL MENTION 
"MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED." 

FOR SALE — A number of shop- worn and second-hand 
motorcycles, including Excelsiors, Indians, New Eras and 
Reliance. Send for full descriptions and make offer. 
Kellington & Dieckhoff, Decatur, 111. 

FOR SALE— 1009 3^-h.p. M-M, Bosch Magneto, and ex- 
tras, cost $247, used only 200 miles by experienced rider ; 
$175. Architects & Engineers' Supply Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

MOTORCYCLES thoroughly overhauled and repaired ; 
Bgentl for Thor and Excelsior motorcycles; supplies and 
sundries. Brazenor & Ruderman, 849 Bedford Avenue, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

M-M and R-S MOTORCYCLES— East End Cycle Co., 

Hk'lil.'iml K P.ritlrr, near Centre avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

FOR SALE— New 5-h.p. twin Indian, $200; second-hand 
5-h.p. twins, $125 up; singles, $75 up. F. B. Widmayer 
Compa ny, 23T2 Broadway, New York City. 

SKCOND HAND M. M. BARGAINS-Exhaust Whistles, 
Hand Idlers. M. M, Branch, 8 95 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

DISCOVERED— The motorcyclists' best friend on a windy 
night. A positive stormproof lamp lighter, once used, never 
without: finest thing in the world for smokers; only 25 cents. 
Tiger Cycle Works Co., 782 Eighth avenue, New York City. 

B. & C. Two-Speed and Free Engine Gears; Ideal equip- 
ment for Motorcycles. Bushnell & Cannon, 1268 E. 80th 
place, Geveland, Ohio. 

WE WILL store motorcycles for the winter for $5 per 
machine. Repairs made and parts furnished at reasonable 
rates, Stamford Motor Cycle Co., Stamford, Conn. 

RALEIGH, N. C— The sheriff's office has received a 
letter which instructs the officers of this county and 
all other counties in North Carolina that a motorcycle 
I under the same provision, as to licenses, as auto- 
mobiles. Therefore each motorcyclist will be required to 
carry a license tag as an automobile and pay the same 
fees The tag must be conspicuously shown and visible 
at all times. The license fee is nve dollars. 



PfANSTIfHL (OILS 



FOR MOTORCYCLES 
Ar*Gi 



■raafee4 Xbaolately 
tar 5 Year* 

Oar aatratad a?et*ai of Pa>c*kr vtadtaz i iphtaa this, sad alia 
ta* WMwferfel taU N a gy of aU Ptaastltftl Catav Tana raaaaaa far aar 

Indestructibility Reliability Price 

PFANSTIEHL ELECTRICAL LABORATORY, totl Okaf* l 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



29 



Talk No. 2 



To The "Live" Agents in 
Unoccupied M.M. Territory 



In our last advertisement in this paper we talked 
about our 1910 plans. That talk was convincing. 
It was fact, every word of it. And we have been 
busy ever since answering questions. It seems a 
difficult matter for many persons to believe that we 
— or any other motorcycle manufacturer — can af- 
ford to spend from $35,000 to $50,000 in an ad- 
vertising campaign for 1910. We shall be specific. 
But first just a few words about the new M. M. 

It is one corking good machine. There is not a 
thing on the market that can touch it with a ten- 
foot pole. We've had it out on the road — and we 
know. Every new feature has been thoroughly 
tested out, and the old ones have been improved. 
What is more, in one month from today we shall be- 
gin to make deliveries. 

If the machine was not good enough to have our 
wholehearted backing we would hesitate a long time 
before announcing an advertising and selling cam- 
paign of the magnitude we contemplate. But the 
machine is here. We have the utmost confidence in 
it. We know it will make good, and we'll back it 
to the limit. 

Past experience has fixed the fact that we can 
spend $10 for advertising on each motorcycle we 
manufacture. We have ordered castings, forgings, 
etc., enough to build 3,000 machines of one model 
and 500 of another. These 3,500 machines will give 
us our minimum of $35,000 for advertising purposes. 



We fully expect the demand for M.M.'s will exceed 
this number by many hundred. We hope it may by 
another thousand. Every additional motor made 
gives us another $10 to spend. 

This minimum of $35,000 will be spent all over 
the country. The trade papers will get some of it. 
Magazines devoted to outdoor life, such as "Field 
and Stream," "Recreation," "Outing," "Country 
Life" and others will all carry M. M. advertising. 
The general magazines, both monthly and weekly, 
"Saturday Evening Post," "Collier's," "Every- 
body's," "Munsey's," etc., will also carry consider- 
able of it. During show seasons and other special 
times the daily papers will get their share. 

All of this is bound to sell M. M. Motorcycles. 
The factory is there with the goods — the machine 
that will make them all sit up and take notice. And 
a good machine, backed with a liberal advertising 
campaign, can't be anything but a successful seller. 
Our advertising is going to help us sell our output, 
but it is going to help our agents as much as it will 
us. As an M. M. agent you will get the direct re- 
turns from every dollar we spend. 

Our proposition is good. Good enough so we can 
select out agents. We want live men — hustlers who 
can make money for themselves, and us. There is 
territory aplenty. Some of it where the riding sea- 
son lasts all the year round. Get it now. Make up 
your mind at once, and write us immediately. 



AMERICAN MOTOR CO., 716 Centre St., Brockton, Mass. 

DISTRIBUTING STORES: 
American Motor Company, 818 Clarendon St., Boston, Man.; Geo. P. Jenkini, 10 W. 60th St., New York Oity; L. E. Frenoh, 898 
Main St, Buffalo, V. Y.; O. M. Greene, Mgr. Am. Motor Go., 1586 Michigan Ave., Chicago, HI.; American Motor Go. of Texai, M. M. 
Building, Dallas, Tex.; Lincoln Holland, 1084 8o. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 



e 



NOT AN EXPERIMENT 
BUT A PROVEN SUCCESS 

THE 




CORBIN 

BAND BRAKE 

For Belt or Chain Drive Motorcycles is 
Superior to All Others in 

Principle, Strength and Reliability 

C-O-R-B-I-N SPELLS BOTH 
QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP 



AGFNTS AND RIDERS— Handle and Use a Brake Whose Success Has Been Demonstrated 
^ ^^^^^^^^=^^= °y Thousands. Quotations on Request. 

The CORBIN SCREW 
CORPORATION 

Licensed Coaster Brake Manufacturer* 

NEW BRITAIN, C0NN. 9 U. S. A. 

THE CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION 

OF CHICAGO 

107-109 Lake Street Chicago, III. 

WAREHOUSES— 106, 108, 110 Lafayette St., 
New York; Northwest Corner Eighth and 
Arch Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 




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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



3* 



A RECORD OF STEADY SERVICE 

If you have read the reports of road and reliability runs, you must have noted the prominence 
of the EXCELSIOR AUTO-CYCLE. It has taken part in every big road test of the year and 

has held a promi- 
nent position in the 
perfect score list 
every time. 
This tells the Story of 

EXCELSIOR 

QUALITY 

The Quality that Makes 
Good Every Time. 

We are already re- 
ceiving many applica- 
tions for 1 9 1 territory. 

Better Get Busy. 

EXCELSIOR SUPPLY COMPANY 




Established 
18 7 6 



233-3 7 Randolph St. 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



Has Ridden Over 4,000 Miles on 
These Tires — Tread Not Worn 



See What a Perfect Tire This Is 

A. L. Olds of Toledo, Ohio, writes this about his 

experience with Goodyear Tires : 

"About two years ago I got a pair of your 2# x 28 inch 
Motorcycle Tires for my demonstrating Wagner tandem, 
and I am pleased to say that these are still on the machine 
after covering 4,000 miles over all kinds of roads, with two 
persons the greater part of the time, and often a total 
weight of over 550 pounds. 

"These tires are now in better shape than many which 
I have seen which have not been in use two weeks, and 
covered not to exceed 400 miles, with a single rider. 

"The corrugations are not quite worn out of the middle 
of the tread, and there is not a cut, scratch or bruise in 
the casings, although I have run over newly crushed stone 

roads for miles, and have en- 
countered all the usual objects 
in the city streets, such as 
iroken glass, tin and cinders, 
l>ut fortunately I have had no 
unctures." 



The Toughest, Yet the Easiest Riding 

The Goodyear Is really the lowest priced tire. It will outwear several 
pairs of ordinary tires, because the cover stock is made of toughened 
rubber, built for the extreme of wear, yet still retaining its resiliency. 
This is strengthened by the casing — moulded type — which has four 
plies of the most durable, most closely woven fabric known. This 
is the famous Sea Island fabric, which costs 55c a yard. We could 
use common muslin at sJ£c. a yard. But it requires 300 pounds to 
break this fabric, while common muslin breaks at 40 to 60 pounds. 
Hence it wouldn't do for 

Moulded Clincher 
Motorcycle Tires 




(jOODjrtEAR 

The construction of this Sea Island fabric is such that if a Goodyear 
Tire is cut or jagged by sharp stones or other obstacles it can be 
repaired easily. The fabric being so closely woven it does not separate. 
And Goodyear Motorcycle Tires can be permanently repaired. 

The tube is of the same stock we use in our famous Ked Seal Auto- 
mobile Tubes. Butt end or endless type. 

The only rubber used in Goodyear Tires is the finest of new Para. 
We could use cheaper grades that would cost but a fourth of what we 
pay. We could even use "reclaimed" rubber from the junk pile, that 
we could get for next to nothing. With all their strength and dura* 
bility Goodyear Clincher Motorcycle Tires are the most resilient, easiest 
riding. We can furnish them in either single or double clinch. Write 
for sample section. Get our special agency proposition. 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE 6 RUBBER COMPANY, Moal Street, Akron, Ohio 



Branches: 



Atlanta, 90 North Pryor St.; Boston, 669 Boylston St.; Chicago, 82-84 Michigan Ave.; Buffalo. 719 
Main St.; Cincinnati, 317 E. Fifth St.; Cleveland, 2006 Euclid Ave.; Denver, 28 W. Colfax Ave.; 
Detroit, 251 Jefferson Are.; Los Angeles, 949-51 S. Main St.; New York City, 64th St. and Broadway; Philadelphia, 
Broad and Falrmoant Ares.; Pittsburg. 5988 Center Are.; San Francisco, 506 Golden Gate Ave.; St. Louis, 8935-37 
Olive St.; Washington, 1026 Connecticut Ave. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 



Bother with Cracked Treads and Separated Fabric Plies is Unnecessary 

Morgan & Wright Motorcycle Tires 

are Positively Proof Against Such Trouble 

Our tires are made out of the most tenacious, resilient rubber known — the pure Para 
gum, which comes directly from the Amazon region. Such rubber, after being subjected to 
our special wrapped-shaped method of construction (not the ordinary moulded method now 
in common use), has no tendency to crack or separate, even under the severest usage. 

This explains why such reports as the 
following are of such frequent occurrence: 

San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 19. — Balke established new Tanforan track record for 1 mile — time 54^, 
and broke all of the track records from 1 to 5 miles in the five-mile, free-for-all. He rode Morgan & 
Wright tires. 

Milwaukee, Sept, 27. — Morgan & Wright tires won 6 out of 7 events at the Motorcycle Race meet. 

Fort Collins, Colo.,, Sept. 29. — Morgan & Wright tires won all 7 events on the race meet program. 

All the fastest riders swear by them. 

MORGAN <& WRIGHT, - 



Detroit 









29 DAYS A MOTORCYCLIST 

EMBLEM RIDER MAKES GOOD IN 

F. A. M. National Endurance Run 

Mr. Heil secured a Per- 
fect Score on a machine 
that had been finished only 
the Sunday before, and had 
not been tried out before. 
There's dependability for 
you. 

The performance of the 
EMBLEM in this run 
proved conclusively that 
this machine has the 
strength to get there with 
the best of them. One of 
our Trade Riders had a 
Perfect Score, and the 
other lost only 15 points, 
because of his having to 
ride on a flat tire for sev- 
eral miles. 




Write for our catalogue and our Agency proposition 



EMBLEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 



3k H. P. $175.00 
4 H.P. $200.00 

ANGOLA, N. Y. 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



33 



H.&F. MESINGER MFG. CO. 

Announ cement fo r 1910 

To the Trade and the Rider: 

The success which we have had during 
the past year has greatly exceeded our 
expectations. There has been a truly re- 
markable and constantly increasing de- 
mand for the exclusive features found in 
Mesinger Saddles, with their Patent 
Spring System and Fibre Friction Shock 
Absorbers. 

Nothing can test the comfort-giving qualities more thoroughly than your experiences while 
touring. Nothing can add more to your enjoyment of riding than the presence of the qualities 
found exclusively in Mesinger Motorcycle Saddles. 

THOUSANDS OF RIDERS Have found in the Mesinger Saddle their exact Requirements, 
namely, CORRECT SHAPE, and the ABSENCE OF SIDESWAY, REBOUNDS AND VIBRATION. 

These have been secured under the most adverse conditions by the users of the Mesinger 
Cavalry No. 3, and the larger models for heavier riders. 

We are ready to furnish our complete line for 1910, with a number of 
important changes guaranteed to add to the durability of our product. 

THE H. & F. MESINGER MFG. CO., jwj-jmj rasi ave., NEW YORK 




TWO REASONS 

WHY you should use 
SPARK PLUGS 

"Spark In Water," which means they 
will spark In the cylinder under any and all 
conditions, for water Is the wont of all 
short-circuiting matter. A drop of water will 
short-circuit other plugs, which proves they 
are inferior. Reliance Is the one plug that 
is recognised as mechanically correct. 

The "Sparkling Point" is a halr-llke 
platinum wire, baked Into the porcelain in- 
sulator, and being so small that the spark 
is concentrated and intensified to such a de- 
gree that the heat and scouring action of 
the spark removes all fouling matter around 
that point. Soot accumulates on other plugs 
and necessitates cleaning. Cleaning entirely 
unnecessary with the Reliance Plug. 

JEFFERY-DEWITT CO. 

Spark Plug Manufacturers 
230 HIGH STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

S. & F. Stephenson. Agents for United Kingdom, 10 Canning 

Place, Liverpool, Eng. 
Armand Prey & Co., Agents for Continental Europe, Berlin, 

Germany. 




THE GREAT SUCCESS 



of the 



SPLITDORF 
Motorcycle Plug 

is due to its giving Unqualified Satisfaction 

It give* unqualified satisfaction became it it made especially 
for Motorcycle work and the moat expert rider» say there is no 
other Plus that give, such good results, 



WILL OUTLAST VOUB MOTOR 




Don't be caught 
empty - handed, Mr. 
Dealer. 

Be ready to sell a 

SPLITDORF 
Plug 



when it is asked for 
mmqmntm by having a stock of 
these famous Plugs on 
% hand. 

\ — = 



C F. SPLITDORF 



Walton Ave. and 138th St. M AW Yorlc 

Branch, 1679 Broadway ilCW * Urtk 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October IS, 1909. 



Night's Curtain Draws As 
When Touched 



i Prest-0 -Lite 



~ 



? > 



A GOOD, dependable lighting system is worth more than 
all the accident insurance you could buy. 

Feeble oil lamps and treacherous gas generators invite 
accident, danger and expense, and are a nuisance to operate. 

Most experienced automobilists have discarded all other 
equipment and adopted Prest-O-Lite. Motorcyclists are doing 
likewise. 

With Prest-OLite there is no uncertainty, no tinkering, 
no dirty work. The flame is always steady — doesn't flare up 
nor die down. Turned on and off* like a gas jet 

In automobile service, Prest-OLite has proven that it costs 
little if anything more than portable generating systems. 



M 



& 



The Prest-OLite Motorcycle Gas Tank is \z in. long and 
4 in. diameter. Weighs 7 pounds. Holds 10 ft of gas— 40 
hours of light 



FULL TANK 60c. 

(In Exchange for Empty) 



PRICE $10 

Thirty-day trial plan. See your dealer, or write us. 

The Prest-O-Lite Co., i^ian'*pou..ind! 

Branches at New York, Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco 
and Cleveland. 3,000 Exchange Agents 




mBBDB 'w 



SPARK COILS, SPARK PLUGS, SWITCHES, TIMERS 

AND DISTRIBUTERS AND MAGNETOS 



MADE IN AMERICA 



HAVE NO SUPERIOR IN THE MARKET 




Magneto Spark Plug 



J|#n#*i«4%«t4%f« A #» • You cannot afford to uae inferior good* 
mOZOrCyCll8l8 . ..therefore get Pit f field Ignition- 

No matter what make motorcycle you use. It is the 
spark that does the business, therefore use Pittsneld Ig- 
nition. Remember that our coils are the most efficient, 
giving you the hottest, (attest spark possible and shoots it 
where it will give the best results every time. We have 
coils for any number of cylinders required — we make 
either flat or torpedo heads. The Pittsfield Spark 
Plug is the Best Made. The mica insulation will 
not crack, it being so perfectly made that the mica is virtually solid electrodes; are so prepared that 
they afford the greatest resistance to the high tension current. No matter whether it is for motorcycles, 
cars, boats or aeroplanes — insist on having the best, which is the Pittsneld System. 
Write for Particular*, Catalogue*, Price Littt, Etc, 



















' i 









PITTSFIELD SPARK COIL CO.,»Dalton, Mao. 

Sales Representatires : New England, W. J. Connell, 36 Columbus Avenue, Boston. Atlantic States, Thomas J.Wetzel. 17 West 
42nd Street, New York. Central States, K. Franklin Peterson, H. V. Greenwood, 166 Lake Street, Chicago. Michigan, 
L. D. Bolton, 319 Hammond Building, Detroit. Pacific Coast, The Laugenour Co., San Francisco. 

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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



35 




R-S 

EVIDENCE 
R-S WINS 




At CHICAGO, ILL, Labor Day Races. 

First in 5 mile race. 
First in 1 mile race. 



At ROME, GA., Labor Day Races. 

First in 5 mile race for Single Cylinder 
" "10" " free for all. 



At SPRINGFIELD, MASS., Labor Day 
Races. 

"R-S" wins second against a "Special" 
of prominent make with auxiliary ports. 



At WILDWOOD, N. J., Labor Day 
Races. 

First in Event No. 1-30 1-2 cu. in. 
First and Second in Event No. 2—48 1 -2 

cu. in. 
Second in Event No. 3—61 cu. in. 
In time trial R. SEYMOUR makes mile 

in 45 2-5 seconds. 



At WICHITA, KAN., Labor Day Races. 

First in 2 mile race for single cylinders. 



At ROCHESTER, N. Y., Labor Day 
Races. 

First in 3 mile novice race. 



At TROY, N. Y., August 28th. 

First in 5 mile race. 



Agents Wanted Everywhere. Write for Art Catalogue 

Reading Standard Co. 



Bingaman and Water Sts. 



Reading, Pa., U.S.A. 



The Standard of 
2 Hemispheres 



Herz"* 



H 



Tension 



Magneto 



Is the Smallest, Lightest and Most 
Efficient Magneto Ever Made. 

The most perfect type of ignition obtainable. No starting 
device, timer, or coil required. 

Generates a very hot spark and real arc flame. 

A marvel of fine workmanship. All parts interchangeable. 




Read 

This Letter: 

"No doubt you will be pkascd to learn that one of the 
machines driven by the winning Yale Team in the Chicago 
Motorcycle Club Endurance Kun, July 9-10-11, was equipped 
with the Herz-Magneto. The battery box, magneto, carbure- 
tor, spark plugs and vibrator were sealed. The run was 600 
miles and was made without a single adjustment, making 
a perfect team score, every seal being intact. This estab- 
lishes a new record. 

"THE CONSOLIDATED MANUFACTURING CO., 

"A. B. COFFMAN, Sales Mgr." 



IT NEVER FAILS! 
IT NEVER FOULS! 

WE 6UMNTEE IT FILLY 

hr ait Ynr 

HERZ-PLUG 

"BOUGIE NURCEDCS" 

Is proof against oil or 
soot; self-cleaning. Forms 
part of your motor, same 
as the pistons. Needs 
never to be taken out. 
Prioa, Standard, Motir- 
oyoU «r Magneto Ty >•» 

$| CO Postpaid 
|i9U Ev rywhare 

ASBESTOS COPPER GASKETS 
Larr«at Stock In Aaicrloa. MO •!*«• 



HERZ & CO., En ^l' ePS 

Corner Lafayette and Houston Streets 
PARIS NEW YORK VIENNA 

FREE— Oir New Ignition Booklet is free. Write for it. 




J 



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36 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 1909. 



1A1M1?0 madc the firit 

III N M ^ motorcycle speed- 
Uvll MJ%3 ometer, years ago. 
He improved on 
the original Each succeeding year 
brought out something a little better 
than the previous one. You proba- 
bly remember the old friction drive 
and some of the other earlier models. 
Compare the new Jones Model 32 that 
is illustrated herewith with any other 
speedometer on the market to-day. 
You will find it is just as far ahead of 
the field as it is ahead of the early 
models that Jones made. It takes ex- 
perience to build speedometers. See 
that you get the 

JONES SPEEDOMETER 



MAXIMUM 
SPEED HAND 



SEASON ODOMETER- 
TRIP ODOMETER 



10NES SPEDOMETER DEP7, 
UNITED MANUFACTURE Inc 

Broadway and 76th St 
NEW YORK 




INSTANTANEOUS RESET 



Model 32, 60 Mile Scale, Maximum Hand 

Price $25 



A FEW WORDS OF APPRECIATION 

From a Contented Rider and Agent Who Made a Perfect Score 
in the F. A. I\. National Endurance Run 



This is a 

Sample of 

Hundreds 

of Letters 

we receive 

from our 

Patrons 



Rochester, N. Y., Aug. 14, 1909. 
Eclipse Machine Co., 

Elmira, N. Y. 
Dear Sirs: 

It is a great pleasure to go into an Endurance Contest and 
never have to worry about your coaster brake. I have sold 
about fifty of your brakes this summer, and I am glad to say 
that I have never had one complaint against them or any 
trouble in any way. I think they are the only perfect brakes 
for motorcycles. 

Yours truly, 

A. D. COOK. 



They Tell a 

Story of 

Reliability 

They 

Prove 

Our Brake 

is Right 



Eclipse Coaster Brake Users Always Get Perfect Satisfaction 
We are Licensed Coaster Brake Manufacturers 



ECLIPSE MACHINE CO., 



ELMIRA, N.Y. 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



37 




Strictly stock motorcycles 
win every event started in. 



Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 25th. 
Fort Collins, Colo., Sept. 29th. 
Norton, Kansas, Sept. 30th. 
Milwaukee, Wis., Oct. 2d. 



FIRST 

IN 
EVERY 
EVENT. 



The HARLEY-DAV1S0N has a winning way. 

HARLEY- DAVIDSON MOTOR CO. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Agai He Chns fer tie RflUBIUlY if the CURTKS are Prtvei. 
POSTALTELEBRAPH^^ COMMERCIAL CABLES 

tuMMI M. mtw, N uiiii 

TELEGRAM 



BrAOklyo^I.Y. , Soptaabw-U.-iaoe — 
Barrio* .CarU** Co*-* 



ram » d—hl> jwf— ■afrayel— y— n»«~i TTP ^nrtrrt flftj ■!!■ 
—aft Mad— Kofr e»al« Club mtirti 




Aiy mi cm see the 
reasMsWHY. 



THE CLAIMS— THE PROOF— THE REASONS 

From the begin- 
ning we have stead- 
fastly claimed that 
the CURTISS MO- 
TORCYCLE is 
die most reliable 
in the world We 
have attained posi- 
tive perfection in 
motorcycle con- 
struction, which 
ideal condition is 
being consistently 
demonstrated day 
by day. 
Sim wn4 IwiHhi tffl nm\. MttnitMCii 

THE HERRING -CURTISS GO. 

HAMmomoapom, m. r. 



Correct Design. 

Refer Bcerns Eisaes. 

ONLY the very best 

•f weriuuisiipaM* 

material. 

ItfltlMfcriptf mum- 



WHEN YOU BUY A 
MOTORCYCLE 

BE UP-TO-DATE 



IN OTHER WORDS BUY 




The N. S. U. has originated many of the now 
standard motorcycle ideas and is in a position to-day 
to offer you a most up-to-date and perfect motorcycle, 
not a mass of stolen ideas, but an original creation 
based upon true and tried principles. For instance the 

N. S. U. TWO-SPEED GEAR 



has for years been leading the world; fancies and 
enthusiasm have attempted to drown the popularity or 
the necessity of a two-speed motorcycle, but we have 
persisted that the N. S. U. would revolutionize the 
motorcycle game, and it has. One of the oldest motor- 
cycle papers years ago spoke as follows of an N. S. U. 
two-speed gear: 

"If the Endurance Contest of the F. A. M. demonstrated any- 
thing it demonstrated the value of two-speed gears. Only one 
such transmission was used during the trials, to be sure, but 
its performance was a noticeable and eye-opening one. It took 
its machine up the hills at a slow pace, yet one that carried it 
to their tops. When the rider dismounted in the sand he simply 
restarted his engine while at a standstill, remounted and went on 
without difficulty. Similarly he was able to negotiate all other 
treacherous spot 9 with ease and without worry. It was a 
revelation." 

WHY NOT BE UP-TO-DATE ? 
RIDE AN 



IN. 



U. 



Equipped 
with ea 



TWO-SPEED GEAR 

Writm for Catatognm "M" 

N. S. U. MOTOR CO. 

206 W. 76th STREET NEW YORK CITY 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October 15, 19Q9. 




MOTORCYCLE OIL LAMP 

Showing a Red Rear Light 

A combination of headlight and tail light 

in one lamp. 
The Never out burnt kerosene oil 16 hours 
with one filling and will stay lighted under 
any and all conditions. 

All riveted — will not rattle apart over 
the roughest roads. 

Sold on ten days* trial. Price $3.00 
complete. 

The Neverout is 
equipped with a 
patent glass- cov- 
e r e d reflector, 
made of pure Ger- 
man silver; in- 
stantly removable; 
never loses its 
original brilliancy. 
Guaranteed to stay 
lighted or money 
refunded. 

Made in gun 
metal, brass and 
nickel finish. 

The only perfect 
and reliable motor- 
cycle lamp made. 

If your dealer 
cannot supply you, 
write us direct. 

Dealers: Write 
at once for our 
proposition. 

ROSE MANUFACTURING CO. 




The Neverout Motorcycle Lamp, with 
combination tail light, showing rear view. 
(Patented.) 



933 Arch Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Motorcycle 

Trip 
Cyclometer 

Made heavy and dura- 
ble for the hard usage 
it receives on the Mo- 
torcycle. 

Adjustable Bracket 
fitg all makes of ma- 
chines, 

Large and strong 
striker made for 24 in., 
26 in. and 28 in. wheels. 

The Veeder Mffif. Co. 

42 *artfeant *t„ Hartford, Conn. 

M«h*+9 <>4 Cyclom*Urt,Odom9Ur», Counters, Tacho- 
r**Uif*, Tachodomifr* and DU Carting*. 




Price ~ 

tMplete 
witk Bracket 
«Hf Striker 



NEW EDITION— JUST OUT 
" GONSTRUGnOR. IMUGEIEIT AID CARE OF WTORCTOES" 

Rewiaed and Enlarged— 60 Pago*. 25 Caste 

Contents.— The Motor, Mechanieal Valve*, Working 
of Valves, General Motor Parts, Twin Cylinder Motors, 
Motor Tips, Removing and Replacing Cylinder, Over- 
heating, Piston Rings, Knocking and Founding, Timing, 
Weak Springs, Life of Motors, Care of Valves, Lubri- 
cation, Ignition, Ignition Troubles, Trouble Chart, Mag- 
netos, Carburetor, Transmission, Spring Forks, Tires, 
Two Speed, Attachable Outfits, Bek Donta, Other 
Dont's, Cause of Breakdowns, Points to Remember. 

MOTOtKYOf MJBUSMIK (ft; 299 BMiWlMfeW TDK 




The Motorcycle Industry 
was Founded on 



L 



and Workmanship 

They gave the world the- fi*s+ 
successful and trustworthy 
Motorcycle and they still are 
producing the most reliable-one 

Get Busy Now for 1910 
You must write for our price* 



Aurora Automatic Machinery Co. 

THOR BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 



df" 



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The belt in the world is none too good for oar 
Motorcycle* and accessories at lowest prices. Fierce 4 cylinder, 
$350; Indians, nine models, $175 to $3*5* Good second' ttmfld; 
all kinds, down to $40. Sand for our sundry ctia1us> 



WHIPPLE 



THE MOTOMXULmAfXa 



2*0 W. 



CHICAGO 



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October 15, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



39 



N£ W ERA AUTO-CYCLE 

*mo fcnii, ifee 4*«tor, Head Cwmmkmd Motor 




The New Era Gas Engine Company 

3* DAl£ AYE.. DAYTON. OHIO 



Only A Few Days More 

and than vut aboil We aootethiag very 
to announce regarding the 



Refiaaeel910 Models 

It will he worth your while to wait until 
you know what the New Reliance 
machine will be like. 

ftfJiancp Motorcycle Company 

OWECO, N. Y. 



REMOVAL- 



BARGAIN SALE 

We more to oar now »— *Hflai early next month. 
AU our Mow tod JBecond-fcaad Motorcycles will be 
•old below coat to close them out. If you are In 
tiifi TOf rfcf-^ Xor a real harj tal n that 

WILL SAVE YOU MANY $ $ $ 

write to-day lor our Bargain Circular of the Motor - 
oyaies we are alvtoat giving away. 

MflUCHlf EBWIDT CO., IWHOtlDSKKT, N. Y. 



MAIL THIS TO-DAY 

FRED. WILLIS. 

F.AM.. 
bd. 

Dear Sir: I feci that I ouofat to be a member of the 
F. A. M. We mtMt have a national organization to 
promote motorcycling and to guard and care for its 
many interoris. Please send me particulars. 

(Si8«ed)__ 

State ___ 

Cky 

Street . 



TRY WIDMAYER 

When you are in need of anything pertaining to 
Motorcycluig, either for yourself or machine. 

Prompt Service Prices Right 

Particular attention paid to mail orders. Our Acces- 
sory Catalogue is a reference book among Motorcyclists. 
When you want your machine tuned up for racing or 
overhauled, bring it to us. We produce RESULTS. 

AflftOta far Indian »m1 Harley-Davidaon 

FRANK B. WIDMAYER COMPANY 

2312 Broadway, New York City 
TcHirtmtm' J¥lmc-Hln+m Stored Free 




HANSEN'S 

AUTO and DRIVING 

\ GLOVES 



Perfect 
fitting, 

wonderfully soft and pliable 
and wear like iron. 
Write today for hand- 
some descriptive price- 
list and circular. 

0. C. HANSEN MFG. CO. 

337 East Water Street 
MILWAUKEE 



LET THE MOTOR DO THE WORK 

A MOTORCYCLE can be made quickly FROM ANT BICYCLE by 
using our 2 H. P. Motor Outfit. Unequalled for POWER, SPEED 
and RELIABILITY. Anyone can easily attach our Outfit by follow- 
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The Baby "Breeze" 

CARBURETER 



For Motorcycles, made of 
polished aluminum, small parts 
of brass, weighs fourteen 
ounces; small in size, big in re- 
sults; price ten dollars. Dur- 
able, light and strong — a hand- 
ful only — special connections for 
popular machines included in 
price; 8o to 95 miles per gallon 
under normal road conditions. 
Write for special literature. 
Send ten cents for our Engine 
Trouble Text-book. 



One-hall Aclual Size 



Breeze Carbureter Company 

266 Halsey St. Newark. N. J. 



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40 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



October IS, 1909. 




THE QUALITY OF THE 

(Registered V. S. Pat. Off.) 

SPARK PLUG 

is not made to fit the price but to conform to the 

highest standards of ignition service. Try one to 

please mj— you will buy more to please yourself. 

All sizes, all styles. Porcelain or mica, $1.00 

Write for Catalog "M. Z" 

EMIL GROSSMAN COMPANY, 

232 W. 58th St., New York 

BRANCHES 



Detroit, 874 Woodward Ave. 
poratio 
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Chicago, 1436 Michigan Ave. 
Pacific Coast, Pacific Sales Corporation, 50 v *n Ness Ave.. 



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Branches and Agencies Everywhere 




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S. G. Belts have been longer on 
the market, have given more and 
better satisfaction than any trans- 
mission known. 

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No noisy rattle to contend with, 
no messy or grimy methods for 
proper adjustments, no intricate 
parts which need expert attention. 
That's S. G. Transmission. 

SRSb s. g. belt 

All First Class Manufacturers 
equip them, all Dealers sell them. 

Writ* for our Specialty Booklet 

N. S. U. MOTOR COMPANY 



206 West 76th St 



New York City 




STANDARD SPEEDOMETLH 
Price $15.00 



-THIEM 190S 



If you or your friends or your friends friends are in- 
terested in the latest and beat improved Motorcycles, 
regardless of how highly you regard other makes— do 
not purchase a Motorcycle until you have written us 
for Our Latest Catalogue describing in detail, all 
about Our New and Original Models. Best Agent 
Proportion to Date. 

THIEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
Box 496. Minneapolis Minn. 



The British Motor Cycle 

NEWSPAPE* 

Amerian subscription rate f8.S0 per annum 
"Th« Motor Cycjgj" 20 Tudor St.. London. E. C. 



■Vl.hVI. 

Motorcycles in Stock 

3i H. P. Single Cylinders 

With Bosch M.<nato. *22S 

7 H. P. Twin C ylinders 

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TORPEDO MOTORCYCLES 

you 
the_ BEST yon cannot be a SATISFIED 



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Geneaeo.Ul..U.S. A. 



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1010 models now ready for delivery. 
Finest stock of parts for all makes of ma- 
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782 8th Ave., New York City 

F. A. M. OFFICIAL REPAIR SHOP 



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American X Agency=$ 

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\ yet. We give a discount that 
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W«lk ud BeMIIer St*., Chle*«o, DL 



McLaughlin & Ashley 

2284 Broadway. New York. 
N. S. U. MOTORCYCLES 

1 Immediate delivery in all new model*. 
Bargains in and hand machines. 



Supplies and accessories at prices that 
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St 



The pleasure of motorcycling 
is greatly increased by having 
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Order a "STANDARD" 
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STANDARD THERMOMETER COMPANY 

65 Shirley Street, - - - BOSTON 




SPEEDOMETER. ODOMETER 
Price $20.00 



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OTORCYCL 



ILLUSTRATED 



t-^-i— y 




November 1, 1909 



PUBLISHED BY THE MOTORCYCLE PUBLISHING CO., 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



STANDING START MILE RECORD BROKEN 

By Gustafson and Spencer — The Eastern District Meet. 



A SUCCESSFUL effort was made at the Stadium track at 
Springfield, on Saturday, the 23d, to lower the world's 
record for the standing start mile, and also to establish track 
records for the standing and flying kilometer, of which there 
are no official records either in this country or in England, 
while such records as may exist in France have probably been 
made with machines that would not be recognized as "regular" 
outside of that country. 

The trials for the records were on the program for the 
regular meet on the Saturday previous, following the meet of 
the Eastern District of die F. A. M., but had to be postponed 
on account of rain. The riding was done by Charles Gustafson 
and Charles S. Spencer, who probably accomplished all that 
was possible on the occasion, for the air was damp and heavy, 
and not by any means suitable for developing the best speed. 

The first trial was the flying kilometer, which was ridden 
by both Gustafson and Spencer in 29 seconds. The second 
trial resulted in 28H seconds for Gustafson and 28^ seconds 
for Spencer, which establishes a record for the distance on a 
track. This is at the rate of 40 seconds to the mile. 

Trials for the standing kilometer followed, and in this a 
quick getaway depended really more upon the men than the 
machines, and in this respect Gustafson appeared to have a 



slight superiority. The first trial resulted in 39^ seconds for 
Spencer. Gustafson followed in 40^ seconds, but immediately 
lowered this time, in a second trial, to 39%. On his second 
trial Spencer put the mark at 39H, while Gustafson on the 
last trial made the distance in 39 seconds flat 

In the standing mile trial, each rider made two attempts 
and each one on his first trial rode in 55f$ seconds. On the 
second trial Spencer fell back to $7Ht while Gustafson went 
back to 57 H. and as neither rider felt that he could improve 
on the first trial the judges decided that the record should 
stand at SSM seconds, to the credit of Spencer, who was the 
first to establish it 

The timing of these events was carefully done by four 
experienced men, as follows: Chas. R. Culver, H. C. Farr. 
Edw. Dumbleton and F. A. Eldred. The judges were E. W. 
Maynard, John Otto and E N. Tarbell, while the referee was 
Herbert A. Githens, of the G & J Co. The starter was 
James Jones. 

The machine on which these records were made was a 7 h 
Indian, with a piston displacement of 60.92 cubic inches. 

As the Stadium track measures exactly 23 feet over the 
mile, that distance was measured. forward from the finish 
line, and the start was made at that point. 



THE Springfield Stadium meet a week ago Saturday 
came to an untimely end, owing to the shower that 
blew up shortly after 3 o'clock and lasted long enough 
to wet the track sufficiently to prevent further riding. 
Two races, each of two heats, had been contested, when 
the heavy clouds, accompanied by a high wind, arose from 
behind the grandstand, and just as Charles Spencer was 
about to mount his machine to make a trial for the mile 
record the shower broke and sent the spectators scurry- 
ing for the cars. All the honors, so far as they went, fell 
to the Gustafson brothers, Charles and Paul, who made a 
rather easy thing of the first events on the program, each 
winning in straight heats. 

The one-mile Eastern District Championship event re- 
sulted in a victory for Charles Gustafson, who distanced 
Goerke, Spencer and Chappie, these riders finishing in both 
heats in the order named. In fact, the second heat was 
practically a repetition of the first. Gustafson sprang into 
the lead at the crack of the pistol, while the others were 
bunched about a dozen feet behind him. 

When two of the three laps that go to make a mile had 
been reeled off in the first heat, it looked for a moment as 
if Spencer might snatch second place from Goerke, and 
another round might have brought about this change in 
positions. The first heat was made in 52 2-5 seconds and 
the second in 58 seconds. These times are not remarkable. 



The comparatively slow riding in the second heat was 
to some extent due to the high wind. 

It had been intended to divide the five-mile event for 
private owners into two heats and a final, but on account of 
the withdrawal of two of the entries all of the men were 
started in both heats. A third was unnecessary for "In- 
fant" Paul added to his laurels by taking two pretty firsts. 
He had to fight for them though in both races, for Buffing- 
ton, of Providence, R. I., who is a new man on the local 
track, showed that he knew something about the game. 
In the first heat these two alternated in the lead three 
times during the five miles, and at the three-mile mark the 
Springfield boy appeared to be distanced. 

On the turn just beyond the grandstand, with Buffington 
about 50 yards in the lead, he opened his machine, and, 
with a remarkable burst of speed regained the advantage. 
At this point he lapped Shields, who trailed far behind in 
both heats. 

When the finish line was crossed Gustafson led by about 
12 feet, with the Providence man in second place and Hoff- 
man a rather poor third. These positions were not 
changed in the second race, which was ridden in five min- 
utes flat, a gain of five seconds over the preceding one. 

Young Gustafson has come to be a distinct favorite with 
the stadium crowds, and that of Saturday greeted his suc- 
cess with applause and congratulatory remarks. 



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xMOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



November 1, 1909. 



AWHEEL FROM CHICAGO TO THE HUB 

By L. H. BURNELL. 



WHEN I first conceived the idea of 
riding my Merkel from Uerwyn, 
111., a suburb qi Chicago, to Boston, my 
friends began to guy me quite unmercifully, 
amusing themselves by indulging in esti- 
mates of the limited distances which they 
respectively thought H wpuld be able to 
cover. Inasmuch- as I was a novice at the 
time I had misgivings myself, but, having 
determined to make the journey, I resolved 
that nothing within reason should stand in 
the way of the attainment of my object. 

Not being superstitious I left Berwyn 
on a Friday, intending to reach South 
Bend by sundown. But I had not figured 
on the prospect of meeting a fellow rider 
on a second-hand mount of antiquated 
specifications and in decidedly poor repair. 
When I came upon him he was endeavoring 
to repair a puncture in a tire which was 
already all patches. He wanted to go to 
Muskegon, Mich., and he asked me to show 
him the road which, being in good humor, 
I decided to do, although it took me out 
of my route. We reached Hammond at 
noon, where extensive repairs were made 
upon my partner's machine, while we 
sought to satisfy the longings of our 
respective stomachs, which were remarkably acute. 

On the way to Valparaiso, which we reached at 5 130 p. m., 
my .companion experienced a series of troubles which sorely 
tried my patience. But, keeping in mind the spirit of true 
motor camaraderie, I stuck to him, helping him through his 
numerous setbacks. At Valparaiso we fell in with two Chi- 
cago boys on Harley-Davidsons, who volunteered to show 
us the road to Michigan City. It had rained during the day, 
and it was not long before we were alternately walking and 
riding through the dark and the mud. But a fine, old-fashioned 
supper at the house of a friendly farmer and, after that, a 
good night's rest, brought back our ebbing courage and, in 
fine fettle, we made fairly good time through Westville, La 
Porte, South Bend, Elkhart, Middleburg and Lynn into Or- 
land where, now all alone, I again found muddy roads. Nor 
was it long before they got the better of me, producing a 
beautiful skid followed by an involuntary trip down a 
twenty-foot embankment. For the first time in my life, and 
as gracefully as I possibly could, I stepped over the handle 
bars of my machine, a careful examination of which assured 
me that absolutely no damage had been done to my trusty 
mount. By nightfall I reached the home of a relative in 
Gilead, Mich., with whom I spent a short vacation. 

While towing one of my cousins, who rode a bicycle, I be- 
gan to experience battery troubles, and it was some time before 
I discovered a short circuit. That having been remedied, my 
batteries gave excellent service, and they are still in use. My 
route now lay through California township, Camden, Homer 
and, very slowly over sandy roads, to Albion, still in the State 
of Michigan. On my way to Adrian, I passed through Pulaski, 
Moscow and Addison, where, running into a fence on a sharp 
turn, I bent my front fork. Nothing daunted, however, I ob- 
tained a healthy piece of pipe and, with the assistance of a 
farmer boy and his husky sister, I managed, after removing 
the front wheel, to bend the fork back into place, incidentally 
discovering that my machine was soundly made. 

Staying at Adrian over night, I passed through Blissfield, 
Toledo, Hessville, Fremont and Belleview, reaching Norwalk 




Burnell and His Merkel, Fully Equipped. 

just in time to escape a heavy rain. The roads through this 
part of Ohio were fairly good, although at times I had occa- 
sion to appreciate my spring forks as I traveled over spots of 
very rough clay. My next day's riding was quite as uneventful, 
and just as steady, the route taking me through Townsend, 
Oberlin and, over a piece of State road, to Elyria, whence I 
reached Cleveland late in the afternoon. There I spent the 
night. 

I now averaged one hundred miles a day. I could easily 
have doubled that had I started early in the morning. But 
I wanted to see the sights and, besides, it was pleasant to as- 
sume a standing position after having been in the saddle for 
several hours. Thus, by easy stages and over fine roads I 
passed through Mentor, Ashtabula and Fairview to Erie, Pa., 
and the following day through Moorhead, Ripley, N. Y., 
Brockton and Woodlawn Beach into Buffalo. I could not miss 
the opportunity of seeing Niagara Falls and of having the 
distinction of going into Canada for a few hours. So I rested 
for a day. 

It was the 20th day of July when I left Buffalo whence, 
passing through Lockport and Holley, I reached Rochester. 
Then, in their order, I journeyed through Victor, Waterloo. 
Summitt, Syracuse, Oneida, Utica, Frankfort and St. James. 
It was here that, in attempting to turn around one auto, I 
was struck by another and thrown on my head. Thanks to a 
heavy leather cap, my scalp remained intact, although I sus- 
tained a few scratches. The front fork of my machine was 
sufficiently bent to rub against the tire, so that, having ridden 
112 miles since morning, I quit for the day. 

Rain the following morning gave me a few hours' respite 
which I devoted to the front fork, about the lower ends of 
which I put a heavy strap, and then, having forced an ax and 
a plank in at the top, straightened the bars with the help of a 
cold chisel, a crude but effective repair job. By night I had 
reached Schenectady and, the following day, by way of Albany 
and Nassau, over some pretty tough roads, I came into Pitts- 
field, Mass. 

On the twenty-fifth, I experienced my hardest day, traveling 



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November 1, 1909. 



MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



over steep and muddy mountain roads in the direction of 
Adams, whither I had been misdirected. I passed through 
Savoy and Ashfield by moonlight, and slept in Greenfield. The 
next day, the last of my long journey, took me through Tur- 
ner's, Miller's Fall and Irving, where I struck a good State 
road which passed through Greenfield, Orange, Athol, Gardner 
and Fitchburg, where I had my second puncture. From Fitch- 
burg to Boston it is but forty-five miles and, going through 
Groton, Ayer and Lowell, I reached the Hub City by nightfall, 
my cyclometer registering 1,350 miles. 

It was a hard and yet a delightful trip, well worth the 
determination and effort which it required. 1 carried no 
spares except those which came with the machine, and I practi- 
cally escaped tire troubles. I used thirty gallons of gasoline, 
more than was really necessary, as I wasted much of it by 
flooding my carbureter. My trip cost me only $35, including 
the price of two tire shoes, one inner tube and a new belt. 
Finally, it is my opinion that, with a good companion and 
over rideable roads, there is no outdoor sport more healthful 
or interesting than a long motorcycle tour. So firmly con- 
vinced am I of this that I am desirous of making a trans- 
continental tour from Boston to San Francisco, provided some 
true sportsman will volunteer to accompany me. My present 
address is Lunenburg, Mass., and I would be glad to hear from 
any one who contemplates making this trip 'cross country. 



CC. WILBER, vice-president for the Eastern District. 
• reports that the complete F. A. M. organization of New 
Hampshire and New Jersey, down to the local commissioners, 
is as follows: 

New Hampshire. — Commissioner, Harry C. Dean, Keene ; 
State secretary, H. W. Hildreth, Marlboro; legal action, 
Glenroy W. Scott, Winchester; competition, F. E. Bronson, 
Newport; highway improvement, Leander Page, Swanzey; 
tours and hotels, Frank E. Leonard, Winchester; transpor- 
tation and facilities, G. Fred Little, Keene. 

New Jersey.— Commissioner, A. J. Sicard, Central avenue 
and First street, Hackensack ; state secretary, W. R. Schoon- 
maker, Areola: legal action, Herbert Wulling, Carlstadt; 
competition, H. B. Cummings, 69 Meyer street, Hackensack; 
highway improvement^ Herbert E. Coryell, East Orange; 
tours and hotels, D. Sawyer, 203 Summer street, Paterson; 
transportation and facilities, Dr. G. Brewster, Grantwood. 



THESE two road photos, re- 
produced from Quiver, pub- 
lished by C. C. Hopkins, of 
San Francisco, give one a 
slight idea of Southwestern 
riding conditions. The cut to 
the right is from a photograph 
taken by one Pillsbury, in the 
course of his travels through the 
Sierras. The cut below is that 
of a pathway through the wilds 
of Nevada and, though some- 
what narrow, is not half bad, in- 
sofar as the road surface is con- 
cerned. 



TWO NEW F. A. M. COMMITTEES. 






DR. J. P. THORNLEY, 

Reappointed Chairman of the F. A. M. Competition 
Committee. 

PRESIDENT F. I. WILLIS, of the F. A. M., announces 
the appointment of the Membership and Competition 
Committees for 1909- 19 10. It will be noted that Dr. J. P. 
Thornley is reappointed to the all-important place of chair- 
man of the Competition Committee and that ,otherwise the 
personnel of President Willis* appointees is all that could be 
desired : 

Membership Committee — E. M. Estabrook, chairman, 76 
Lincoln street, Bangor, Me. ; George W. Sherman, 1307 
Michigan avenue, Chicago, 111. ; W. F. Hapgood, Springfield, 
Mass.; F„ B. Hart, 235 Randolph street, Chicago, 111.: W. F. 
Remppis, Reading, Pa. 

Competition Committee — Dr. J. P. Thornley, chairman, care 
Hotel Ansonia, New York City; Will Douglass, Louisville 
Journal, Louisville, Ky. ; F. L. Valiant, P. O. Box 694, New 
York City; J. S. Patterson, Chicago Examiner, Chicago, 111.; 
Stephen Mclver, Riverside, Cal. 

FRED S. MORS?:, of Keene, N. H., nominated by C. C. 
Wilber, and seconded by E. L. Buffington, was elected 
to the secretaryship of the Eastern District of the Fed- 
eration of American Motorcyclists, at the meeting held 
in Springfield, Mass., on Saturday, the 15th of last month. 
Former Secretary B. A. Swenson, who had served most 
acceptably in that capacity during the past year, moved 
to make the % nomination unanimous, which was done. Sub- 
sequently, Mr. Swenson was appointed State Commis- 
sioner for Rhode Island. Fred S. Horenburger, of New 
York, nominated by F. L. Valiant, and seconded* by Mr. 
Buffington. was re-elected treasurer. 

The only other important business transacted at the 
meeting was an endorsement of Springfield's application 
for the next national convention of the Federation. 



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MOTORCYCLE ILLUSTRATED 



November 1, 1909. 



* 


CARBURETER CONSTRUCTION 

By THE NOMAD. 


$ 



A CARBURETER SUGGESTION. 



n. 



SINCE the days of the well tried and reliable surface* 
carbureter and" the old "wick" type, inventors seem to 
have followed but one design, with one or two minor excep- 
tions. All present-day tendencies pursue the accepted lines 
of the constant level, float- feed jet carbureter, with only 
slight variations. It is easy to see why this superabundance 
of kindred types exists, for, given a float valve in conjunc- 
tion with a jet and a length of tube, you have material with 
which an inventor may experiment cheaply. There is, and 
always has been, a wide diversity of opinion among those 
who have devoted special attention to the subject of car- 
buration, yet upon some points 
we have a distinct uniformity 
of ideas. For example, it is 
conceded by the majority that 
a thorough, constant and uni- 
form saturation of air with 
gasoline is absolutely essential. 
Still, we find others who con- 
tend that far greater efficiency 
and economy are to be ob- 
tained by variable proportions 
of the air and spirit units. 

If we give serious thought 
to the matter we can see that 
the effect produced by mixing 
air and gasoline, when an en- 
gine is running at low or in- 
termediate speed, is not the 
same as when the engine is 
running fast. Many inventors 
seem to be absolutely unaware 
of the properties possessed 
by the induced atmosphere. 
Again, we often find that cer- 
tain fundamental facts are 
completely overlooked ; for ex- 
ample, the velocities of pure 
air and gasoline spirits are not 
the same. The securing of a 
spraying effect is frequently re- 
garded as incontrovertible evi- 
dence of thorough vaporization, 
whereas spraying and the for- 
mation of a really homogeneous 
vapor are distinctly separate. 
The projection into a cylinder 
of streams of gasoline cannot 

by any stretch of the imagination be looked upon as coming 
within the category of a completely vaporized mixture. 

The principle upon which the greater number of jet car- 
bureters is manufactured is of ancient lineage. In the oldest 
patterns we find a plain vertical or horizontal jet, encircled 
by a vertical or horizontal tube, substantially of larger diam- 
eter, through which air is induced at a velocity proportioned 
to piston speed. In recent years there has been a decided 
tendency, in up-to-date design, to employ a plurality of jet 
orifices for the emission of fuel. These are uncovered as 
the engine revolutions rise or, to put it simply, by the open- 
ing of the throttle lever. The motorcycle field has not seen 
much of this type as yet, but everything points to its be- 
coming a standard design in the near future. 

Now, whether the usual method, namely the passage of the 
spirit past a jet or spray nipple and through a chamber, 
thereby setting up parallel lines of suction, adequately fills Again, it has been argued that compensation at different 




Something to Tickle the Fancy of Experimenters- 
Simple in Action and Entirely Effective. 



carburation needs, is open to question. Most of us are aware 
that one or more vertical jets within a horizontal air tube 
are used, and such devices appear to afford greater utility. 
Further, full jets, shaped and set so that two streams of 
gasoline impinge against each other, after the manner of the 
familiar gas lamp burner, constitute a still greater improve- 
ment. On the other hand, the now old-fashioned, round wick 
device possessed a feature of considerable merit in that a 
large central body of air traversed a substantial surface of 
material saturated with gasoline. The gasoline was drawn 
from the surface of a permeable pipe, through the medium 

of an air column, as opposed 
to the modern method of exert- 
ing suction upon the outside of 
a small tube, furnished with a 
nipple. A return to the wick 
carbureter is not in any way 
suggested, for among other ob- 
jections to this type, there was 
danger of a blowback into a 
vessel containing a large 
amount of gasoline, the ab- 
sorption of moisture by a wick, 
temperature changes, oscilla- 
tion of the fuel and rapid loss 
of volatility. 

The object of the adoption 
of an automatic lift valve for 
admitting an additional supply 
of air, when the revolutions of 
the engine become high, is to 
restrict the flow of gasoline. 
It is nevertheless debatable 
whether the suction or pull on 
the jet at high speeds, with or 
without such a valve, causes 
sufficient gas to be projected 
into the cylinder. For the time 
limit in the cycle of operations 
of the engine is exceedingly 
short, hence a considerable 
portion of gasified air is likely 
to be forced back in puffs at 
the completion of the admis- 
sion stroke. In this connec- 
tion, some few years ago, much 
care was directed to extra dilu- 
tion with air, but latterly the 
tendency is to render the supply of gasoline variable. In this 
way the quantity of spirit induced is augmented as the crank 
revolutions increase. Yet the extra air valve was originated 
with a view to reducing the amount of gasoline passing to 
the engine at high speeds. 

The principles demanded for efficacy in carburation are 
fairly well understood, but it is plain that the most suitable 
means for converting air and gasoline into a homogeneous 
gas, and its subsequent delivery to the engine under widely- 
varying conditions, have not yet been discovered. In some 
quarters it is believed that the gasoline should be warmed 
before admission to the cylinder, while others assert that a 
cold mixture produces more efficient combustion, provided 
the heat absorbed in converting the spirit to gaseous vapor 
coincides with the influence of evaporation, so that the heat 
units correspond to the amount of gasoline inducted. 



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speeds is^ not required, but this view is scarcely tenable, be- 
cause the suction of a motor varies with its speed, to say 
nothing of the fact that a greater or lesser heat is developed 
therewith. 

To stimulate experimenters to fresh efforts in this direc- 
tion, a part section drawing has been prepared by an auto 
engineer. In the figure, F represents the casing of the usual 
type of constant level, float valve, from which the gasoline 
passes through the conduit, C, and surrounds the lower part 
of the body of the hot, air-jacketed mixing cylinder, M C, by 
filling the annular space, S, therein. It will be noticed that 
the mixing chamber is open-ended and that the annular space, 
S, is in communication with the internal surface of the cylin- 
der, M C t through a series of finely pierced holes, H (shown 
much enlarged in the diagram, for the sake of clearness), 
round its wall. The bell crank levers, L, are adapted to move 
to and from the open-ended piston, P, which is therefore 
a sliding fit against the wall of the mixing chamber, M C. 
Consequently, when the piston is recoprocated downwards or 
upwards, it uncovers or covers respectively the series of 
holes, H. The dome D, fixed in the cylinder M C, is also 
perforated all over its surface with holes (not shown) but 
of a larger bore than those at H. 

No difficulty should be experienced in comprehending the 
simple action of such a device. A large column of air gathers 
at the bottom of the cylinder, M C, passing through with 
greater or less velocity, as the engine revolutions rise or 
fall. The effect of this, no doubt, is a very finely divided 
shower of gasoline from around the innermost circumference 
of the mixing cylinder. In addition, the spirit and air im- 
pinge upon the pierced dome, D, issuing therefrom as a thor- 
oughly atomized and vaporized mixture, proportioned with 
closely-approximate accuracy to varying speeds and loads. It 
should be especially noted that the important outstanding 
difference between this projected appliance and the customary 
patterns lies in the fact that the air column is solid, as it 
were, with a gasoline shower of variable intensity spouting 
against, instead of toward it, from the wall of the cylinder. 



In the case of a single or multi-spray jet allowing the issue 
of a few small streams, it seems very likely that it would 
be practically impossible for the air to become intimately 
mixed with the gasoline. The plan suggested, however, should 
permit of a near approach to the excelling feature of a 
well-made wick carbureter. 

There are over three hundred makes of carbureter in the 
world, and still there are a great many who, even at this 
stage, regard the employment of a fan in the mixing chamber, 
or the substitution of a rock for a metal float, as something 
distinctly novel. 

Notwithstanding claims to the contrary, the average ap- 
pliance may work well at fast or moderate speeds, but it is 
often unsuited to slow running, and vice versa. It would 
appear that the most satisfactory relative dimensions of the 
fuel-orifices, on the one hand, and of the air passage past 
those openings, on the other, have by no means been deter- 
mined with certainty. Strangulation will result if the area 
of the air passage is restricted, while the amount of the 
gasoline consumption will be quite abnormal. The practice 
of utilizing an extra air-diluting valve (which, as previously 
remarked, came to be adopted in order to check the flow of 
gasoline at high rates of revolution), coupled with the employ- 
ment of a variable plurality of gasoline jets, which cannot 
have any other effect than to increase the gasoline flow at 
high speeds, shows conclusively enough that, although the 
study of carburation seems earnest, much remains to be ac- 
complished. 

If an engine always worked at a constant rate of revolu- 
tions, like the stationary gas engine, no difficulty would be 
experienced in carburating its fuel. But it stands to reason 
that abrupt, irregular fluctuations of speeds and loads in the 
engine sorely try those devices which respond well at certain 
speeds and fail at others. We need a carbureter which will 
mix and deliver to the engine a combustible vapor, so pro- 
portioned as to strength and volume that it will be equally 
suitable to the differentiated requirements of the motor, what- 
ever the speed and load may happen to be. 



LESSONS OF THE ENGLISH TOURISTS' TROPHY RACE—BY B. H. DAVIES. 



WE English motorcyclists are to be envied for possessing 
a track like Brooklands, and for having a handy little 
island like that of Man, where we can persuade a flexible 
little home-ruling government to close its main roads for six 
hours, and give us a chance to run off a road race. There 
is no doubt that both as a sport and a spectacle, road racing 
is greatly superior to track competition. From the spectacular 
point of view, motorcycle track racing is not impressive except 
the track be of the three or four laps to the mile calibre, in 
which case the element of danger is always high — too high 
to attract large amateur entries. On the other hand, motor- 
cycles are dwarfed by a big track like Brooklands; you may 
get fifty machines rattling around at seventy miles an hour, 
and they just remind one of beetles crawling round a saucer. 

On the other hand, a road race such as we annually hold 
in the Isle of Man is a magnificent spectacle. Even forty 
miles an hour is a thrilling speed when it is done along 
narrow, twisty lanes. The laps are so long that, by the aid 
of a sixty-foot scoring board, the spectators can be kept 
apprised of the varying positions of every rider clean through 
the race. From a sporting point of view the road race is 
also superior. 

But there is always a fly in the ointment. We cannot get 
leave to use this sporting little Manx course on two days. 
Consequently, we have tried various handicaps, in the hope of 
putting 3 x /a-h. singles and 6-h. twins on a level in one 
and the same race, with a single set of awards. In pre- 
vious years we used a restricted supply of gasoline as the 
basis of the handicap, allowing the twins more than the 
singles, and we always managed to handicap the twins 
dean out of the race. This year, we left the gasoline sup- 
ply unlimited, and restricted the cylinder capacity instead. 



Singles were limited to tyoo cubic centimetres, while the twins 
were allowed 750 cubic centimetres, and under these regu- 
lations the singles had no chance at all. What are we 
going to do for next year? 

We may reduce the capacity of the twins, which will bar 
out the favorite type of 5-6-h. and compel every man to 
procure a special racer for the event. At present, we get 
a lot of touring machines, specially stripped and tuned. 
Or we could increase the capacity of the singles, which would 
result in the development of a special brand of single cylinder, 
developing something like 5-h., probably too thumpy for ordi- 
nary use. 

Our authorities are at present inclined to adopt the first 
alternative, to fix the conditions twelve months in advance, 
and so deliberately encourage a new brand of twin cylinder. 

A machine finished eighth in this year's race which almost 
exactly corresponds to the specifications these new regulations 
would encourage. It is known as the sH Premier, and 
although a comparative newcomer on our market already en- 
joys great popularity. It has a cylinder capacity of about 
10 per cent, more than our standard 3^-h. singles, which 
would be increased to about 25 per cent: for the purposes 
of our next handicap race. Its cylinders are set at ninety 
degrees, which theoretically gives a better balance than thirty, 
fifty, or sixty degs., as I am well aware personally because I 
own and drive a two cylinder having an engine of this type 
which is practically vibrationless, and indistinguishable from 
a four cylinder at almost every engine speed. In addition, 
the cylinders are offset from the crank pin, by which design 
better cooling is obtained than with the cylinders directly 
behind each other. An external flywheel of considerable 
size makes this engine noticeably smooth and flexible. 



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November 1, 1909. 



TIPS AND TOPICS 



m 



RECENTLY saw a good "puncture-resister," con- 
sisting of an old inner tube slit along the under 
side (with the valve cut out), and placed over a 
new tube, which was inserted in the cover. Here 
is an experiment which seems to be worth trying 
in these puncturesome fall days! 

T is sometimes hard to trace the reason for automatic inlet 
valves breaking off at the head, quite as puzzling, indeed, 
as finding the cause of a broken piston ring. One usually 
associates a breakage in a good piece of metal with a sudden 
shock or a heavy blow, and it seems impossible for this 
to occur in any way to an automatic inlet, which has a 
total movement of only a quarter of an inch. One would also 
think, in the case of the piston ring, that this was protected 
from fracture in an ideal manner by the cylinder walls, and 
that it would be impossible for a sudden shock to be com- 
municated to it. An explanation, in the case of the inlet 
valve, can be found in some physical change which would 
render the metal extremely brittle. The weakest part of 
an automatic or any other valve might well be assumed to 
be at the point where the cross section is diminished by 
drilling or slotting, to admit of the cotter or small key which 
keeps the spring in place; but the most extraordinary thing 
is that it is usually at some other part where the fracture 
occurs. Exhaust valves occasionally snap off at the neck, 
but this is now a much less frequent occurrence than it used 
to be, thanks to improved valve and exhaust port design. 
The cause, however, is often easily deduced from a careful 
examination of the fracture. It will usually be found that 
burning, scaling or oxidation of the metal from the action 
of the exhaust gases has so weakened it that the hammer- 
like blow of the valve head on its seat eventually proves too 
much for the valve, and the head and stem part company. 
I have seen a few cases where the cotter or key had sheared 
or cut right through the stem, but it is really the weakening 
at the neck that usually causes the fracture. The burning 
gases do not normally come into contact with the inlet valve 
stem at all, and whatever physical change may occur in the 
metal must be the result of mechanical stress. 

WHEN testing dry cells connected in series it is advisable 
to place the meter on the brass boH which runs 
through the carbon, as the carbon is a poor conductor, and 
it is very probable that an incorrect reading would be given. 
Sometimes, also, the brass bolt works loose, and this also may 
cause an inaccurate reading, so it is well to test these bolts 
for any perceptible shake. A useful tip is to test to the zinc 
of the next cell from the carbon terminal of the instrument, 
as this is certain to give a correct reading. 

AN engine sometimes refuses to start because the jet of 
the carbureter is obstructed in some way. Some car- 
bureters have quickly "get-at-able" jets, and it is an easy 
matter to clear them out; but to save this trouble a good tip 
is to squirt some gasoline into the cylinder and start the 
engine up. This gasoline is bound to produce some ex- 
plosions, providing the ignition is in good order, and the 
suction of the engine will often do the trick of clearing 
the jet, so that a long job may be postponed. 

WHEN once a split pin has been used and withdrawn from 
its place, it is often hard to get the ends of the pin 
close together for re-insertion in the old place. The best 
plan is to insert the small blade of a pocket-knife near the 
shank, and then to take a pair of pliers and pinch the ends. 
Talking of split pins reminds me of a tip on castellated nuts. 
Be very careful in seeing that a castellated nut is on the 
right thread, as otherwise, when put on a cross thread, it 
will often act as a die and cut a new thread itself, as the 



slots in the castellation serve for clearing the thread. I 
have actually seen a left-handed castellated nut cut a perfect 
thread on a right hand threaded bolt in such a way as to 
almost defy expert examination. 

Jt jl 

TALKING of experts, I came across a funny case of one 
being "held up" on a point regarding his own carbureter. 
He had just returned from a long reliability tour and 
was busy getting his machine^ tuned up again. Finding that 
his carbureter was chock full of dust, he went to work and 
thoroughly cleaned it. When he had everything assembled 
he tried to start, but the machine fired only intermittently, 
and in the end he took it round to another wilier expert, and 
they tried every artifice to get her going, with no result In 
the end, they took down the carbureter again, and found that 
the owner had, in replacing the float, placed it upside down. 

I HAVE written before of road dangers at night and advised 
the fitting of a powerful lamp to one's machine. Now 
that the early dusk falleth (vide the fall poet), this advice 
should be taken to heart. A friend of mine recently had 
a bad accident in direct consequence of his gas lamp being 
out of order. The lamp was burning very low on account 
of a clogged burner, and he was traveling at about twenty 
miles an hour on a country road, when he struck a long 
stretch which was being repaired and was full of ruts and 
rocks. The result was a bad smash. Fortunately, a doctor's 
automobile came along directly or the case might have been 
worse. Another brother sadly mourns the loss of a suit of 
clothes through riding in the pine forests of Maine at night 
without a really good lamp. Naturally, the reader will ask, 
why a suit of clothes? Simply because he made the fatal 
mistake of running over a skunk! 

ONE of the best methods of increasing one's swearing vo- 
cabulary is to fit a new tire on the rim, as they are 
usually pretty stiff. One requires a lot of patience for this 
job, and it often happens that when one has worked the 
new cover upon the rim, it is to find that the valve hole has 
"crept" away from its right position. This is all the more 
annoying because the new cover fits so tightly that it is 
almost impossible at times to shift it round to the right 
place, without taking the tire off again. There is only one 




JHUTH, of Cheyenne, Wyo., sends us the novel phot 
• reproduced above. It is respectfully submitted t 
our readers for solution. 



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A YOUNG MAN OF PROMISE. 




THE boy on the above machine is Master George Orr 
Vine, of Lake Linden, Mich., and if present ap- 
pearances count for anything, it is practically certain 
that he will some day be numbered in the ever-growing 
list of Harley-Davidson riders. 

really successful method of dealing with this difficulty and 
that is to make a wooden dummy valve, place the valve- 
hole in the cover so that it registers with that in the rim, 
insert the "dummy" and go ahead with the job, knowing that 
the tire cannot creep as long as care is taken not to disturb 
the dummy valve. The old method, and one which is still 
useful when there is no dummy to hand, is to fix about one- 
third of the cover in place, and then rest this portion of the 
wheel on the ground, so that the weight of the wheel helps 
to prevent creeping on the part of the tire. 

SOME time ago I wrote a few words of brotherly advice 
on the question of scientific driving, arid held that the 
man who drives his machine properly and kept it in tune 
would prolong the life of his engine. I may add that a 
great many riders are too fond of driving on full throttle, 
no matter at what speed the motorcycle is running. Fre- 
quently, it seems to me, even when the pace is low, riders 
prefer the comforting bang of full or nearly full throttle. 
Not to mention the factor of economy in fuel gained by 
closing the throttle to the merest whiff of gas, the all-im- 
portant point is that, unless the throttle is closed, the engine 
is far more likely to develop overheating tendencies, which 
is to be devoutly deplored 1 Again, such driving materially 
helps the formation of sooty deposit or carbon on the head 
of the piston and, sooner or later, "hammering" sets up, and 
the whole caboodle has to be dismounted for cleaning pur- 
poses. It is much better to drive in a rational manner, and 
to put off the cleaning of the piston until the winter. 

YV7E navc Deen suffering from a plethora of racing news 
*▼ lately; indeed, motorcycle racing has been booming. 
However, it is a question whether the public is not adversely 
influenced by too much of a good thing. The man on the 
sidewalk loves a thrill, and will go miles to see one, but 
the racing business "boosts" the motorcycle only as a speed 
machine, and some of the general public are prone to look 
upon the noisy twin racer as a representative of every motor- 
cycle sold, and thus the sport will get a decided setback unless 
we curb our ardour. Reliability trials, such as conducted 
by the F. A. M., induce the outsider to look upon the motor- 
cycle as a business proposition. The automobile world shows 



the trend of things, for reliability trials outnumber speed 
contests, and the sales record of many a non-racing motor 
car easily proves this point. The public wants a reliable 
business machine for its daily use, and will have it. I am 
not one who deliberately knocks anything successful, for I've 
the aches of many a track tumble in- my bones now, so I 
can truthfully vouch for an open mind on the question. Still, 
with an illicit love for an occasional speed-burst, when I 
buy my next year's mount I shall look at its reliability 
record. 

/~\NE could write a whole essay on the joys of night- 
V-^ riding. I say, one could; but a hard-hearted editor 
would blue-pencil all the little Emerson-like bits so much 
that it would be better to forfeit the stakes and call the bout 
off. Anyhow, the benefits of night-riding are many, especially 
to those confined in the city during business hours. It seems 
to clear the mind as well as to fill the lungs with pure, fresh 
air. As a sedative to the nerves during any business strain 
a night-ride is unsurpassed, bringing with it that glorious 
drowsy feeling which makes a comfortable bed a luxury. 
A reliable lamp, of course, is an essential to this form of 
enjoyment. Only last week I took in a long stretch of sea- 
shore road leading nowhere in particular. The moon effect 
on the sea, the anchored yachts and the scattered summer 
cottages in all their deserted beauty made me forget such 
mundane things as business and editors. 

If ERE is another tiplet going cheap! In cold weather it 
* 1 is frequently quite a job to transfer a quart of lubri- 
cating oil from the can into the tank, as the oil congeals and 
thickens, and therefore runs very slowly out of the can. 
To save a whole lot of time when filling up the oil tank, it is 
an excellent plan a few minutes before starting on the job 
to put the can of oil on the stove, to let it warm thoroughly. 
But do not forget all about it, as the neighbors may complain 
of your manufacturing fish glue in a respectable residential 
district. 



/^ARBON deposits in the cylinder may come from two 
^ sources; namely, the fuel or the oil, or sometimes from 
both. Sometimes a motor is so poorly designed with re- 
spect to the air passage that there is always more or less 
trouble from carbon, no matter what the grade of fuel 
used. The most efficient remedy for carbon deposits is to 
insist upon the grade of fuel and oil. The carbureter also 
plays an important part here, for if the gasolene is not 
fully vaporized before it enters the cylinder, there is apt to be 
more or less tendency to carbonization. 

HP HE Atlanta Automobile Association will conduct a 

* series of motorcycle races on the new Atlanta track, 
in connection with the Motor Show, November 9-13. The 
track, a two-mile speedway, is reported to be exceedingly 
fast and, if the auto speed trials can be taken as a cri- 
terion, the riders of the two-wheeled racing machines 
will do much better than they did at Indianapolis. En- 
tries, which close November 5, should be sent to Edward 
M. Durant, 720 Candler Building, Atlanta, Ga. 

HPHIS is the naive way in which the acquisition of a ma- 

* chine by one of its readers is announced by the Edina 
(Mo.) Sentinel: "Orville Turner, son of Jeff Turner, has 
a motorcycle upon which he flies over the country here 
as swift as a bird. They say that he can go at the rate 
of fifty miles an hour." Virgin territory, that. 

DROYMER, Mo.-E. E. Lyon, R. F. D. Carrier on Route 
*-* No. 1, has acquired a motor-driven two-wheeler. 

A FTER a ride over the range from Grand Junction, S. S. 
** Sanger, of Oklahoma, has arrived at Pueblo, Co. 



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November 1, 1909. 



MORE RECORDS BROKEN BY BERNARD. 



THE first meet of the Twin City clubs was held on the 
Hamline track, Minneapolis, Oct. 16. In the ten-mile 
open, Harvey Bernard, of Milwaukee, on a Harley-Davidson, 
set a new record for the motorcycle mile on the State fair 
track. He circled the big track in fifty-six seconds flat, two 
seconds under the record. The official time for the first five 
miles was 4.56. ' Though the weather was cold there was a 
fair crowd present 

S. H. De Long, of Minneapolis, was the referee and J. L. 
Bird, of St. Paul, the starter. The judges were W. Anderson, 
J. Korlath and R. S. Porter. A. J. Stata, Ira Enmark and 
William Barnaby were the timers. William Edwards was 
clerk of the course and Joe Groden and Lawrence Long the 
umpires, while Walter Wilmot, former manager of the St. 
Paul baseball team, was official announcer. 

Bernard rode in three races and won two, lapping in every 
one of them almost all of his competitors. F. S. Haas, of St. 
Paul, riding an Indian, was the only man in a to.tal field 
of eighteen for all three races who could keep within strik- 
ing distance of the Milwaukee man. Haas ran him a pretty 
race in all three events, and in the last one, the ten-mile 
race for single or twin cylinder chain or belt machines, beat 
the Harley-Davidson man. Bernard broke the exhaust valve 
of his machine at the beginning of the eighth mile, when he 
was a half-mile ahead of Haas. 

It was in this race that Bernard, according to unofficial 
time, broke the mile motorcycle record for the State fair 
track. This former record was 58 seconds, according to the 
figures for the seven miles, which the Milwaukee flyer rode. 
He went the fourth round in 56 seconds. His total time 
for the first six miles was 6 minutes and 57 seconds, and 
for the first five miles 4 minutes and 56 seconds. The last 
mile was slower than the other five, because in that mile the 
valve began to give out. 

Haas' time for the ten miles was 10 minutes and 43 sec- 
onds. E. H. Hammer of Minneapolis, on an Indian, was 
second, and F. C. Legg. on a Reading Standard, third. 

Harry Bird, of St. Paul, was second in the first race for 
twin cylinder belt machines over a five-mile course. Frank 
Teir, on a Merkel, won the event in 6.08, and C. S. Horn 
was third on an N. S. U. 

Haas won the five-mile single cylinder, chain or belt ma- 
chine, stock stripped, race in 5.56, with his Indian. E. H. 
Hammer was second on an Indian, and a Harley-Davidson, 
ridden 1>v B. C. Ostrander, was third. 




W. J. Tcubncr, the Clever Merkel Rider. 



The third event for trade riders, with a field of eight, was 
the first in which Bernard rode. The race was his from 
the start. At the crack of the pistol he was off like a flash, 
and before the first turn in the track was reached he led the 
field by yards. He gained steadily and lapped three of the 
slower riders and finished far in advance of Haas. The time 
for the race was 6.52^. 

In the fifth event, the open five-mile race for single cylin- 
der chain or belt machines, for trade riders, Bernard wanned 
up a little and captured it in 5.20^. In this race he again 
demonstrated his speeding ability and finished far ahead of 
the field, of thirteen contestants. Haas again took second and 
J. Schwister on a Harley-Davidson was third. 

In the sixth event, a five-mile race for single cylinder 
belt machines, fully equipped, and open for club members only, 
B. C. Ostrander, of St. Paul, on a Harley-Davidson, won in 
6.28; H. A. Bird, on a Merkel, was second, and Ed Worth- 
ington, on a Wayne, was third. The summaries : 

Five-mile single cylinder, chain or belt, stock stripped (club 
members) — F. S. Haas (Indian), winner; E. H. Hammer 
(Indian), second; B. C. Ostrander (Harley-Davidson), third. 
Time, 5:56. 

Five-mile, twin cylinder, chain or belt, open (trade riders) 
— H. Bernard (Harley-Davidson), winner; F. S. Haas (In- 
dian), second; E. H. Hammer (Indian), third. It was in this 
event that Bernard broke the Hamline motorcycle record. 
Time, 4:52^. 

Five-mile single cylinder, chain or belt, open (trade riders) 
— H. Bernard (Harley-Davidson), winner; F. S. Haas (In- 
dian), second; J. Schwister (Harley-Davidson), third. Time, 
5 :20*i 

Five-mile, single cylinder, belt, fully equipped (club mem- 
bers)— B. C. Ostrander (Harley-Davidson), winner; H. A. 
Bird (Merkel), second; Frank Teir (Merkel), third 
Time, 6:28. 

The ten-mile, single cylinder, chain or belt, open, was the 
most exciting event on the programme. While on the seventh 
mile, and a half mile in the lead, Bernard's exhaust valve 
broke, and he was forced to drop out. Had this not hap- 
pened he probably would have broken all records, as he made 
the third mile in 56 seconds. Haas (Indian), won; Hammer 
(Indian), second; F. C. Legg (Reading Standard), third. 
Time, 10:43. 

Ten-mile, twin cylinder, chain or belt, stock stripped (club 
members) — F. S. Haas (Indian), winner; Hammer (Indian), 
second; Legg (Reading Standard), third. Time, 10:42^. 

Five-mile, twin cylinder, belt machine, fully equipped— 
Frank Teir (Merkel), winner; Harry Bird (Merkel), second; 
C S. Horn (N. S. U.), third. Time, 6:08. 

In the time trial race, C. S. Horn (N. S. U